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Luggage Van

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nebnoswal

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Well I've dived off into the deep end today! After yesterdays playing with the forthcoming Manor, it was straight out to the garage today, in between nappies and bathing and burping. I recently purchased a kit for a Maunsell 51ft SR bogie gangway luggage (GBL) van from Ultima Models for inclusion in my Pines Express. I've never fully attempted a brass etch kit, but you have to have a go some time, especially considering I've been stockpiling them for the last couple of years.

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So here is the result of one evenings work. I got all the ventilation vents fitted as well as the chalk boards. The side-walls and ends folded-up and soldered, and they are nearly square! I've attached the battery boxes, one panel of timber bracing and started on the solebar. All this and I only burnt myself once.

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So what did I learn? I need a new soldering-iron for starters. Hopefully tomorrow I don't buy anything at the Sandown train show and my train-fund can purchase a temperature-controlled iron on my way home. I also need a decent tip cleaner and some metal clamps (plastic melts) to hold things in place, either that or become an octopus!

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It hasn't scared me off, yet, so I will continue. There is some finer detail to add, including numerous vertical ribbing strips that look like being a bit of a challenge.

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That's great work considering timescale, especially for first time. You dived into that with quite some confidence!

 

I see you have one of those 'hold and fold' things - do they also assist you in curving the tumblehome? A good investment?

 

I'll be following ... :)

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As Nick says wooden clothes pegs are good. You can drill them to take a kebab skewer through a block of wood see here. Looks good so far. I would like one of those kits (the early styles) for myself :) You should persist in burning your fingers until you can hold the parts by hand to solder! This is not so easy on brass, but quite possible on nickel silver.

 

My temperature controlled iron was one of the best investments I ever made. I have the Antex TC-50 and also a 25W iron but I tend to use the 50W most of the time. Get a variety of tips too. I find that if you keep wiping clean regularly with a sponge and don't leave solder to sit on the iron that I don't need to use tip tinner/cleaner. The one I do use I got from Eileen's Emporium, but I've lost the lid off the container so can't tell you what it is.

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Looking good Ben. I like the choice for a first step into an etched coaching stock model - no tumblehome (sorry Southernboy) but a fair number of fiddly bits to add. Nick and Richard are both correct about the usefulness of small wooden clamps, the link Richard provided showing a useful item indeed: and remember, the working end of the clothes peg can be carved to suit requirements.

 

Despite the teasing of Sithlord it appears Ben remains a dedicated N modeller - I sent some teaser 2mm bits and Ben promptly starts building a large N layout! Or at least publicising same.

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That's great work considering timescale, especially for first time. You dived into that with quite some confidence!

 

I see you have one of those 'hold and fold' things - do they also assist you in curving the tumblehome? A good investment?

 

I'll be following ... smile.gif

 

Good investment - yes. Its not the name brand 'hold and fold', but just as good for a quarter of the price. I picked-up on eBay from a US supplier.

 

Tumblehome - No

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I've always "cheated" (in certain eyes) with the finer detail on etched coaches. I solder up everything that needs soldering then use superglue paste for the detail bits. You have to do them in that order because the superglue paste will fracture if you then solder near it later, and also very hot superglue gives off nasties.

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