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Undecided sky (1867)


Mikkel

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More "out of period" operation here. This time going back in time quite a bit. In fact, it seems they didn't even have flush-glazing back then ;).

 

 

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The year is 1867, and it is early days at Farthing station. Mr Crummles gently guides his wife towards the first class carriage, while Mr Doyce looks on in anticipation of the journey ahead.

 

 

 

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Mrs Crummles is somewhat apprehensive. It is only a few months since that dreadful accident at Warrington, and who knows what could happen?

 

 

 

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Meanwhile Mr Doyce, ever the optimist, studies the magnificent engine that will be whisking them to Salisbury. For him there was never any doubt: These fine machines have forever changed the world!

 

 

 

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Plucking up her courage, Mrs Crummles asks her husband one last time if he is quite sure that it is safe to get on?

 

 

 

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While the last passengers finally board the afternoon departure, an undecided sky develops over Farthing. For worriers and optimists alike, the future seems uncertain but exciting.

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5 hours ago, C126 said:

 

Dear Chris, Thank you for your kind words and much-appreciated advice.  Figure-painting is something I have put off, but these were just too good to resist.  I assumed one did the 'big colours' first, and finished with the detail (the smaller the area the less likely one was to slip).  I have noticed both how my eye-sight would benefit from an illuminated magnifier and my hands from being steadier now I am past the half-century.

 

Another concern is trying to keep the layer of paint thin enough to maintain the exquisite detail.  I was sorry to see the primer 'reduced' some facial expressions.  Do people prefer slightly thinned enamels rather than acrylics?  Another aspect to explore...  Many thanks again.  Neil.

 

Neil,

I use acrylic primers if I am brushing and try and brush off any excess.  I try to spray though, if I can, using Halfords finest.  If you look back in Mikkel's blog, and look forward you will see quite a lot about figures and painting.  There is some info about figures on my Traeth Mawr thread, just go page by page until you see a picture.

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Just seen this. Good to see some more of Andrew's period figures! C126, you could do a diorama for them, e.g. a family gathering around their means of transport, or similar.

 

I'm doing a street scene at the moment and was wondering if I should include a couple of Andrew's ladies promenading. Although on reflection I don't know how much of a walk even the more liberal Edwardian dresses allowed for?!

 

I think I prefer Solomon's second attempt. Although less daring at first sight, the colours and the looks are really much more, well, sexy. 

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ChrisN

Posted (edited)

14 hours ago, Mikkel said:

Just seen this. Good to see some more of Andrew's period figures! C126, you could do a diorama for them, e.g. a family gathering around their means of transport, or similar.

 

I'm doing a street scene at the moment and was wondering if I should include a couple of Andrew's ladies promenading. Although on reflection I don't know how much of a walk even the more liberal Edwardian dresses allowed for?!

 

I think I prefer Solomon's second attempt. Although less daring at first sight, the colours and the looks are really much more, well, sexy. 

 

Mikkel,

I think if you look at the films of the day the ladies carried on as much as they do now.  They wore these dresses continually so were used to them.  In 'Grandfather's London', photos from 1875,  there is a picture of a lady carrying her child.

 

Reason for Edit: jadies to ladies

Edited by ChrisN
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1 hour ago, ChrisN said:

the jadies carried on as much as they do now. 

 

That's no thing to say about respectable young women, though from what one reads there was certainly at least the usual proportion of jades and jezebels:

 

image.png.0d843e2218a77dd21b641a726481966d.png

 

 

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4 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

That's no thing to say about respectable young women

I dare say that some of the tree modelling techniques so ably demonstrated on RMWeb could be adapted to make a respectable model of those hats....

 

Kit PW

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I should perhaps stress that the style of dress shown in the photo above would not be worn on the platform of a Welsh country station in 1908, let alone 1895. The intention was to illustrate Edwardian jadies! For full details, see here

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2 hours ago, Compound2632 said:

I should perhaps stress that the style of dress shown in the photo above would not be worn on the platform of a Welsh country station in 1908, let alone 1895. The intention was to illustrate Edwardian jadies! For full details, see here

 

I will give this my full attention when I have a bottle of lavender water nearby...

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Ah, Paris!

 

19 hours ago, kitpw said:

I dare say that some of the tree modelling techniques so ably demonstrated on RMWeb could be adapted to make a respectable model of those hats....

 

Chris has had a go with string here: 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/82047-traeth-mawr-building-coaches-mostly/&do=findComment&comment=4434807

 

 

Incidentally I've noticed a new range of Edwardian figures from Arch Laser here:

https://www.osbornsmodels.com/arch-laser-osbf0020-oo-gauge-edwardian-passengers-oo--176-scale--unpainted-set-of-six-51528-p.asp

 

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Just wanted to post further proof as to how you here have led me astray:

 

PICT2543.JPG.fde69ee928acf8a398303789f5d1d8a4.JPG

 

Managed to get to a real model shop yester-day and spent too much money, including the above which was certainly not on my shopping list.  Who could resist it, though?!?

 

I think it will be a while till I build it - still wrestling with viaduct brick-work - but I know if I did not get it when seen, I would regret it.  Now to resign myself to beans-on-toast for dinner for the next three weeks...

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Mikkel

Posted (edited)

A most elegant vehicle, I can see why you were tempted.

 

Not knowing precisely what defines a "Brougham", I did a search. This page from The Carriage Foundation has some information. Clearly an intimate affair, and well in line with the leitmotiv developing in this discussion.  Abraham Solomon would have approved! :)

 

PS: That page even has a livery example, if you're in need of one: Upholstered in blue cloth on the exterior and dark blue morocco leather and blue cloth on the interior. Painted blue with red lining. 

 

Edited by Mikkel
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I used some of Andrew's figures for our 'Tribute to Brunel' layout in the Great Model Railway Challenge. However, my research was based more on My Fair Lady than reality.

 

41797797195_c8ac4a8b6b_o.jpg.de05f12bad64d948f02ec2061934cc90.jpg

 

While Langley castings were used for the less well to do

 

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Taking a stroll alongside Brunel's atmospheric railway representation, that was almost unseen on the TV.

 

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Apologies that my modelling efforts are far inferior to @Mikkel

 

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Apologies for the somewhat haphazard typing here - trying to iron shirts for work to-morrow, listen to programme about Louis Armstrong, and ponder Cold War food stores on another thread - but I recommend 'Carriages at eight : horse-drawn society in Victorian and Edwardian times', Huggett, Frank E., Guildford : Lutterworth Press, 1979.  p.30:

 

"One of the most popular Victorian carriages was the coachman-driven brougham, a small closed vehicle of French origin, seating two people, which Lord Brougham had redesigned in 1838 as "a refined and glorified street cab that would make a convenient carriage for a gentleman".  A brougham cost about £150, though a miniature brougham, which was much favoured by young Guards officers, could be bought for £20 or £30 less.  There was also a coupe, or double, brougham, drawn by a pair of horses, and seatign four, which was a popular choice among aristocrats with a large brood of daughters."

 

Also an ill. p.29. "preserved in Glasgow Museum of Transport".

 

Thanks for the link, Mikkel.  Don't remember that web-site when I went 'carriage bagging' (e.g. https://museum.maidstone.gov.uk/our-museums/carriage-museum/ , which is recommended, if decaying slowly when I visited years ago.

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8 minutes ago, Ian Morgan said:

I used some of Andrew's figures for our 'Tribute to Brunel' layout in the Great Model Railway Challenge. However, my research was based more on My Fair Lady than reality.

 

41797797195_c8ac4a8b6b_o.jpg.de05f12bad64d948f02ec2061934cc90.jpg

 

While Langley castings were used for the less well to do

 

40887052090_2dbc579d2d_o.jpg.678ccf8720cadabac2af7c1fc1ea4886.jpg28822406888_7fa0961efb_o.jpg.7e429ae3b26aac8604ffd404edf03dc9.jpg

41978154204_fcf52d08b6_o.jpg.6afd58af0b55839e0720d0edf5acf110.jpg

 

Taking a stroll alongside Brunel's atmospheric railway representation, that was almost unseen on the TV.

 

DSC05308.JPG.ecc21a00a42b6a72eb42811cae3700a8.JPG

 

Atmospheric_railway_diorama_3.jpg.68a70854e68e3ae3c90f21f5ad167966.jpgAtmospheric_railway_diorama_2.jpg.930aba029802fa1029694e43eeddf5a7.jpg

 

Apologies that my modelling efforts are far inferior to @Mikkel

 

 

They look pretty good to me!  Well done.

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On 28/07/2021 at 06:15, Mikkel said:

Ah, Paris!

Yes, we’ll always have Paris…

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16 hours ago, Ian Morgan said:

Taking a stroll alongside Brunel's atmospheric railway representation, that was almost unseen on the TV.

 

Definitely not inferior to anything, Ian. I wasn't able to watch the shows as they can't be accessed from here in Denmark (VPN didn't work).

 

A shame that the atmospheric railway didn't get shown properly, I like the look of it. What happened to that particular section afterwards, has it been broken up?

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14 minutes ago, Mikkel said:

A shame that the atmospheric railway didn't get shown properly, I like the look of it. What happened to that particular section afterwards, has it been broken up?

 

The layouts for the final had to join together at the end, so our layout did not really make sense on its own and was broken down. The N scale Royal Albert Bridge has been re-formed as its own layout, and was shown at the last TINGS exhibition and is still having scenery improved. The atmospheric railway section has been cut down and is a static diorama in my display cabinet. Another member of the team kept the Maidenhead bridge to create another diorama.

 

Mortimer station, Starcross pumping house, Box tunnel and IKB popping out from his pile of chains are still knocking around somewhere.

 

Read more about our Tribute to Brunel on rmweb here

 

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