Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/10/21 in all areas

  1. Announcing major system malfunction. I am currently away from home and admitted to hospital with major heart failure involving mitral valve and atrial fibrillation. The consequences of this mean that I am not feeling my scintillating best and appear to be set for a long stay in an attempt to provide a fix for feeling the less than special way I feel now. I am receiving excellent treatment from my local NHS once I gained admission by kicking in the front door ( A&E) . I am keeping in touch and will continue to do so as long as I possibly can. Best regards to ANTB friends Ian
    31 points
  2. There you are, was having withdrawal symptoms, I suspect AY has been battling hard to get this back up and running so thank you for all your efforts. Life has been carrying on at a sedate pace on LM and one day later than planned here is a re-badged train passing through Encombe Town station sporting the GWR roundel to both loco and carriages. The original manufacturer applied wording/badges where removed using the time honoured method of T-Cut left on for 10-15 mins to the area in question then carefully washed off with a damp cotton bud. With the loco tender I removed all the weathering and name back to the original colour to the entire main side panel then re-badged and weathered as a whole area so their would be no issues with joining old to new. Same process to the coaches but much smaller area of brown but again embracing a whole area approach so no weathering jointing was visible between old and new. Weathering applied using my method of varnish with a hint of roof dirt in it applied in vertical downward strokes.
    28 points
  3. That was as long a break as I can remember. Never mind, here is a nice wide angle view to get things under way again.
    26 points
  4. Hi everyone, Well, the posts immediately above illustrate the dichotomy that we faced with modelling this rolling stock. It certainly hasnt been an easy one to do, but we do love a good challenge. The simple answer to your question is that the Chaldrons require either true scale modelling, or 00 scale modelling; as to make them applicable to both camps would require two complete sets of tooling, such are the areas that need to be attended to. For obvious financial reasons, this was never going to happen I’m afraid, as the true scale market is too small to be viable, and as much as we are all enthusiasts here at Accurascale HQ, we have to make any project viable for us to survive. So now, to expand on that a little, and explain our approach. The CAD was created true to scale, in all aspects bar the wheel sets, and all the usual detail amendments were made as we would normally. With the CAD correct, the 00 wheel sets were introduced, which highlighted the areas that clashed, and from here everything was gradually altered, not just to keep to the gauge, but also to maintain the correct aspects of the wagons. Where the alterations have taken place to keep the wagons looking correct is largely irrelevant in this instance, what matters is that we have kept as close to the originals as is possible in the circumstances, to create a model that is proportioned correctly and which maintains the inherent look of the wagons. Rest assured, we have not sacrificed 1/1000th of a mm where we have not had to! At the end of the day, it was either take this approach or not make a RTR Chaldron wagon at all. We felt that this era of modelling interest needs support, so we decided to plough on and bring an iconic wagon type to market. Perhaps it wont be for everyone, but if it creates more interest in this era then it is beneficial for all modellers of this persuasion. Cheers! Fran
    26 points
  5. It's good that RMWeb is working again, many thanks to Andy and others. The photos which should have appeared yesterday will appear in about 4 weeks time, don't worry, there were nothing very special. It will be four weeks as I always keep about a months worth of photos ready to upload in daily folders. Today we travel to York with a couple of colour photos and some much older black and white ones. Things have changed a bit since they were taken. All but one of the photos were taken by Dad. York 156490 Leeds to York Aug 90 J11615 York LNER V2 4771 and 08337 28th July 86 C7657 York A1 60121 Silurian down ecs 1953 JVol2073 York B16 61443 down l e April 52 JVol6115 York D49 Leeds to Scarbrough c1952 JVol4211 David
    26 points
  6. After a concentrated few weeks with the chop saw - and litres of PVA - I've now finished the baseboards and legs for the Weymouth lines on Yeovil. Overall, pleased with the results: they're strong, flat-surfaced (thanks to Alan Smith kindly cutting out the top surfaces from good quality birch ply (massive thank you to Alan) - why, oh why, didn't I use that for the rest?) and rigid. They're also very heavy - all really a 2-person lift - but that's not a problem as it's primarily a stay-at-home layout. They do all separate and reassemble easily (given a couple of hearties) - location is with pattern-maker's dowels, bolt together with handwheels and captive nuts, separate legs with top height-adjustment. It's good to see the full extent of the project; I finished the scenic track during the lockdowns and that's just rested on for now. Still the track beds to cut out, stick down and sand, joints to close up with P38, trackplan to stick on and superelevation strips as well - THEN I can stick the track down. Wiring will take me up to Christmas - and probably beyond.
    25 points
  7. Here are the final pannier pics showing the other side of 8709. The driver looks like a bit of a shortar$e - perhaps he's an H0 person. He started out as a flag waving guard with whistle who fell out of the box of a second hand loco I bought years ago. He had to have his arms removed to fit into 8709 but he's all I had around. The only bit missing now from 8709 is the Beyer Peacock builder's plates on the front splashers, as in the pic below of my original Bachmann donor loco. Not sure yet how I'm going to replicate these. Rather like the last shot - don't think I've found quite that angle on the goods yard before. John C.
    20 points
  8. Hi everyone, So, who saw our latest OO wagon announcement coming? Let's go on a journey together! A place that (to date) very few manufacturers have gone to before. We're heading off to the very beginning of the railways, to a time when industry and the modern world as we know it was just beginning. Welcome to the Chaldron wagons in OO/4mm scale, the first stop timescale wise in our "Powering Britain" series of coal wagons! Explore the 150 Year History Of These "Black Waggons" With a career on the rails spanning over 150 years, the Chaldrons seemed the perfect place to begin the timeline for our “Powering Britain” series of coal wagons through the ages. There has been a surge in interest in the birth of the railways, along with intrigue in pre-grouping and the Victorian era with recent locomotive releases, not to mention the interest in industrial heritage and its railways. The recognisable Chaldron design appeared around 1820, but that itself was the continuation of an outline that dated from the mid-17th century onwards. The would operate on the railways for another 150 years, ending their days in industrial use. Click on the following link to read our in-depth blog detailing the career of these wagons, from the birth of the railways, through pre-grouping and in extensive industrial use between the wars which continued all the way up to the late 1970s! https://accurascale.co.uk/blogs/news/chaldrons-the-wagons-that-fuelled-the-industrial-revolution Our OO/4mm Model With so many variants of the ‘Chaldron’ being produced by builders across the North-East, as well as ongoing repairs in service by the collieries and the compromises inherent in 00 Gauge modelling, depicting the definitive Chaldron is a complex task, but ultimately rewarding. We have produced five main variants of the type, based on the S&DR style dating from 1835-45 built at Shildon, the North Eastern Railway (and subsequent Internal User pattern) P1 types of the second half of the 19th century and the improved 4T ‘Black Waggons’ that were so prevalent in and around the Seaham area, of which we have identified three main body profile types. Within these five variants, there are different arrangements of ‘bang plates’, handbrakes and wheel styles, which we have included within the tooling suite. Engineering such an interesting and diverse range of waggons is always a challenge that is relished by our team of project managers and engineers. With the series of detail differences between Chaldrons, the “Accurascale Way” of covering various detail differences was employed to offer a comprehensive tooling suite. The couplings also offered an interesting challenge, as we deemed traditional tension lock couplings to be too large for the delicate nature of our Chaldrons, and so we have created an almost prototypical arrangement, with the chains being replicated faithfully and using magnets to join the waggons together, with additional NEM attachments being used for connection to existing locomotives and rolling stock. Check out our blog by clicking the link to see the full specification of these characterful hoppers! https://accurascale.co.uk/blogs/news/chaldrons-the-wagons-that-fuelled-the-industrial-revolution Prices, Availability And Delivery Tooling of these distinctive waggons is now complete with pre-production samples signed off and decorated samples due shortly. Each pack will consist of three wagons and will be priced at £44.99 per pack, with 10% discount applied on two or more packs when you order direct from our website. They are also available from our network of local stockists and are due in stock in Q2 2022. You can pre-order yours direct by clicking here: https://accurascale.co.uk/collections/chaldron Cheers! Fran
    19 points
  9. Hi Tony Having been out of the UK for the past month i am just catching up with the RMWeb discussions. I see the Hornby Thompsons have been discussed again so I hope you don't mind me posting a photo of my own Hornby A2/2 60501. I replaced all the linings to both locomotive and tender using Fox transfers and had to add some additional weathering to cover up the Hornby green livery. i have also changed the tender totem and double chimney to bring it up to the 1958 period but still need at some point to replace the existing smokebox door so the front number plate is in the correct position. Regards David
    18 points
  10. Wartime Skarloey: 'During World War II the old mines had been commandeered for ammunition dumps, and the line was worked to the limit providing slate for blitzed houses and pit props for mines.' - Reverend Wilbert Awdry
    18 points
  11. Don't. It's never pretty.
    17 points
  12. I saw this rather nice pair of Class 378 units at Richmond today: and, it looks like passengers are being made aware of some new rolling stock heading their way (this poster is on the stairway to the down platform)
    15 points
  13. If you're all looking for modelling inspiration on the subject, this is one of the best films I have watched on Seaham's railway operations - so much to ponder on...
    15 points
  14. Thanks, I don’t really want to charge at all but there again there is a lot of expense with the rent of the venue, exhibition insurance and a million other things. Heres a pic of two thirds of the fiddle yard like you’ve never seen before!
    14 points
  15. Not done too much model-wise recently, but I did get a delivery of number plates from Narrow Planet for my 517, so they have been fixed in place (with a dab of gloss varnish). I also knocked up some brake gear for it - the pull rods were fretted/filed from a couple of pieces of 0.010" etch waste sweated together, the brake hangers and shoes were similarly fretted/filed from some 0.020" phosphor bronze. The whole lot (once separated) were cobbled together to look a bit like brake gear, being built up around a couple of pads of thin double-sided PCB and 0.3mm wire. Once "sturdy" (a relative term as the whole ensemble is rather fragile), the cross shafts had pieces removed from their middles replaced with thin wire sleeving so that the two halves were electrically insulated. A quick prime and brush paint with Precision Paints Indian Red and the assembly was ready to install onto the bottom of the chassis. The finished brake assembly prior to painting. A crew of N Brass drivers were painted up (I chose just drivers because the fireman option is a "traditional" chap shovelling). Arms were bent a little (as one of them has his hand so far in the air and looks like he wants to ask if he can go to the toilet!), so that one has his hand resting on the cab opening and the other is reaching up to tap a gauge or something. Also a rather rudimentary backhead was cobbled up from a bit of black plasticard , a few bits of wire and a couple of slivers off the end of a bit of brass rod to represent a couple of gauges. Once painted, stuck in place with a couple of blokes standing in front of it there really is little to see. Completed loco with brake gear, numberplate, and cab populated. View of the rear of the engine showing what can be seen of the cab "detail" Over the last couple of days, with Modbury's first outing for nearly 2 years coming up, I have given some thought to increasing the population of Modbury. The first of these additions is a Shire Scenes Farm Cart (although I made and painted this a few months ago). To give it a purpose, I made some sacks out of milliput, forming one so that it sort of hung over the back. N Gauge horses are very unsatisfactory looking lumps of white metal generally, so inspired by some re-carving that Tim Watson illustrated in the Copenhagen Fields thread, I had a go myself. A small chisel was ground from a gramophone needle, and employed to re-shape a 4 legged lump of white metal into something that bore a little more resemblance to something equestrian, a longer tail being added in low melt solder and then re-carved. The driver of the cart I had already decided to feature standing alongside the horse rather than sitting in the cart, so I took an Andrew Stadden character and performed a little re-modelling on him too - an arm was removed, bent at the elbow and re-attached. His top hat was taken off, and a cloth cap substituted. His jacket was lengthened into a longer coat, which was then carved to be open with a waistcoat underneath. Once man and horse were painted, the horse was glued between the cart shafts, and thin strips of Rizla cigarette paper cut, painted and formed for the reins. The idea being that my little man would be holding one of the reins. Further short bits of pre-painted Rizla strip were added to link cart shafts to the horse harness. Thanks for looking, by the way the little chap is only just over 1cm tall so please forgive the (extremely) cruel close-ups! Ian
    14 points
  16. The p-way team seem unfazed by the appearance of Scottish interloper 37 033 heading south on the ‘Thames-Clyde tractor’ railtour.
    14 points
  17. Well done to Andy Y getting us back up and running before the weekend stuck. I m currently preparing to go through the check list of things to take for tomorrow's exhibition. The list appears massive, but in all honesty most of it will fit into a small toolbox: The exception being the 'rail grinder' aka the sanding machine; a large lamp, the RSU and my work board. Then of course, there is all the materiel.... Fortunately I have a four wheel trundle truck: So it's a case of everything getting dragged into the exhibition hall in one go: Useful if it's raining! Trouble is, it will be 3/4 full of cake....
    14 points
  18. 37 506 rests between duties in the sidings at Charwelton - 01/10/87
    14 points
  19. Shouldn't we be telling people not to panic buy @Accurascale Fran?
    14 points
  20. I think the walls are just about finished, Added some vegetation to the walls.
    14 points
  21. An ex works A2/3 on which to feast your eyes tonight. The Up Glasgow is one of New England's more prestigious passenger turns, so 514 is the natural choice.
    13 points
  22. Saturday's breakfast is at 0500.(Army) 0800(Navy) 1145 (RAF).
    13 points
  23. As mentioned above for those that haven't see Video 21 yet, (shame on you), I now have a Class 150.
    13 points
  24. In 1922 H.C. Casserley visited the CVMR and took several shots of the ancient Beyer Peacock tank that they were using on the passenger service. It's been a long time since I posted anything about the CVMR, but I have recently revived it with DCC control. https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/136413-the-calder-vale-mineral-railway/&do=findComment&comment=4588145
    13 points
  25. 37 506 rests between duties in the sidings at Charwelton - 01/10/87
    13 points
  26. Now then Fran; I had no conceivable need for these whatsoever (they should be steel bodied) for a project. Until I thought Earl of Durham could be Earl of Dudley and the Pontop and Jarrow markings could lose the J for the Pensnett Railway. Bugger.
    13 points
  27. Hi Dave, Many thanks for your order! We are actually finessing the coupling system as will be apparent on the decorated samples, but this might give you an idea of their operation @Islesy will explain them better than I can and we will be doing a visual demonstration with them once the decorated samples arrive. We 100% agree on the tension locks argument, and if there was one thing I could change in the hobby myself it would be banishing them forever. They're only fit for the bin. It's also not our first rodeo in pushing alternative solutions, as our Mark 5s show. Opposite ends of the railway era, but similar ideas! Cheers, Fran
    12 points
  28. I would have thought a cake transport would have been far more secure than that!
    12 points
  29. The p-way team seem unfazed by the Scottish interloper as 37 033 appears heading south on the ‘Thames-Clyde tractor’ railtour.
    12 points
  30. What a brilliant think to have done. Well done. I am sure the release will be a well-deserved success; count me in. I'm going to set my P&J micro layout before 1911 (so I don't have to set fire to the models right after I've bought them!).
    12 points
  31. The old Beyer Peacock 2-4-0T has been in the 'shops for the fitting of vacuum brakes. I also added some details, including a jack and a toolbox. It has been fitted with sound, using the gear that I had put in a DJH Austerity. That thing is well down the list for works attention and needs a new chassis, so I thought the DCC gear would be better used here. The Austerity sound project isn't that good anyway, so I'll get something better and more suited to this old Beyer loaded onto the decoder in due course. The Hornby coaches have had a light weathering to take the newness and plasticyness off them. This Hornby B2 Peckett belongs to @rsh7684 but has been back to me to have a Stay Alive and larger speaker fitted. It will need several running in turns on the quarry trains of the CVMR, just to be sure that it's all tip top before it goes back. The CVMR fitters are sticklers for everything being right, so this could take weeks.
    12 points
  32. Morning all, Firstly, I would like to reiterate HH’s congrats to Andy. Secondly, some very nice bread pudding was had on Wednesday. Enough said. Douglas
    12 points
  33. Ah, this is what the trundle truck goes in... Dave
    11 points
  34. A look at some of the buildings on the layout: South Pelaw signal box and a selection of the many working semaphores on the layout, with 9F 92062 waiting for the signal to allow it to pass on it's way to bank an iron ore train to Consett. The interior of the box is fully detailed with, as per the prototype, the lever frame at the rear of the box so, when operating the signal man had his back to the tracks. The signal box lasted until 1983 when it was demolished and the lever frame craned out. If you know where to look, there are a few bricks left and the concrete base of a small extension at the rear of the box remain. Either side of the Pelton Lane bridge, were two rows of railway cottages. The cottages were demolished in late 1966/early 1967 and no trace of them remains today. At one of the shows we've attended, we spoke to a postman who used to delivery to the houses. Stella Gill Flatts signal box. A rather tall structure to give the signal man a view in to Stella Gill yard beyond the bridge to the left. The box was demolished in 1970 after the yard was lifted. The bridge remains in use today (as can be seen, it carries a main gas pipe along one side) albeit it is now at ground level as the valley that the tracks run through was completely filled in the late 70s. The main line to Consett can be seen behind the box - in reality there was a much larger gap between the box and main line but, at this end of the layout the tracks curve round to get to the fiddle yard. All photos from Tony Lambert. John
    11 points
  35. Dave @Rustonasked about the magnetic couplings and, as is often the way, the first prototypes weren’t quite ready when the EPs shipped. @Accurascale Franhas added the pictures we received from the factory and there’s not much else I can really explain without having them to hand to demonstrate! In a nutshell, there’s a length of fine length chain attached to each coupling pin, and at the head is a housing containing a (very) small magnet. Of course, this works with the wagons, but how then to attach to a locomotive, or additional item of rolling stock? Well, each pack will come with at least two NEM fit magnetic couplings, something akin to the attached picture.
    11 points
  36. The crew of Peckett B2 Olwyn prepare to stop to pin down the brakes on their train of architectural stone, from Woodhead's quarry, on the Calder Vale Mineral Railway. Every bit of braking power will be needed to descend the 1 in 18 bank to Brookfoot.
    11 points
  37. While I am sat here waiting for things to load... the past couple of evenings I have got on with the final build for the moment, an E158 Composite again using Comet and Mainline parts. This time given the shorter length of the composite I have used the Comet ends as well as the sides (again soldering a length of brass along the top for added stiffness and to reinforce the joint between side and roof. The Mainline roof has been cut down to length (foolishly I did this from memory and forgot to allow for the thickness of the saw, meaning I had to add back a little more length in plasticard!) Thankfully the roof itself needed a lot less work than the First and Brake Third, in that it was just roof vents which needed moving. Annoyingly one of them seems to have pinged off into the carpet so the model is currently one vent short of a full complement... I followed the usual Comet construction, soldering one end to each side and then joining together before gluing the roof in place. Moving onto the underframe, form experience with the First I knew that the headstocks need to be cut along the edge of the "step" up at the end of the underframe moulding. The Comet brass headstock could then be glued in position along with a set of their buffers (the plastic headstocks were not wasted, they ended up fitted to the K40). The underframe needed modification to get both battery boxes at one end (as per the brake third) along with moving the solebar steps to match the new corridor side doors. Finally it has been fitted with a pair of wire/loop couplings through the headstock. The coach is now ready for paint (along with the D127 brake third and the K40. All of which should get primed in the morning (if its dry) and painted over the weekend. Although looking at the forecast I am thinking there is not much chance of that...
    11 points
  38. IRM/Accurascale's first loco. What "A Class" delivery! An exciting time for us all Cheers! Fran
    11 points
  39. I've been quite busy for the last few weeks, doing a few jobs to assist Re6/6 with the exhibiting of 'Parkend Marsh Sidings' at the 'Mini-Scaleforum' day near Teignmouth last weekend. This included building two cottages (one still unfinished) and sorting out a few more wagons, particularly 16t minerals. Prior to that, I had started building another (very) low relief factory for Callow Lane, to fill a gap between the two overbridges. It's based on a new Scalescenes kit for a rail-served factory (although it won't be rail-served on Callow Lane): I shall only be using one of the outside walls, although that will have full relief and associated detail. I had only made a start cutting the basic shape out from Dalerboard, before suspending work to do the jobs for 'Parkend Marsh Sidings': Here are some of the 16t minerals posed in front of it: Now that the show has taken place, I've re-started work on the low-relief factory and have started to glue the Scalescenes brick paper on the front. Because this is a modification of their original design, this has involved a bit of 'cut & shut' with the brickpaper: It will all be weathered to a more grimy finish in due course.
    11 points
  40. Not much modelling done since my last post . I got a bit distracted last week. Apart from an election that nobody wanted, our eldest daughter finally remarried after three previous attempts had been thwarted by Covid. She and her partner chose to be married on the beach in West Vancouver. Bearing in mind Vancouver's Fall weather pattern this was, as Sir Humphrey might say, a bold (or despairate?) decision. The week before the wedding it rained, non stop. Similar story this week. Fortunately, for the week of the wedding, the weather was glorious. Spectacular setting, a simple but moving ceremony followed by a great party. Alls well that ends well........hardly surprising I missed my weekly posting deadline. Here is the extent of last weeks modelling Not sure why I waited 10 years to do this. Mind you, I still have to create an extension that will link warehouse and platform......that could take a while. One other reason for my slow progress is my resolve to only model in the morning and devote the afternoons to developing automated routines for the timetable Here is part of a routine I am currently working on: A Down Parcels train to Birkenhead leaving the Storage Yard A work stained Hardwick Grange hauling seven assorted NPCS vans towards Granby Viaduct The routine calls for two loaded vans to be exchanged with two empties from the King St Parcels Depot at Granby: The vans in the dispatch siding have to be shunted across the main lines prior to the arrival of the Parcels train The Station Pilot (9407 on loan from Oxley) couples with the Vans Draws them back into Bay 1 and then propels the Vans out of the bay area to the Up Main There is a slight continuity problem here......the sharp eyed will see that the Siphon G that was drawn into Bay 1 emerged miraculously without corridor connections as a Siphon H with a tail lamp........I did mention I was testing the routines........the Siphon G failed being consistently propelled over the throat double slips! Having cleared the throat points the Pilot reverses and pulls the vans across the Down Main and into Platform 6: Where it will await the arrival of the Parcels Train..............to be continued
    11 points
  41. Glad to see RMW up and running again. I'm having a couple of days of bachelorhood at home while Jill is remaining at our friends' pad for house and animal sitting. Unfortunately my dreams of several days in the workshop have been thwarted by having to go yesterday to see the friend whose husband is in a home with dementia to discuss the future of his photograph collection with an interested party then today has so far been largely taken up by niffnaff and trivia as well as instructions to get supplies in and preparaations done for the dreaded D word that is scheduled to take place soon. This afternoon I have to go to see Dad and make sure he is provisioned and get him a meal ready then I have to return to Jill either tomorrow afternoon or Sunday - final instructions have yet to be received. I may yet get an hour or so in this evening and possibly tomorrow morning though so all is not lost. Good luck to HH with the show. I had intended to be there but it looks as though that will not happen now. Dave
    11 points
  42. Also fitted the Sig-na Trak this morning, and cleared all the 7mm stuff from it, I just need to program in all the 4mm Stock, and then allocate Sound codes and then name all the functions, so will probably do that in the morning. Need to put my feet up for the afternoon now as we have a Band Rehearsal tonight, so need to store up some energy. Then an embankment will run along over this lot of wires. Also put the holders in for the two hand sets.
    11 points
  43. NORTH EASTERN KITS LNER F8 The Westinghouse pump casting has been slightly modified to suit the F8 and a start has been made on the various pipes to and from this pump. Chas, now you can see what that hole under the globe lubricator was for. Many more pipes still to fit to various parts of the loco, above and below the footplate!! I've also restarted work on the London Road Models N8 using more of Arthur's castings - tank fillers, Ross pop valves, buffers, etc. - and some of the spare etches - smokebox lamp iron, coal door, tank front handrail brackets, etc. - from the various tank locos built over the last eight years. Often, Arthur provides spare/duplicated etched components on the frets, which are assiduously saved for later use. Cheers Mike
    11 points
  44. Sorry for the lack of posts over the last few months. I was concerned that people were getting jaded to the constant streams of photos of panniers. Anyway, I thought I’d post to say that if you do enjoy Tetbury, it was filmed back in February as a feature layout for the Hornby: A model world programme. If I do find out which episode it’s in, I’ll post an update. I’ve now got a good selection of new photos, so will start putting the best ones up over the next few weeks.
    11 points
  45. A bad back has reduced me to tottering about with the odd tourettes like outburst when a move sets off a spasm. Progress on the layout has been almost non existent however I have found some grainy but wonderfully atmospheric footage of York steam in the sixties. It's funny but I often find the poor quality stuff far more evocative than the pin sharp, perfectly lit, footage.
    11 points
  46. Barclay 16” 0-4-0st “Lady Evelyn propels empty hoppers over the weighbridge prior to shunting them for loading, as Barclay 14” 0-4-0st demonstrates a new line of business for the Shelby Group subsidiary White Peak Limestone and Tarmacadam Ltd in the shape of specially selected large pieces of limestone for use in architecture and sculpture.
    11 points
  47. Or a RTP building. I don't have a very good record keeping them as their maker intended. Anyway, as you've been very good lately, here's some Pannier thingies for you...
    10 points
  48. As well as the loco liveries shown a while ago, my experiments with inkjet printer transfers also involve wagon liveries. These two were made from @Skinnylinny's excellent CAD, I've only done the transfer design - one on clear backed transfer paper, one on white backed. A little bit of touch-up work required in places, but I think they look alright! A couple more loco liveries were printed at the same time, but I haven't got round to applying those yet. Watch this space...
    10 points
  49. I think there's no doubt that the likes and dislikes with regard to railway carriages is a very personal things. 'Crushed under a boot of Mk.1 tyranny'. I'm sure those who were travelling in the few Mk.1 carriages in the northbound train involved in the Harrow disaster of nearly 70 years ago were glad that's what they were in. The 'far more interesting' wooden bodied or wooden-framed pre-Nationalisation carriages were reduced to matchwood and foil. Witness the remains of the 12-wheeled Restaurant Car next to the bookshop in one of the appalling scenes. Of course, this doesn't relate to our models; I have many metal Gresleys and a large number of plastic Mk.1s. I'm also in agreement that older carriages have a greater appeal to the model-maker than the more-uniform Mk.1. However, despite the fact that there were still many wooden-bodied carriages running on the ECML in 1958, most of the named trains (with the exception of 'The Elizabethan' and the Pullmans) were made up principally of Mk.1s. Thus, if a summer weekday's service is to be replicated, then Mk.1s (and loads of them) there must be. To 'deny' that fact is altering history. In fact, I've even found pictures of Mk.1s running on the M&GN! All the above said, over half my fleet of carriages are not Mk.1s, but kit-built Gresleys and Thompsons, as well as some pre-Grouping vehicles. Anyway, I do find it a fascinating scene when a principal train bowls by with its mainly Mk.1s fore and aft, with pre-Nationalisation cars in the form of singles, twins or triplets providing the catering. As for their being too long; unless you have the space, then don't use them (or any other long vehicles, whatever their origins). Anyway, I'm rather fond of Mk.1s, and I think they have an 'elegance' in their own right. If they offend too much, then they can be legitimately substituted (a common occurrence), as here................. In 'The Northumbrian', where a Thompson BSK has replaced the usual Mk.1. Also note the ex-1938 'Flying Scotsman' triplet providing the catering. Apart from the Thomson SK (with ladies' retiring room) and the BG, this 'Flying Scotsman' set is all Mk.1. That said, I still think it makes a fine train. As does this all-Mk.1 morning 'Talisman' (in my opinion). Of course, the afternoon 'Talisman' is more-varied. The Mk.1s complement the Gresley and Thompson stock very well. As for Bachmann Mk.1s being poor models; with the roof ribs removed (x90+!) and a touch of weathering, they meet my needs very well indeed.
    10 points
  • Newsletter

    Want to keep up to date with all our latest news and information?
    Sign Up
×
×
  • Create New...