Jump to content
  • entries
    125
  • comments
    1,951
  • views
    182,625

A pair of early livery opens!

wenlock

1,566 views

As a bit of light relief from track planning, I've built a couple of Cooper Craft wagons. As I wanted them in the early livery, I've changed the axle boxes and brakes for something more appropriate for the era. I've always really rated Cooper Craft kits and built most of the range in my 4mm days. I only wish the 4mm Minks were available in 7mm scale! I'm not a fan of the buffers supplied with the kits, so they have been replaced with turned, sprung buffers from Slaters Plastikard.

 

GWR 4 plank open

blogentry-5869-0-75075900-1341336835_thumb.jpg

 

GWR 3 plank open

blogentry-5869-0-68681300-1341336883_thumb.jpg

  • Like 17
  • Craftsmanship/clever 2


13 Comments


Recommended Comments

My first reply disappeared into the ether...

 

I do like your interpretation of the faded red livery. What paint did you use?

 

WEP do a nice range of Minks suitable for your period, from the V4, V5, V6 'iron' mink, V7 mink 'C', and a V12.

Share this comment


Link to comment

I've always liked the range and wished there was more. The mouldings in both 4mm and 7mm are superb.

 

Quite agree re the 7mil minks, with the end packs as well the combinations are endless!

 

I like the 'sacks', how did you do them?

 

The finish and weathering...........top drawer!

Share this comment


Link to comment

My first reply disappeared into the ether...

 

I do like your interpretation of the faded red livery. What paint did you use?

 

WEP do a nice range of Minks suitable for your period, from the V4, V5, V6 'iron' mink, V7 mink 'C', and a V12.

Hi Adrian,

Glad you like my attempt at the livery, all very subjective obviously, but based upon the red oxide pigments available during the turn of the last century, it's my best guess! I use Humbrol Enamels for the majority of my modelling and in this instance used a 50/50 mix of numbers 100 and 70 as a base coat. Once this is dry, I wash a dilute mix of thinners and dark grey over the surface. Capillary action "sucks" the paint into the plank detail and around the boltheads and helps with shading the paint. I usually finish by dry brushing highlights with a golden brown mix.

 

I've built a couple of the WEP minks and thought they were well thought out, accurate kits. I'll post some pics of them, I just hope I've got the numbers right this time!

 

Best wishes

 

Dave

  • Like 1

Share this comment


Link to comment

I've always liked the range and wished there was more. The mouldings in both 4mm and 7mm are superb.

 

Quite agree re the 7mil minks, with the end packs as well the combinations are endless!

 

I like the 'sacks', how did you do them?

 

The finish and weathering...........top drawer!

Hi Ratty,

Sounds like we are both fans of the Cooper Craft range, I'd love to know what happened to the guy who mastered them, obviously a really talented guy.

 

I'm glad you liked the sacks, I carved them from dental wax and then made a silicone mould and poured them up in casting resin.

 

Best wishes

 

Dave

Share this comment


Link to comment

Glad you like my attempt at the livery, all very subjective obviously, but based upon the red oxide pigments available during the turn of the last century, it's my best guess! I use Humbrol Enamels for the majority of my modelling and in this instance used a 50/50 mix of numbers 100 and 70 as a base coat.

 

Thanks! I'll be borrowing that brew and variations thereof for my fleet.

  • Like 1

Share this comment


Link to comment
Guest Simon Dunkley

Posted

Must admit I have simply used red oxide primer in the past, weathered with a wash of thin light grey. (I will rummage around to dig out a photo) I did ask a friend who is inthe Borad Gauge Society about all this, and he told me that someone had conducted trials with a variety of shades, types and brands and then taken photos in black and white through a filter in an attempt to replicate the emulsion plates of 19th century cameras. The idea was, of course, to see which one came out with the closest shade of grey (were there 50?) to an original. On printing, they turned out to be identical.

 

Now, a question. When painting wagons grey, the GWR applied the colour all over. I have assumed that this was also done with red oxide, although Nigel Digby's article in BRM had the underframe in black, as you have done. Does anyone know which was the "correct" way? I did ask Nigel, and he freely admitted to not knowing which would be right, as there seems to be a lack of information.

 

Anyone know?

  • Like 1

Share this comment


Link to comment

I thought consensus was that the red colour only covered the wood and that the metal work was black. It is quite probably that no-one really knows.

Share this comment


Link to comment

The point of contention is whether the red should extend to metal solebars and headstocks. Given that many/most vehicles of the era (c 1880) had wooden underframes, and that it was common practice for body colour to be used on solebars and headstocks on private owner wagons, the use of red on metal solebars and headstocks would seem to be a logical and consistent choice.

 

Not that logic has any connection with history of course!

  • Like 1

Share this comment


Link to comment

It probably depends on the instructions too. If it was "paint that bit red and those bits black" then that would of course be different to "paint wood red and paint metal black".

Share this comment


Link to comment

I know this is 5 years old now, so apologies, but from where did you obtain the grease axle boxes?

Share this comment


Link to comment
I know this is 5 years old now, so apologies, but from where did you obtain the grease axle boxes?

 

Hi Harry, I’m afraid I can’t remember! The most likely scenario was that I made a silicone mould taken from some white metal castings.

 

Sorry I can’t be of more help!

 

Best wishes

 

Dave

Share this comment


Link to comment

No problem, cheers Dave. I shall have to get looking; strange there doesn't seem to be any readily available?

Share this comment


Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.