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Showing content with the highest reputation on 29/04/12 in all areas

  1. 120428_4-track_DSC_4215_BW, a photo by nevardmedia on Flickr. Sunday morning's bit of silliness is the replication of a stretch of mainline in South Wales with an ex-GWR pannier tank in possession of a rake of empties just having left the mainline. The 9F flying along behind has a load of freshly filled wagons heading for somewhere distant or maybe just Cardiff Docks. Sunlight has just started to penetrate the fog and pollution – also known as smog it was a typical feature of industrial Britain in the 1950’s and 1960’s. In those days everyone used to smoke, mostly because the nicoti
    8 points
  2. Update - It's been a strange time of late... The following tale of woe's hopefully describes what's been happening here in sunny economic disaster ridden Spain. Having remade the mini sliding traverser beneath the dries covered area which serves as the loco release, this was wired with a very Heath Robinson kind of affair, which thankfully will be hidden from view and work then turned to redoing the inset track...again. Having failed last time using a clay product I found in an art shop here, I decided a new approach was required. Firstly the trackwork was reconstructed and instead
    6 points
  3. When I started railway modelling back when Adam was a lad if you wanted decent looking rolling stock you had to either scratch build it or use kits. The only RTR stuff available was either Tri Ang or Hornby which in those days were intended to be sold more as toys for boys rather than railway models. Since then RTR stuff has come on leaps and bounds each year the accuracy and standard of detail improves. Take this Bachmann ex Southern Railway Van, The chassis is superb. Long gone are the big moulded details like brake levers and brake gear. Even the vacuum cylinder has levers and rodd
    6 points
  4. 120429_4-track_DSC_4245, a photo by nevardmedia on Flickr. During the long hazy summer of '69, D6313 is captured near Great Wishford on the Wylye Valley route with a Westbury bound goods. The highly regarded Dapol Class 22 certainly looks the part on a secondary mainline with just a few wagons in tow. The unkempt finish and hazy light I think capturing the feel of the era which is now getting on for half a century ago. This is of course the era of free love, outdoor concerts and drug induced popular culture. Well, for a few dozen rich kids in Chelsea and Bath who could afford not to work
    6 points
  5. Much of my occasional modelling of late has been very much CAD based, with lots of staring (and occasionally muffled swearing) at a computer screen! These projects are making good progress, with a new 'face' for the bridge and a fresh N gauge Class 139 currently in the works at Shapeways. I hope to have the new 'Parry' 139 ready for the DEMU Showcase event at Burton to run the branchline service on 'Kinlet Wharf'.. fingers crossed. I am also making progress on designs for boilers and associated fittings with Google Sketchup, which has its limitations for anything curved or circular, but bi
    6 points
  6. Hi all You may have noticed that the last week has probably been rather damp underfoot. But last weekend, for a few glorious hours it wasnt too bad. Our first proper run of the year (yes i know its april already!) saw us go down to swindon track, in coate water country park. Each year they hold two 5 inch open days for just 5 inch gauge engines, we've been along to a few now, and each time taken a load of wagons. We meet up with a few mates from the area and have a bit of a run. The track is about 7/8 km long, includes 3 road station, station by pass, diamond crossi
    3 points
  7. This is my first blog entry. Hope I've got the hang of it! After what seems like an eternity, 46245 City of London is ready for the paintshop. The last few snags were sorted today. The first problem was rough running and I sorted this out with a drop of oil on the gears and driving wheel axles. The other issue was that the loco was getting jammed on curves. I finally found that the front wheels of the bogie were catching against the front footstep. This was mainly because the bogie was mounted fractionally too far forward. I 'moved' the slot in the bogie spacer for the securing screw forw
    2 points
  8. Having fitted track on two levels I thought I'd better get some power back on and make sure I could still drive trains round and round. This hasn't been possible since the original fiddleyard was removed in February. I wasn't happy with the idea of just feeding power to all the levels all the time as this seemed like a recipe for disaster. I could just imagine selecting the wrong loco on the DCC and then driving it off the top level when it wasn't aligned with the exit track! The solution I've adopted is to feed the power to each level through a microswitch which is only closed when the level
    1 point
  9. Another few blissful happy hours playing with SketchUp has resulted in another model almost ready to go off to Shapeways. This time I'm trying to tackle a GWR Outside Framed Brake Van. The body work is now complete, but I intend drawing up the solebars and headstocks so that all I'll have to do is add the W Irons, springs, axleboxes, brake gear, buffers, foot boards and the handrails. The images below show screen shots of the Brake Van in SketchUp. I don't know whether they will print up very well (they'll certainly be very delicate), but I've also added the lamp irons. Since
    1 point
  10. A two-week course in Scotland provided an ideal spring-board for a bit of recording during the middle weekend. Various Scottish modellers have been asking me to record the sliding doors on a 303 and adapt my 304 project accordingly. However, with the help of the hard-working chaps at Bon'ess I've managed to go well beyond that and record almost all the sounds that the 303's made, including horns, driver & passenger doors, hustle alarm, main & auxiliary compressors, guard's right away bell, aws, oil pump (which they had instead of traction motor blowers), brake releases, main contactor
    1 point
  11. Hi Pete, I don't ever recall seeing trees like that down at Moorwater! Be interesting seeing a Class 66 queeze between those! Excellent stuff though and shows some dogged determination. I love the shots of the dries themselves. There is no doubting the location-Wenford Bridge isn't it? Cheers, Mark
    1 point
  12. Hi Pete. From that final photo, looks like you've cracked it............... Looking good! Hope the stock is all salvageable. Been there, got the spare parts! Tom.
    1 point
  13. Good to see that you're getting the tricky jobs out of the way - they can really hold up progress. Some people might have been driven to distraction and gone off to do some modelling of Scotland or some such. Are you sure those big white spheres aren't just a bit closer to the track than last time?
    1 point
  14. Yikes! Some trials and tribulations there Peter. I had similar disappointments when working on my Frankland tram track - I know how protracted and frustrating this sort of process can be. It looks like it's starting to work-out for you now and hopefully will be worth the effort in the long-run Just one thing though - with those egg-shaped trees I still can't get away from thinking I'm looking at an episode of the 60s series 'The Prisoner' ... I keep expecting one of them to start bouncing around and chasing me down the road!
    1 point
  15. looking good a little surprised you didn't opt for plaster between the check rails any reason why not ?
    1 point
  16. I’m waiting for some araldite to cure on the fifth Banana van, - you remember, the one that is having a sprung chassis. There’s no doubt that araldite is one of the finest adhesives, particularly the old fashioned 24 hour type, but that curing time and lack of initial grip can be a pain. In today’s case the araldite’s job is to fix a lead weight to the plastic body of the van as a part-floor. The weight is drilled and tapped for 8BA and as the thread in lead is likely to strip, an 8BA nut is soldered to the lead. This 8BA hole MUST be exactly on the body centre-line, to match a sim
    1 point
  17. Dan. Its nice to see a Castle in 'Great Western' livery as Hornby seem a bit shy on doing this.I would fit etched plates myself and take that hideous front coupling off.You could make her better with a few tweaks.
    1 point
  18. More progress! The solebars were bent to shape using nothing more than a vice and two steel rules as bending bars then they were joined to the buffer beams using 188 deg solder. The angle plates were then added using 145 deg solder. You will see from the photo that the ends of the angle plates stuck out beyond the edge of the buffer beam - soon sorted with a file! This assembly was then fitted to the superstructure and the buffers added. Starting to look like a Sentinel now
    1 point
  19. I must admit I forget to read the blogs most of the time, but just stumbled across yours and read it all. I love the idea of the school fundraising show. As an ex-PTA chairman myself, I had thought about this many times myself but I managed to keep my mouth shut fortunately! Let me know when the date is confirmed and I will see if I can help in any way. COME ON YOU RAMS !!! Regards Dave
    1 point
  20. Well, I have completed the rear lamp irons, this has been a lot of guess work. In the photo's I have you can only see the one behind the buffer. The position of the others is pure guestimation. On the A1 A1X the middle lamp irons are generally an extended one. Fixed just behind the buffer one. So if anyone can prove my positions right or wrong I would be grateful. I also fitted the toolbox behind the bunker. I am very suprised I could find no photo's of one with a hasp on the lid to keep it shut, must rely on the weight of the lid. The only detail to be seen is a weather strip at the top, so I
    1 point
  21. There's something rather magical about Graeme King's modelling. The ability to turn a sow's ear into a silk purse - such as a commission he took on for me, making a Hornby Railroad A4 into a Gresley W1 last year. This time around, it really is just amazing. I suggested to Graeme quite a while back that an A2/3 could be made from the latest Bachmann A2, and he agreed; he had been thinking on similar lines. We came to an agreement, whereby I would supply a Bachmann A2 for him to use as the prototype for a conversion kit, and I would in return get said prototype to add to my collect
    1 point
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