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CR Grampian corridor stock , part 6, some details


Dave John

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I have been making slow but steady progress. When I started I knew that it would take most of the summer, so I’m happy just pottering on with it all, learning as I go along.

 

A few details. This is the luggage rack assembly, with the mirrored compartment wall. The brackets were a very fancy design, I have simplified them as they are less than 4 mm long. Not difficult in itself, but I have 64 of them to make.

 

 

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Seating is provided in the kit but it is basic and needs a bit of extra work. These are the first class seats. The silhouette cut the armrests and the wings, both trimmed in lace. How many antimacassers? Well, 78 of them.

 

 

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An internal view. The D96 is a nine compartment third. This photo was taken in dark conditions, I wanted to see how the level of lighting looked in practice.

 

 

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As I have mentioned in the past painting and lining is not my strong point. I gave a couple of sides a coat of rattle can, then left them for a few days to really dry. It is “Vauxhall Burgundy Red”. Now experts would tell me that I should be using an airbrush to spray a more accurate shade but there are limitations to what I can do in a flat.

 

I really wasn’t happy about the idea of painting all those panels. Hmm, so I decided to have a go at making lined transfers on white transfer paper. Design was not difficult, but repetitive. I had some “Crafty” brand paper, first print, awful. Ink smeared all over. Second print, worse. So I learned that transfer paper degrades over time.

 

New white transfer paper ordered, “Mister decal paper” brand. Printed well, transfers made and applied to a paint test card. Not bad but I still felt that the white part had too much of a pink tinge from the coach purple underneath. The answer would be to paint the panel white before applying the transfer, but that was what I was trying to avoid.

 

I sat and had a think, what if I just put an identical transfer over the first? I tried it and it worked perfectly, nice white panel with the line round it showing up well. So here is a D 94 composite side as a first example.

 

 

 

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I am quite pleased with that. I wouldn’t claim that it is as fine as that produced by an expert painter with considerable skill with a lining pen. However I am not one and this method looks the part from normal viewing distances. It is also very fault tolerant. Make a mistake cutting round the transfer, bin it, next one. Realise that a panel is a bit squint, drop of water, adjust it.

 

Having got the techniques sorted out I can push on and do the rest, still a fair amount to do though.

 

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An excellent solution to the lining problem.  I’ll try it on my pre 1900 GWR coaches if I can get cream transfer paper!

Duncan

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Interesting technique.  Could you post some closer up pictures as and when you do the next sides?

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5 hours ago, Dave John said:

Ok, a very harsh closeup.

 

 

Not perfect, but better than I could do by hand. 

Thanks.  Looks good to me!

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18 hours ago, Dave John said:

Ok, a very harsh closeup.

 

 

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Not perfect, but better than I could do by hand. 

Looks pretty good to me.  I don't think I could achieve that standard even by following your technique, but it does seem to be a practical approach to a very difficult problem and has enabled you to produce excellent results without having to get the hang of those lining pens which I gave up on long ago.  Congratulations.  The carriage seating is pretty impressive too.

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@Dave John Are you using glued construction on the coach bodies? Just noticing you painted and lined them before putting the bodies together.

 

Edited by BennyBobRM
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Hi Bennybob,

 

 I put considerable effort into developing a method which would allow me to work on the coach sides on the flat then simply fit them in place. Then take them on and off again as many times as I want without any difficulty. Clean the insides, move the passengers about, that sort of thing.  

 

The simple answer is magnets, have a read of the blog two back ;

 

 

If you have look through the blog as a whole you will see that it is a continuing theme for me. Causes a wry smile and I do tend to waffle on a bit but there is method in my madness. I try to make models which are easily maintained, probably as a result of spending  lifetime trying to sort out things which are a nightmare to maintain due to bad design. 

 

So I have buildings and stock with the roofs held on by magnets. Electrical sub assemblies which slot into place. Signals which plug in and couple to the servos magnetically. Compensation beams with screw adjustment for ride height. Baseboards that lift up like a car bonnet so I can get at the gubbins underneath easily. The whole layout on castors. All for ease of maintenance. 

 

If I needed to decorate or do serious work to the room I could remove all the delicate stuff and wheel the whole layout into a different room in a few hours. 

 

As I said I waffle on a bit, but there some useful ideas in there. 

 

 

Edited by Dave John
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1 hour ago, Dave John said:

there some useful ideas in there

...there certainly are and I've adopted quite a few of them and there are quite a few more I wish I'd seen before completing something - the car bonnet baseboards in particular!

 

Kit PW

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Aha! That's an interesting technique, Dave, looks very good to me.  You can't see that it's double-layered either, which is a little surprising.

 

I also have some old Crafty paper, but it looks like I shouldn't be counting on that. It's a shame they closed, they had some interesting products. Thanks for the tip about Mister decal paper.

 

In the midst of all the excitement about the panels, I think your interior deserve a mention too (the coach interior, not yours!). Looks excellent.

 

Will there be passengers? Always a dilemma, I think.

 

Edited by Mikkel
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Cheers Mikkel, 

 

Might be worth trying the Crafty paper, the stuff I had was about 6 years old if I remember correctly. 

 

Getting in to fit passengers is easy with the magnetic sides. I have a few of Andy Staddens seated Edwardians, but I think I will buy some more or try a few other suppliers and paint them over the winter. 

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Ah yes, another good reason for magnetic sides.

 

Quote

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I've been looking at this photo and thinking it would make a nice display item in itself, when not in use. Especially if the light could be kept on. 

 

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