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Wallpaper for Wednesday


Chris Nevard

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In the late summer of 1964 Ivatt Class 2 tank No. 41248 slows for Catcott Burtle with the 2pm service from Evercreech Junction to Highbridge. Note the gleaming ex-works Hawksworth brake composite passenger coach and the Southern Railway bogie parcels van for cheese, cider and another perishables.

 

The coach is my most recent item of rolling stock, and it will of course be weathered in due course. I intend to add a yellow band above the first class section. A single Hawksworth coach and a bogie van was a typical formation for Highbridge branch passenger trains in the final few years on the former S&D.

 

Pic: this was taken on a little Canon G9 in natural north facing window light with the camera resting on a bean bag. Exposure was 1 second at f8 which is the little Canon's smallest aperture. The backscene is not a fake one added after the photo was taken but an actual high photographic one attached to the rear of the layout and created from a panorama taken near the real location.

 

 

 

  • W I D E S C R E E N computer wall paper can be found HERE!

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Lovely image Chris, as always. Kicking myself for not saying hello on Saturday, but you looked busy setting up a shot on the MR stand. Nice to see use of the G9... I still use my old G2 for quick shots, my normal DSLR lens is devoid of Macro, and the macro is only available at the 300mm setting on the longer lens (not quite right for these shots). I will make sure I try the north facing side of house for next natural light shots as this shows that the results can be very pleasing. Thanks... Jon

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Cheers :yahoo_mini:

 

North facing light is very cold in colour, so I set the camera white balance set to 'auto' though 'cloudy' could be another option. 'Daylight' will produce a very blue photo. The KELVIN of this shot was around 8000k. Sunlight is around 5000k and domestic old fashioned incandescent around 2500k. Of course you probably already know this so just tell me to $%^& :lol:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kelvin

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