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getting there...


bcnPete

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Good afternoon,

 

Despite a recent flurry of activity on PWIAB, work has been progressing on trying to finish this project.

 

I suddenly realised that I was going about it all the wrong way :O I had been trying to complete the station building before tackling all the other bits and pieces and detailing but whilst not wanting to rush the second attempt at the building, it meant there was no progress on everything else... :scratchhead:

 

So, I decided to reverse that, concentrate all my efforts on all the outstanding elements and leave the station building to last...after all, it is the most important structure on the layout.

 

So...this is what I have been up to...

 

Fascia: The exterior of the layout has now been painted in my preferred grey colour. I always used to use black on past layouts but of recent, I find this to look very smart. I have also re applied the text to the front and added the 2mmFS logo...this turned out to be a good strategic move as the layout now starts to feel more finished.

 

blogentry-3290-0-88628900-1326998498_thumb.jpg

 

The card has been painted a couple of coats - would have preferred something a bit more matt, but its difficult to find a lot of materials here...

 

Backscene: Previously, I had painted the backscene a sky blue as a base and was in two minds how to treat it. Gary (of Glenuig fame) kindly offered to take some photos last year whilst in Kyle and I mentioned the backscene. Not only did Gary kindly take the photos, he also offered to stitch them together as a panorama and send me a file. The backscene is more moody and representative of the context I feel and certainly is a big improvement on the one I hashed together for the BHMRC 2010 show...Many thanks again Gary.

 

I have attached it with masking tape whilst I try and work out the best method of fixing it to avoid bubbles...all suggestions most welcome!

 

blogentry-3290-0-49658800-1326998515_thumb.jpg

 

New backscene without 90 degree corners :no: Thanks also to Tony Simms to suggest that...

 

Platforms: The platform and road surfaces have been redone with some wet n dry paper.

 

Wall and bridge: The stone wall has had some dry brushing and further work will be undertaken on this with some weathering powders. The road bridge has also been reinstated together with the handrail.

 

Sidings: I wanted to represent the fence that was installed adjacent to the line and for this I have used Bernard TPM's excellent fence product. A very nice kit of etches and cast components and whilst it is the temporary fencing often used around construction sites, I think it works in this situation. I put a small kink in it as I have never visited a building site to date and found one erected in a perfect straight line!

 

Quayside: The wall has been repainted (again) and the water has been repainted (again) which I have decided to paint layers of gloss varnish on rather than the PVA method which I didn't really get on with. The wall will continue to have applications of dry brushing to add further colours etc. I have also redone the metal ladders which this time are extended to form the grab rails to climb on and off and also some small tyres have been added, strung on cotton thread. Again, some further weathering powders will be added to these items. Also added...but not stuck is a small boat I found in my pot of bits from years old. Not sure whether it works or not so the jury is still out on that. A couple of photos of the above...

 

blogentry-3290-0-37150900-1326998522_thumb.jpg

 

Station building awaiting completion...the TPM fencing...built and arranged slightly imperfectly...

 

blogentry-3290-0-71999200-1326998536_thumb.jpg

 

The wall still needs further work including reinstating the blue Kyle signage...

 

I am hoping to get back to the station soon and I have just received from Ian (Scanman) some of his self adhesive tiles (seen on the excellent Tavistock Blog) to complete the roofing. In between restarting the station I will be continuing to add colour/weathering powders.

 

blogentry-3290-0-33652200-1327000897_thumb.jpg

 

Looking back...just needs some rolling stock now...

 

 

I did say I would finish it and not get too distracted by the other project(s)... :D

  • Like 11

23 Comments


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That fence looks very good Pete. I only noticed it as I scanned back up through the photos. Shows how much it blends in.

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  • RMweb Gold

Lovely Pete.

 

That backscene certainly adds that Scottish atmosphere!

 

Tom.

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That is all looking very neat. I see what you mean about the grey paint, I think it emphasises the bleakness of the backscene, whereas the black was neat, but a little stark... now it's all "one". as the other have said, the details are really pulling this together. Glad you're cracking on to finish it all off... something to show the in-laws?

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That is fantastic. The moody backscene and the grey paint really give it an atmosphere of cold and emptyness. Photo three is really good; the view looking over the quay with the station and cloudy mountains behind is very effective.. Though the station is unfinished the shadow that falls from the baywindow really makes it feel like a cool bleak evening.

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Absolutely wonderful stuff Pete.

 

That backscene looks excellent and captures the ruggedness of the terraine nicely.

 

Presentation looks fantastic too and as others have said the grey paint adds to the bleakness and doesn't over power the actual layout itself.

 

Bet you're really pleased with the progess you've made?

 

Just needs a Class 153 26 idyling at the platform with few Mk 2's.

 

Next instalment waited with baited breath!

 

Cheers,

 

Mark

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  • RMweb Gold

Ah yes, looking very good indeed. In fact, it might even work without the station building (no, really).

 

I forget: those letters in the text, what are they made from?

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Wow. After the diorama challenge and with the Paddock Wood project you are the master of these atmospheric micro layouts.

Don

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Ah yes, looking very good indeed. In fact, it might even work without the station building (no, really).I forget: those letters in the text, what are they made from?

 

 

As a "proportion thing" it might well work better without the station building, or maybe a very much shortened version of it......

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Pete,

 

This looks really good. Amazing how sweeping up a few details really makes the scene start to look complete.

Re. attaching the backscene. I had a real fight with photographic backscenes until I partly took the Nevard route. I had the backscene encapsulated with a matt finish by a local firm in Manchester who I found by the inevitable googling. That much came from Mr.Nevard's Catcott blog but I can't remember what he used to attach it. I used display mount, the repositionable stuff; still a bit hairy applying the encapsulation but at least you can move it around a bit until it is where you want it to be. Been on for about eighteen months now with no bubbling or lifting.

 

David

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Excellent! The backscene really pulls the whole thing together- v. impressed.

I found Photomount the best for attaching these, but its heart-in-mouth work, with no margin for error.

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Pete.That looks excellent.

 

In your description above you mention :-

"I am hoping to get back to the station soon and I have just received from Ian (Scanman) some of his self adhesive tiles (seen on the excellent Tavistock Blog) to complete the roofing."

 

One thing I have found, but have not got round to mentioning on the Tavistock blog, is that it I think it may be important to keep solvents such as MEK and perhaps enamel paint thinners well away from the self adhesive labels. I found on the station building roof that the slate layers had lifted in a couple of places (creating a bubble effect). Although I am not sure of the exact cause, I suspect it was because I used thinned enamel paints as a wash in the weathering process and this soaked through the slate layers and disolved the stickiness of the labels. When I get to the weathering of the train shed roof, I'm going to try water based washes and try not to get too much liquid soaking into the labels.

 

I look forward to hearing how you get on.

 

Best wishes

 

John

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That looks great. Looks like rain though, best make for the booking office. When's the train due?

 

I like the boat, but if you're not happy with it and still want to add something to the quay wall, the prototype had two chambers set into it which disappeared under the quay. One of them's here: za Kyle of Lochalsh from ferry Aug 73 J3322 The metal strapping on the wooden rubbing posts is also eye-catching, one of these nice little rhythmic details which work so well in 2mm.

 

thanks for keeping posting these

Graham

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Many thanks for all your comments - I am overwhelmed by the response and have only just found a time slot to reply....

 

in more detail...

 

That fence looks very good Pete. I only noticed it as I scanned back up through the photos. Shows how much it blends in.

 

Thanks Kris - Yes its very delicate, a lovely etch and I have to be more careful now handling the layout!

 

Lovely Pete.That backscene certainly adds that Scottish atmosphere!

 

Thanks also Tom - Yes, I think it works better than the plain blue sky for this context.

 

:OI thought this was "the other project!" :D

 

Cheers Mickey...CJM is coming back soon though!

 

Nice........atmospheric backscene looks particularly good. I might try a quayside on mine.......Ian

 

Thanks Ian - Your quayside is looking fantastic at the moment...this one looks quite dull in comparison...

 

That is all looking very neat. I see what you mean about the grey paint, I think it emphasises the bleakness of the backscene, whereas the black was neat, but a little stark... now it's all "one". as the other have said, the details are really pulling this together. Glad you're cracking on to finish it all off... something to show the in-laws?

 

Jon, hi - Thanks also - We use that sort of grey a lot in our architectural projects - I think it looks quite smart for layouts too. I think the 'outlaws' won't be that interested though...best left there I feel!

 

That is fantastic. The moody backscene and the grey paint really give it an atmosphere of cold and emptyness. Photo three is really good; the view looking over the quay with the station and cloudy mountains behind is very effective.. Though the station is unfinished the shadow that falls from the baywindow really makes it feel like a cool bleak evening.

 

Thanks very much - I hadn't noticed that shadow until you pointed it out...not sure what will happen once I put the canopy on top of it...

 

Absolutely wonderful stuff Pete.That backscene looks excellent and captures the ruggedness of the terraine nicely.Presentation looks fantastic too and as others have said the grey paint adds to the bleakness and doesn't over power the actual layout itself.Bet you're really pleased with the progess you've made?Just needs a Class 153 26 idyling at the platform with few Mk 2's.Next instalment waited with baited breath!

 

Mark - Many thanks - I can do a 156 if that's any good?...the rolling stock will need a bit more work too soon...

 

Ah yes, looking very good indeed. In fact, it might even work without the station building (no, really).I forget: those letters in the text, what are they made from?

 

Thanks also Mikkel - Interesting observation...although I have wrestled with the building I feel I have to finish it! The white letters in the text are just self adhesive ones applied individually using a ruler for spacing...to be honest, I am not that keen on the font but it is difficult to find everything here in Spain and also having used it on Kyle previously and then the diorama, I thought I would continue with it!

 

Wow. After the diorama challenge and with the Paddock Wood project you are the master of these atmospheric micro layouts.Don

 

Many thanks Don - Not sure I am the master though...the master of taking on too many things and not finishing them before starting other projects perhaps?...

 

As a "proportion thing" it might well work better without the station building, or maybe a very much shortened version of it......

 

Mickey - Thanks for this - That got me thinking...but when the layout was first built it really missed something not having the station. I have already shortened the building as it starts pretty close to the foot of the ramp and ends pretty much at the end of the platform so I am not sure I can modify it any further...on the prototype it is a long building and if I can capture the essence of it and people can recognise it as an extract of Kyle then I will be happy...

 

Pete,This looks really good. Amazing how sweeping up a few details really makes the scene start to look complete.Re. attaching the backscene. I had a real fight with photographic backscenes until I partly took the Nevard route. I had the backscene encapsulated with a matt finish by a local firm in Manchester who I found by the inevitable googling. That much came from Mr.Nevard's Catcott blog but I can't remember what he used to attach it. I used display mount, the repositionable stuff; still a bit hairy applying the encapsulation but at least you can move it around a bit until it is where you want it to be. Been on for about eighteen months now with no bubbling or lifting.

 

Thanks David - Thanks also for the advice on the backscene. I will ask about that here but its pretty hard getting things that we find in the UK. I will see if I can send it to the UK but if it means further delay to the project then I may just try and apply it with display mount.

 

Looking great.

 

Many thanks Ian...

 

Excellent! The backscene really pulls the whole thing together- v. impressed.I found Photomount the best for attaching these, but its heart-in-mouth work, with no margin for error.

 

Thank you Ben - Coming from the Kyle Master, I indeed take that as a great compliment - I often look back to your layout for inspiration. Thanks for the backscene advice too - I might have to get another reserve print made!

 

Pete.That looks excellent.In your description above you mention :-"I am hoping to get back to the station soon and I have just received from Ian (Scanman) some of his self adhesive tiles (seen on the excellent Tavistock Blog) to complete the roofing."One thing I have found, but have not got round to mentioning on the Tavistock blog, is that it I think it may be important to keep solvents such as MEK and perhaps enamel paint thinners well away from the self adhesive labels. I found on the station building roof that the slate layers had lifted in a couple of places (creating a bubble effect). Although I am not sure of the exact cause, I suspect it was because I used thinned enamel paints as a wash in the weathering process and this soaked through the slate layers and disolved the stickiness of the labels. When I get to the weathering of the train shed roof, I'm going to try water based washes and try not to get too much liquid soaking into the labels.I look forward to hearing how you get on.

 

Thanks also John - Thanks for the heads up on the tiles. I think Ian had mentioned weathering powders so I will try that and perhaps make the roof as a separate add on to the main building carcass. I will report back on here...good or bad as usual with my stuff!

 

That looks great. Looks like rain though, best make for the booking office. When's the train due?I like the boat, but if you're not happy with it and still want to add something to the quay wall, the prototype had two chambers set into it which disappeared under the quay. One of them's here: http://www.flickr.co...157626232496617 The metal strapping on the wooden rubbing posts is also eye-catching, one of these nice little rhythmic details which work so well in 2mm.thanks for keeping posting these

 

Thanks Graham - Yes I had seen those chambers, but I should have really cut one of them in when I repositioned the layout on the shelf. I have painted and repainted the wall and water so many times now, I can't face taking the scalpel to it again! Let's see how it all looks at the end and see if it still needs something...

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Pete

 

Sorry to be dissenting and negative voice here, but I have to say that the backscene doesn't really work for me.

 

A combination of knowing the prototype too well - my eye is immediately drawn to the missing half of the station and from most angles knowing that you wouldn't see a mountain behind but the sea, and the way it looks like the station building is almost built into the hillside.

 

I am not sure that I can think of a solution - you might be able with a bit of clever photo backscene positioning to have the other half of the station as part of the backscene and then a shot of the sea/sky behind. Alternatively I think that I might be tempted to just have a relatively plain backscene (or even none at all).

 

The photo is actually the hills behind Kyleakin on Skye and should really be at the sea end of the station at a right angle to where it is now.

 

Sorry for being a party pooper!

 

Mike

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Often I think photographic backscenes don't look good but I was going to say exactly the opposite here. I do not know the location, however, so have no pre-formed idea of what it should look like.

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Hi Pete -

 

No comment re the suitability of the backscene - I don't know the area well enough - but as to fixing, have you tried photomounting adhesive sheets? I don't know if they are still available from good photographic shops - I used to use them regularly. They are 'iron on' - makke a sandwich - photo-adhesive sheet-backscene material, and iron away (preferably whilst SWIMBO is out!)

 

The beauty is the wieght of the iron ensures no bubbles and the material has a regular thickness so no lumps...

 

I saw Johns comment above - first time anyones mentioned it but I'll do some tests. I think he's right in his observation because one way to remove old adhesive labels is to use a solvent...

 

Regs

 

Ian

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Wow, that is looking great Pete.

There is a lifelike precision to your work which I can only wish to emulate.

You have now made me wonder whether a boxfile layou might be a possibility for those blue diesels of mine....

Chris

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Apologies for the delay in responding to these comments...was away for the weekend...here goes...

 

Sorry to be dissenting and negative voice here, but I have to say that the backscene doesn't really work for me.A combination of knowing the prototype too well - my eye is immediately drawn to the missing half of the station and from most angles knowing that you wouldn't see a mountain behind but the sea, and the way it looks like the station building is almost built into the hillside.I am not sure that I can think of a solution - you might be able with a bit of clever photo backscene positioning to have the other half of the station as part of the backscene and then a shot of the sea/sky behind. Alternatively I think that I might be tempted to just have a relatively plain backscene (or even none at all).The photo is actually the hills behind Kyleakin on Skye and should really be at the sea end of the station at a right angle to where it is now.Sorry for being a party pooper!

 

No need to apologise Mike - Fair comments indeed.

 

It's a tricky one, as making a half relief building is always going to give yourself problems...I did originally consider a mirror to try and complete the rest of the station...but went off that idea too. Not sure really how to move on from this, but perhaps it would be worth me completing the station building and seeing how it looks once the canopy is on etc, as I can always remove the backscene and go back to the plain blue sky. Fair point about seeing the river behind, but I guess the view from the platform level is different from the road bridge as well, and on a model its difficult to know where to pitch it. One thought I had was to overlay a pice of tracing paper over it and see how that looks...perhaps it might fade it more into the distance?...

 

 

Often I think photographic backscenes don't look good but I was going to say exactly the opposite here. I do not know the location, however, so have no pre-formed idea of what it should look like.

 

Thanks Rich...Not withstanding Mike's comments above its difficult to know what would be appropriate really. Obviously the whole model is a compromise as its a half model of a station compressed into an overall width of 135mm...I never normally used to make backscenes as I was never a big fan of them...but only started when people asked how I was going to deal with the backscene!...Needs more thought I think...

 

 

No comment re the suitability of the backscene - I don't know the area well enough - but as to fixing, have you tried photomounting adhesive sheets? I don't know if they are still available from good photographic shops - I used to use them regularly. They are 'iron on' - makke a sandwich - photo-adhesive sheet-backscene material, and iron away (preferably whilst SWIMBO is out!)The beauty is the wieght of the iron ensures no bubbles and the material has a regular thickness so no lumps...I saw Johns comment above - first time anyones mentioned it but I'll do some tests. I think he's right in his observation because one way to remove old adhesive labels is to use a solvent...

 

Thanks Ian - I will try and find them here...buts its hard enough finding spraymount / photomount sometimes! Thanks for the comments re the slates/tiles...I was actually going to use weathering powders myself...drop me a PM if you discover something regarding your tests...

 

 

Wow, that is looking great Pete.There is a lifelike precision to your work which I can only wish to emulate.You have now made me wonder whether a boxfile layou might be a possibility for those blue diesels of mine....Chris

 

Thanks Chris...a boxfile, a class 25 and two coaches, a class 24...there must be a small layout in the making there...take a boxfile and some scraps of cardboard and see what you can come up with...they are fun little projects...

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Further to Mikes comments on the backscene I wonder if instead of a layer of tracing paper on the backscene, it would be better if it was slightly hazy / distant instead?

 

I have dropped the image into paint and had a fiddle around with the contrast and as you can see below, the change from the original...not sure if it is any better though?

 

EDIT: Scrap this...I still can't find a way to upload images halfway through a blog...I will make a new blog entry instead.... :banghead:

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Yes Pete, agree that is frustrating, as it stops you being able to contribute more effectively to posts.

To reply to one of Mikkels as I wanted to, I had to post a picture on my own blog. Bizarre!

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