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  1. After lying idle for nearly a year and a half Kirkby Malham saw some life last week. I ran some of my outside framed engines and even after all that time they ran surprisingly well. you might say ‘another busy day at the office’ With a quiet bit of shunting. Finally the stopping passenger departs for Bradford (Market Street) behind Kirtley 2-4-0. L These three locos ages total over 150 years. The 0-6-0 and 0-4-4 well tanks were built in 1966 and the 2-4-0 in 1972 during my intensive engine building phase The engines and carriages, except the four wheeled brake behind the tender, were painted and lined by my good friend Larry Goddard. The quality of his painting has stood the test of time. Derek
    30 points
  2. The Tanfield Railway today with photos from the late 1980s. Obviously there have been changes since then, Andrews House is now a functioning station for example and there is a lot more covered accommodation for the stock. As most of you know the railway is just to the south of Gateshead, so not too far from home for me. It's a pleasant 40 minute drive. Andrews House HL No2 28th May 88 C9469.jpg Andrews House RSH Cochrane 28th Aug 89 C13728.jpg Marley Hill AEG NCB 9 ex Harton 28th May 88 C9475.jpg Marley Hill Armstrong Whitwoth 2 28th May 88 C9471.jpg Marley Hill RSH 21 28th May 88 C9480.jpg Marley Hill Hudswell Clarke Irwell Marley Hill to Sunniside 28th Aug 89 C13741.jpg This is one of my favourite photos of the line. David
    30 points
  3. That was a pleasurable sideline, done alongside one I had been chewing over for some time - the Stanier Black Four that was planned for the Highland lines. Its initial build was pushed back in 1934 for the Fives and they were found to be more than adequate for the job, so the smaller engine never made the light of day. I looked over the Bachmann Stanier Mogul but getting a leading bogie under the cylinders was going to be more problematic, so the thing stalled, not for the first time. However, it dawned on me that the loco drive Black Five still used the too short original Rovex era body, so one was obtained to see if this would be an option. turned out it was, but not as simple as I had hoped because the upgraded chassis now had 6' drivers, unlike the smaller ones on the earlier version. nevertheless, I decided to make it the basis of the conversion, so the boiler was cut loose and lowered as much as I could on the footplate, and the undercut at the smokebox door incorporated, which makes a big visual difference to the looks of it, and the newer version as well. The cab was replaced by a GBL one and the drivers were spare Hornby Radials from my dormant Small Ben build on the Five's axles, but with "normal" Hornby crankpins as the Radials have a bossed one that holds the coupling rods out about 2mm from the drivers. A Bachmann Crab tender was the aft half of the loco. Here it is on its first finished visit to its new home shed, and another bit of alternative history is added to my expanding fantasy world... Couple of shots showing the difference in size between the Four and the Five - I tried it with a Stanier tender but it just looked like an old Triang version with it, whereas the smaller tender seemed more in proportion with it.
    28 points
  4. Forgot to process any new pictures, so the image store is empty. To give you something to look at, here is one from the archives.
    23 points
  5. On Friday we had some WCML in Scotland photos, ending up at Glasgow Central. Here are some more taken there on visits to Glasgow Exhibition. Glasgow Central 107026 2nd March 91 C15623.jpg Glasgow Central 318252 2nd March 91 C15632.jpg Glasgow Central Class 86 24th Feb 95 C19959.jpg Glasgow Central 303009 24th Feb 95 C19961.jpg Glasgow Central Class 86 and 318268 24th Feb 95 C20081.jpg 86416 David
    22 points
  6. From the warehouse window.
    21 points
  7. This afternoon we catch a Tavistock Junction bound freight train of vans hauled by one of the Newton Granges, 6813 Eastbury Grange. I'm amazed Hornby have never done this livery on this model.
    18 points
  8. A Special thank you to Tony and Mo for a lovely day. Always worth the drive down to Little Bytham. Some photographs I took took this afternoon (with Tony's guidance). I'll be editing the video footage shot by Tony tomorrow, which looks to be something special!
    17 points
  9. Work started yesterday on the Bermuda Triangle. So named as this is where the trains disappear I’m determined to make this triangle a big feature now although it was never part of the original plan. With 20ft of fields at its widest part I’m making the scenery removable over the lower tracks which are hidden, and the rest on the aforementioned trolleys which will push into place to fill the space. Today I’ve been making the removable top covers from ply for the apex of the Bermuda triangle. Apart from ply I’ve used a lot of foam board to block out the light as I want the long tunnels totally black. The temporary bridge in the pics (yet to be sawn in half) will be the third scenic break - the back scene wrapping around this and the second bridge/scenic break nearby. A road will link the two bridges. The river will be extended and curve away (and be removable as it’ll be built on a trolley.) Should have it done in a couple weeks.
    17 points
  10. Snow in the ranges yesterday but this morning was cloudless, if a little bracing, for our walk. Innisfallen Castle was built during 1903-1905 by Henry Hastings Willis, a former Member and Speaker of the Parliament of New South Wales and is now heritage-listed. Here is it with the sparkling waters of Sugarloaf Bay North Arm in the foreground... ...all of which is only about 5km from the Sydney CBD. At times like this I realise how lucky we are to live in this part of the world. Back to business this afternoon. The approach to St Enodoc Station from Porthmellyn Road needs to be converted from single- to double track so I removed three points from the old board 4 in readiness for this. The one in the extreme lower right corner will be re-used at Polperran as I'm now only going to have one siding here, for the camping coach. The other two points need to move about 90mm to the right of their previous positions. The small round holes are for the point motor operating wires and the small round holes with a slot are for the signals. The slot allows the operating arm with its choc-block connector to pass through the baseboard. The bigger round hole at the top left is where the wires to the uncoupler control panel emerged. I've cut the panel and its mount away too. Finally, the large rectangular gap at the top right is where the old electrical lever frame was. The new Modratec frame will go in roughly the same place. Here's the underside of the old board 4 with only the signal current regulators and uncouplers in place. To round things off, here are the equivalent photos of the other half of St Enodoc station, the old board 5, which doesn't need any track alterations. When they're installed on the new layout these two boards will be joined together permanently. Back to signal painting later.
    16 points
  11. Busy time at Helmsdale - two Hikers waiting for work....Not all as it seems - they are GBL static models breathed on a little, and ready to head for the base of the Pop Up engine shed, which is almost done.
    16 points
  12. G'Day Folks A couple more from around the layout. D3 & D2 move a heavy train, plus it saves on line occupation. D2, 4321 stops to pick up passengers at Edgwarebury& Watling Pk. Last, but not least, Small Atlantic 3271, hauls a heavy 7 coach train up from Kings Cross, including a Tourist open twin, which I have finally managed to get running right. manna
    15 points
  13. Last work photo for the week, possession on last night in wilnecote near Tamworth with 66763 seen at end of the job for me and heading home As you can see they were relaying and reballasting the adjacent line, my train had the spoil wagons on collecting the spent ballast thats it for a week now, defiantly got a week away from work, Caledonian sleeper tonight to Inverness then hire car back down the west coast of Scotland via oban, Glasgow and Dumfries and Galloway back to the caravan in cumbria on Friday
    14 points
  14. Please excuse the diversion, but one of the great things about fora and our modern age of readily available Information, is that historical research becomes easier and easier. People will often go way beyond reasonable levels to help. When a photo such as this is available, (courtesy LTMuseum archives) it would be churlish not to model it. There are a few more detail signs, lamps and posters to be fitted as well as the newsagents / tobacconist on the retail unit on the left. Still quite a lot to do before completion... Tim
    14 points
  15. A final few of 6813 on her van train for today. Should be able to finish the top fence this week thanks to a kind gesture from @pirouets elsewhere on the forum.
    13 points
  16. I've now finished the second Hornby 3-planker, as seen above. It started life as this. After removing the lettering from the body I repainted it with Humbrol 106, the colour I've settled on for LMWR wagons. The buffer beams were also painted, but I left the solebars as they were already the right colour (or close enough). I removed the brake shoes from one side to further age the wagon. Transfers are a mixture of Microscale waterslide and HMRS Methfix. The finished model.
    13 points
  17. Pull Push just leaving or just approaching Brasted, you decide.
    13 points
  18. Continuing..... Room for more spurs at the other end of the FY. The E.Lincs set lives here, as does the M&GN set, and some goods stock which tacks onto the back of trains in the FY when needed. M&GN stock is also out working. In the background is an artic five set which forms most of the stopping trains to and from London. That sits in one of two spurs I could fit in beween Up and Down FY. Most of these locals are fixed sets which represent all of the services on the route concerned, but I can vary things from loose stock when I feel like doing so, or when I know a specific formation is required. Other loose stock also occupies two of the roads in the FY which are easiest to reach. So how does it work? Stuff from spurs is just manually run into FY1, loco attached from shed box, and off it goes. Same procedure in reverse when the train comes back to FY1. Now to trains that have to be made up from a combination of cassettes and loose stock. This morning I started running things from where I had left off last time, expecting that it wouldn't be long before I needed to do this. However, the first 11 movements didn't need it. Some were fixed rakes that live in the main FY, and others were locals dealt with as described above. Eventually though, my ancient laptop showed me this. so, two cassettes in this formation, the rest loose stock. This probably needs more fiddling about than most, but I timed it, and had the whole train assembled with loco at the front and ready to go within two minutes, even though there were 8 separate actions to be performed. For me, to know that what I now see running round is the correct formation according to the official records is well worth the time that it took to achieve it, both in planning, analysis, and actual physical movements. Trevor and Jon, I'm sure I haven't answered all your queries, so please do ask again if there is clarification or more detail needed.
    13 points
  19. A couple of panniers in repose, waiting for another one: The new arrival:
    13 points
  20. Always fun to put prototype and model together. The Randells Road board is now at home, to try out the building in situ. Should make for some atmospheric pictures in the area. Need some more vehicles... Tim
    12 points
  21. Between rain showers, I managed to get a shot of 33012 coming over Yard Lane Crossing from Seven Up Junction.
    12 points
  22. Hello Marc! How's things? Hope South Wales is treating you well during these strange time. I'm alright thanks - going through a bit of a period of contemplating what I want to do with my professional life but outside of that, all is well. It would be good to catch up properly sometime once things return to normality, perhaps at a show or even for dinner somewhere? Whilst I'm here, a few updates from the workbench. I recently picked up the new EFE Rail Clayton from Kernow - it's nice to see another dinosaur diesel available in 2mm on the RTR market, even if it's one that's waaaaay out of region for anything I'm planning. It's a nice model and I'll bet my first-born that it's come from the same factory as Dapol's 22 given the similarity in construction. It even has the slightly misshapen BR double arrows that the D6300 carried. My plan for this one is to model 8598 in it's RTC days - I understand that it visited Swindon once to collect Test Car Hermes after conversion so I'll use that as a vague justification for bring on the Western Region. I've not done too much so far; just given the chassis a coat of matt black, filled in the headcodes, changed the arrows and tweaked the glazing slightly to try and remove the prismatic effect. Before... After! I could be quite tempted by a little shunting plank based around Edinburgh - a couple of Claytons and a few other early 70's diesels would be neat. Outside of the Clayton and Hermes seen above; I've barely touched 2mm for a while. A batch of 7mm Cavalier's are slowly coming together - from the A-pillar backwards they're a Schuco diecast model with some home-brew resin fronts grafted on. The idea is to build a model of every car that I strip for bits to keep mine going; I diecast shrine of sorts I guess. YKB 348W was the first car stripped in a scrapyard in Bordon on a scorching hot summers day a few years back; whilst LBH 78V was found in a yard near Evesham last February where it rained and snowed for every moment we were there. I think both cars have features on this thread. The headlamp lenses on the above two aren't quite right - they're a bit too square and missing the chamfer that blends into the shape of the bonnet. After a lot of messing around, I've found casting them in clear UV resin works well. Normal casting rubber moulds didn't work quite right as it seems to 'scratch' easily which was carried over to the UV resin moulding - in the end, I made a polished master and pushed it into Blu-Tac to form a one time mould. It worked really well and something I will experiment more in the future. My other half recently told me I needed a book end as my books on one of my shelves kept toppling over. So I've been busy creating the below - I don't think it's quite what she had in mind; but I like it! Some friends and I have spent a fair bit of time in Wuppertal as a base for visiting Intermodellbau and doing various Germany railtours - there's a top brauhaus in the old art-deco Swimming Pool there (between some very sketch parts I should add) and it's become a bit of an adopted home-from-home. Probably it's most famous for it's Dangle-bahn suspended tramway. A few years ago at Intermodelbau, I picked up a laser cut kit for a section of trackwork and a model of one of their new units that were being launched at the time. I've never really known what to do with it but after a bit of thinking it's become a bookend. The Wuppertal book is false - it's pages have been glued together and a slot cut to support that end of the trackwork. Inside the book is a more traditional metal bookend which then sits under the rest of the books. The original plan was to have a book on elephants as the left hand support as a nod to Tuffi (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuffi) but, much like Tuffi, it was much to big to work! Finally, miles from 2mm, but rail-related. The only piece of furniture I inherited from the previous owner of the house was a set of dining room tables and chairs - they've had a hard couple of years, being covered in dust, paint, beer and take-aways as I'd planned to throw them away. However, I've slowly become attached to them but I've never had much love for the worn, cigarette-burnt brown fabric on them. A little head-scratching and some inspiration from a friend pointed me towards some BR Trojan moquette as a hard wearing idea for recovering them. After a couple of days of beavering away, I'm pleased with them! More soon. Take care, Pix
    12 points
  23. 'tinternet is back up to speed, not that it's all that fast here, so here's a photo of louvers mark 3.
    11 points
  24. So I have finally have the chance to sort the CVs on 31444. Changing CV 50 to 1 improved the running no end changing CV 182 to get the sound volume down made no difference but changing CV161 which is at the top of the volume list for engine start up has the loco now runs and sounds a lot better. Thanks for the help. Cheers Peter.
    11 points
  25. Thus creating a world shortage of static grass!
    11 points
  26. As just mentioned, a splendid time spent with Retford today. I took along four locos; the J6 just shown, and the following three.................... Here's the modified Bachmann D11 which Ray Chessum altered to EM for me (I defy anyone to be able to see that the mainframes are too narrow at this range!). It performed impeccably, so thanks again Ray. It's now on indefinite loan to Retford. Strictly speaking, it's carrying the wrong headlamp code, since the rake is either parcels or empty stock. I also took along Tom Wright's Judith Edge Hunslet (it's on delivery from Leeds!). Though we didn't actually time this at its slowest speed (less than two mph), we calculated that it would take at least an hour to circumnavigate the GN bit of Retford! What a fantastic kit this is. Mike Edge (when he gave it to Tom) said it could be built by a teenager - and it was................ I think Sandra will paint it. I also took along Tom's twin-motored (O Gauge Mashimas) unfinished prototype 'Deltic'. At 50 mph it just roared round. We attached 29 carriages (half and half modified RTR and kit-built), and it made absolutely no difference to its speed. On a previous occasion, towards 70 carriages were tried (yes, five of Roy's full-length trains!), but the huge rake wanted to collapse inwards on the end curves, so the mucking-about was abandoned. Robert Carroll took some moving footage on his phone which he says he'll post on here. More Retford pictures tomorrow.........................
    10 points
  27. Some DMUs from the 1970s and 1980s in urban landscapes, crossing the High Level Bridge over the Tyne. I think I might get away with it, they are so far away you can't read the numbers. (This was mentioned as a necessity for this type of picture a page or two back!) Trevor
    10 points
  28. I've finished plonking plywood, so I had a twiddle with track instead. I am requesting official membership of the Peco Point Benders and Track Wranglers Association. I then ran a test train, featuring a big Bell end this time. Things went well. It took 7 and a half minutes to complete a journey from the station round the layout and back to the station. Not bad for a 14 x 7 shed. I was wondering what I'd done with a tracksetta curve, but it's ok, the Big GM found it....
    10 points
  29. Unfortunately this isn't a report on progress with my 2mm model - there hasn't been any! Instead, here is a photo of the prototype I took last night at Bolton Abbey, at the end of a "Sherlock Holmes Murder Mystery" evening. Our passengers were in the station buffet, finding out "whodunnit"... Thankfully I had managed to keep the smoke down and the pressure up, so the murder victim wasn't me! First coach behind the loco is the 12-wheel LNWR directors saloon, freshly repainted and looking fabulous.
    10 points
  30. OK, for Trevor and for Jon 4470, (can't remember how to multiquote at the moment), here's an attempt to explain further. Stock storage facilities first. An 18 road fiddle yard, with spurs of various lengths wherever they can be squeezed in. a purpose built cassette box, four shelves, each holding 12 cassettes. Loose stock housed in drawers and sundry other places. As far as possible, all of this is located in one corner of the room, and close to the cassette spur. Here's afew hand held and probably shaky pictures. A cassette in position to be offloaded onto Road 1 of the FY, which is always kept empty for making up of trains. a section of the cassette box, CP12A being the one on the spur. I don't like the number between 12 and 14, so it becomes 12A. 12A now happily tucked away. One of the drawers. This one holds loose brake coaches, while the one above holds SKs, SOs and MK1 CKs. There's another box on top of Kings Cross shed which holds more CKs and some FKs. Spurs next to the cassette road hold stock for short trains mainly, for example a Midland 4 set which is out working at the moment. The two occupied ones hold Gresley and Thomson SKs, which are needed for a lot of East Coast secondary formations. Right, I've reached image limit, so another post will follow.
    10 points
  31. A view through the railings. Cement wagons parked in the goods yard head shunt.
    10 points
  32. I've done another one and tried a bit of tidying up of the yellow one this morning, although neither are fully satisfactory, but now off to the shops for the Sunday papers:
    10 points
  33. My take on the almost built small 4-6-0 for the Highland lines that was superseded by the success of the larger Class Fives - Railroad Black Five loco with lowered boiler, GBL cab and Hornby Radial drivers pulling a Bachmann Crab tender...
    10 points
  34. Fabulous work Hendie. It just gets better. I assume that when you go back to aircraft modelling you will have a log on an appropriate forum. If so, drop a link here and I for one will come looking. Along with my railway modelling I have been slowly progressing a 1:72 sailing ship. I was updating a log on modelshipworld until a spell in hospital brought it all to a grinding halt. I like looking at other model forums because the guys from other branches of modelling have skills from which we in railway modelling can learn and vica versa . I was able to demonstrate railway modelling type skills with a model of a ships stove scratch built from nickel silver. The lower pulley on it has 4 spokes and is 2mm in diameter. Great fun to make. My specs in the one photo give an idea of scale. My apologies for the diversion. Back to Pegasus. Ian.
    10 points
  35. The Norseman is seen this evening, a KX duty, with Sandwich at the front today. Today I took delivery of some new couplings. Little time to try them out, but first impression is that they are just what I've been looking for. More details tomorrow, when I've been able to do a better analysis.
    10 points
  36. There are some things which just don’t scale, no matter what you do the real thing looks wrong in model form. Smoke and water are the obvious ones, but I’l add another. Dust. Scaled down they are not particles, they are lumps. So I have been enjoying running the railway a bit, collecting info and deciding what to build next. However I couldn’t help noticing that the station had become a bit dusty and once you have noticed it it sticks in your eye. Time for some cleaning, after all we can’t have the folk from Helensburgh passing through and thinking how mucky Glaswegians are. In previous blogs I have described my penchant for using magnets and the like so that things can be removed for maintenance. Time to put my theories to the test. Notice anything missing? There it all is on the bench ready for a really good clean. While I was at it I did a bit of lightproofing using Wenlocks tip of self adhesive foil and added some missing drainage. Windows. There are rather a lot of them. Oh well, box of cotton buds and a bowl of water. Took a while but there they are, all nice and clean. Doing that in situ would be well beyond my eyesight. All back safely in place. Oh, and just for fun. Mind you a few of those net curtains could do with a trip to the steamie.
    9 points
  37. Third example now painted and pantograph etc. added. Still need to add cab front handrails but will leave the paint to cure overnight first. Cheers Darius
    9 points
  38. You get the wilful misunderstanding prize again Clive. Next time, if there is one, the prize will be to be locked in a room with a person of my choice for two hours. I won't say who, but just be afraid, be very afraid.
    9 points
  39. Another section removed overnight. This leaves just two sections in the proximity of the West Coast Main Line behind Duncombe Street. During the week the two remaining sections close to the former Buckingham Road section have been prepared for removal. Looks like the high winds on Friday may have influenced why the section to the north was not removed last week.
    9 points
  40. I'll be off to see Retford soon, and give the new J6 a good run. I think my altering of the spectacles has made a big difference to the proportion of the 'plate and their relationship to the boiler. Note how large the spectacles are on the real thing.................... I'll take some more Retford photographs today, and show some on here........................
    9 points
  41. Thanks Ian. I've already started my next project but unfortunately, it's not train related. I'm going back to aircraft modeling again. Won't you guys be glad to see the back of me? This week was a bit busy so I did not get as much time on Pegasus as I had hoped, however, I managed to lock myself away today and get some work accomplished - it's getting Sssoooooooo close I can taste it. I wanted to get the interior done before I started adding greeblies to the outside as it was a certainty that if greeblies were on the outside, I was going to knock them off as I worked on the ceiling panels. First order of the day was to fit the chrome down-lights in the bar - easy job for once They were followed by three more down-lights in the ceiling panel, in turn followed by two brass vents and the PA speaker By this point things are moving fairly quickly as there's no real "work" to be done - just measuring a location and sticking something on there. More vents, another PA speaker and the six double lamps. Can't get more straightforward than that can we? Lastly, the dinette ceiling got a PA speaker and it's own brass vent Overall view of the internal gubbinses. That's all fine and well, but its all much of a muchness - too much white and there's nothing that really draws the eye (is that a bad thing?). I had anticipated this and had a sort of plan. I wasn't sure it was going to work or not but I knew I needed to do something to break up all that white area. I opted for adding the structure that would have been attached to these panels had the roof actually been fitted. For example, red oxide strips where the side frame would have been, and wooden strips where the partitions would have been located. Now things got a bit more complicated and I actually had to measure and cut with reasonable accuracy to make this thing work and not look plain sloppy. For the "side-frame" I'm using the very last of my 1/32" ply - the very last! I had to scrabble around to find enough to do the job as I really didn't want to have to place another order of this stuff just to finish off the last few inches of roof. Once I had found all I could, I cut it into 3 mm strips and painted red oxide. That seems to break things up nicely. Kitchen & Corridor end finished off Then Bathroom, corridor and dinette area finished. I then realized that I also needed to add framework for the entrance doors and vestibule area... 20 minutes later it's done Close up shot for no other reason that I took the photo Then the other end and the interior of the roof is FINISHED at long last. Only 4 years behind schedule but its done. Now onto the very very very last area of work (I think) The roof exterior. First job on the exterior was to cap the ends so that you couldn't see in behind the paneling. To be honest I'm not that enthralled by how this turned out and I know it's not 100% accurate, but I really don't see any other way of doing it. I think once it's all painted it won't look as cludgy - I guess I'll find out later (oops spoiler alert - you can see the rest of the roof here) again, this went very quickly as it was just sticking bits into the holes. Starting at the kitchen end... center portion Lastly, the dinette end The only thing left to go onto the roof now are the tread-plates at either end. I didn't fit them at this point because it would have been impossible to paint inside the supports so they will get added once the roof has received a good coat of white paint. All things going well, I may even get to throw some white paint on it tomorrow
    9 points
  42. With just the gentle click of the Spirax valve on 37206 to disturb the Birds, it's all quiet in Seven Mills Sidings.
    9 points
  43. The pedestal of the Nestle ending machine started off as a brass naval gun barrel. This was housed in a rebate chiselled in to length of 1.5mm square styrene and glued in pla e with super glue. The foot was made using washers of styrene. The characteristically shaped backing plate and bottom were cut from styrene. The foot of the pedestal was made up from three layers of styrene and then filed to the correct shape. Keeping the tab on made it easier to keep them square to the column. The machine was painted red, with white lining and lettering, but you will be hard pushed to see it in the depths of the tube station. Was it worth it? Probably, yes. It gave me something to do whilst puppy sitting. Tim
    9 points
  44. Hi Folks... Apologies for the serious lack of modeling on this thread of late. Problem is that there's far too many huge 1/1 scale projects on the go here such as a much needed new deck, chicken coops, grow beds and the disaster which was our laundry house. I did however have a couple of interesting running sessions. Trains leaving Bradford usually need a fresh loco and on arrival at Queensbury can have that engine reversed there using the triangle. In fact it's possible to do this with two trains. Unprototypical but very interesting operation. No post would be complete without a train so here's a V3 tank on a Bradford Exchange - Queensbury - Bradford Exchange special. 67673 arriving at Queensbury with a twin third and 5 comp. brake. reversing onto the Halifax line. Waiting for an O1 hauled freight to clear the road. Backing up to the tunnel mouth. After using the Halfax = Keighley road the tank engine backs up to its train (right way around). Here the train is running wrong road through the loops. And coasting down grade back on the correct down road on the approach into Exchange. Finally coming to a halt in platform 4. Hope that you are all keeping out of trouble... Regards Shaun
    9 points
  45. York again today, mainly featuring multiple units. I know a lot of people prefer photos of locomotives but in my view everything to do with railways is worth recording, partly for my own interest and partly to help those who need information about what railway were like at various times in the past, be it the recent past or some time ago. York 144001 Harrogate to York July 87 J9058.jpg York 150212 Manchester Victoria to Scarborough July 87 J9054.jpg York 156475 Scarborough to Liverpool 28th Aug 90 C15364.jpg York 158903 to Liverpol Lime St 3rd June 92 C16889.jpg York 43156 up 26th June 88 C9534 David
    9 points
  46. I've surprisingly enjoyed soldering up guttering from brass U section, brass straight wire and scrap brass/scrap LED legs and resistor legs (yep i do save everything I think is remotely usefull!). In a slightly mad moment I was planning on attaching the guttering to the roof.... which I no idea how that will have worked with a removable roof. Anyway thought better of that idea and it's now firmly attached to the body. Next up is fitting some wire for grab handrails; a bit of paint tidy up and fit the interior. Happy Modelling all! Will
    8 points
  47. Hi Andy. Thanks mate. I've been itching to post something, apart from needing a break from all the work going on here I would rather be modeling! Everything seems to go wrong in threes. starting with the clutch on my truck, then the wish dosher followed by me falling through the rotten back deck. Luckily my friend across the road is a master mechanic who fixed my truck in exchange for a new coop and some other work. Dish washer was an easy fix but the deck has proved to be a major construction project. Whats worse is the washroom. which has been destroyed by termites and carpenter ants. So far this week I have done seven 12 hour days on it rebuilding from the inside. Mrs. S. needs to use the washer and dryer for her work each day but luckily she is down to 2 days per week because of the COVID. It's a nightmare project!!! I'll post up before and after pics as I'm sure everyone will find it interesting. At least we're sleeping well How's life in Hampshire? Have you visited any of the preserved railways near there, the Swanage line is well worth a visit. Regards Shaun
    8 points
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