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  1. Ok, a very harsh closeup. Not perfect, but better than I could do by hand.
    8 points
  2. Hi Bennybob, I put considerable effort into developing a method which would allow me to work on the coach sides on the flat then simply fit them in place. Then take them on and off again as many times as I want without any difficulty. Clean the insides, move the passengers about, that sort of thing. The simple answer is magnets, have a read of the blog two back ; If you have look through the blog as a whole you will see that it is a continuing theme for me. Causes a wry smile and I do tend to waffle on a bit but there is method in my madness. I try to make models which are easily maintained, probably as a result of spending lifetime trying to sort out things which are a nightmare to maintain due to bad design. So I have buildings and stock with the roofs held on by magnets. Electrical sub assemblies which slot into place. Signals which plug in and couple to the servos magnetically. Compensation beams with screw adjustment for ride height. Baseboards that lift up like a car bonnet so I can get at the gubbins underneath easily. The whole layout on castors. All for ease of maintenance. If I needed to decorate or do serious work to the room I could remove all the delicate stuff and wheel the whole layout into a different room in a few hours. As I said I waffle on a bit, but there some useful ideas in there.
    5 points
  3. Thanks Stephen, that would explain why they don't seem to have grown much in volume. Of course at the King's Meadow end in 1905 things were rather different, as this heavily cropped image shows. But that was also more of a park, if I understand correctly.
    5 points
  4. 'Europa' by PJT Reed. Image courtesy of the Great Western Trust.
    5 points
  5. A bit of treemanship over the past few days. First a skeleton.................................. and then it all `leafed` alone....
    4 points
  6. Excellent, please pass on my thanks to your wife, Mike, very kind of her! The leaves also look like Plane as far as I can see. It seems I’m in luck then. As discussed in the workbench thread, the Victorian fondness for London Plane was the reason that I tried to make the bark look grey and a bit mottled. But I wasn’t sure what species those at Reading were. The two right-hand tree in your wife’s first photo even have a shape fairly similar to my model trees. It’s interesting that some are not pollarded, while others are. Perhaps the pollarded ones are those close to the buildings.
    4 points
  7. My wife kindly took a couple of photos as I drove along Vastern Road, Reading, on Sunday afternoon. The 'blotched' bark, clearly visible on the nearer trunks, shows that they are the hybrid known as 'London Plane'. This tree is a hybrid of American sycamore and Oriental plane, it was first discovered in the 17th century then widely planted in the 18th. It's special characteristic is that the bark has large scaly plates that peel off to reveal new creamy bark beneath. This constant renewal of the bark enabled it to thrive in the smoky city streets of 19th century London and in close proximity to railway yards in steam days. Mike
    4 points
  8. I tried another shot tonight. This time as an experiment I took the UV filter off the front of the lens: I'm not sure why it but it was definitely having an adverse effect on the images. With the ones above in the main post, I had to load them into Gimp to brighten them up, but this one is untouched, except for a bit of cropping which I did in Paint.
    4 points
  9. Many thanks Mark. A long way to go before they reach your level of refinement. At first there is the excitement of being able to make something tree-like, then comes the realisation that on closer inspection it's more complicated than you thought. I suppose that's called learning! The toothbrush trick sounds fun, must try that. The walls need decorating anyway I bike past these Plane trees (sic) daily on my way to work, and was amused to realize that they have similar shapes to mine. I'd like to say that's deliberate, but it's not. The crowns are more compact than most Plane trees I have seen. Good idea! I do have a plan for a trainspotting youngster sitting on a branch. It will require some figure bashing though. Very arty. You could chop it up in small bits and sell each bit as a birds nest on Ebay: ****LOOK***** OO/HO TRUE SCALE MODEL BIRDS NESTS **** AWESOME LIKE REAL****IMPRESS YOUR FRIENDS****ONLY GBP 15.00****
    4 points
  10. Here’s one taken by me at Warley in 2003, using a crappy 2Mp camera: And here’s one taken in Feb 2020 by one Andy York of this parish: Hope that helps.
    4 points
  11. My secret is out!!! yes, I'm a chocoholic! Unfortunately, the taste of PLA is not great, so I shall stick to my usual brands At present, the parts are straight from the printer, Mikkel. They do slide together pretty closely on their brass tube but I shall probably do some surface fettling before I take it all to the painting stage. If I were to use this method for a later GWR tank engine, I'd be able to swap over from saddle tanks to panniers just by lifting off the relevant components. I've already got a couple of spare tanks, after re-prints to improve the appearance of the rivets. At present, I'm working on the frames and it's useful to be able to 'test assemble' the parts within the computer, before finalising the design for printing. Mike
    3 points
  12. I have found all this very useful, having found the need to fit some type of auto-couplings on my 4mm/P4 shunting plank, my eyesight no longer being up to the job of using 3-links. As there was the requirement to retro-fit magnets into the track as electro-magnets were not an option, after some experimentation I have gone for the combination of 6mm x 6mm rod ones - they will just fit between the sleepers - and the 2mm mk3 S&W's. I had these for my 2mm scale modelling before deciding DG's were better in this scale so thought I'd try using them in 4mm given the size issues with even the 3mm/4mm ones. With some alteration they enable quite close coupling and look slightly less obvious. Having spent a modelling lifetime getting free running rolling stock the biggest challenge perhaps has been to make them the opposite so the S&W's work properly all the time, no random un-coupling when not wanted! What fun......but worth it in the end.
    3 points
  13. I use the 3mm Mk3's as seen above on the right - they are less obtrusive than the 4mm version and have a delayed uncoupling action, so are far more versatile. My curves are 24" with one or two yard ones a bit less and I have no problems with them, with the proviso that my stock are all handed so there is a coupling at one end only.
    3 points
  14. John, my own knowledge is limited to the Mk3 couplings (I use the 3mm ones), so I have no practical experience of the difference between Ml1 and Mk3. These photos of Mk1 (left) and Mk3 (right) suggest the only difference is the shape of the hook. As for radius, my layouts are small without much curvature, so it hasn't been an issue for me. Can others help?
    3 points
  15. I simply could not resist those sweeping curves! One step at a time - I've not even thought about wheels yet
    3 points
  16. An excellent solution to the lining problem. I’ll try it on my pre 1900 GWR coaches if I can get cream transfer paper! Duncan
    3 points
  17. That is correct. Otherwise by now the canopy would be overshadowing the buildings.
    3 points
  18. I recently had a 3D-printing disaster. The model slipped on the printer bed in my absence and when I returned I found this. A new way of building rampant undergrowth, birdsnest etc.
    3 points
  19. i drive along that stretch of Vastern Road quite frequently so must pay more attention to the trees! I'm usually concentrating on avoiding the bus lanes, having been caught on camera on the short stretch under the railway bridge - a good revenue earner I suspect.
    3 points
  20. I almost missed this. Tree planting is my wife's expertise but North Leigh could do with an upgrade, so I shall show her your methods - they look very good That first photo of Vastern Road looks almost like a model - the trees have a surprising regularity of shape. For some reason, your first sunlit shot seems more like the Mediterranean than Southern England - something about the clarity of the light. Some unusual wooden picture-frames in the background. Mike
    3 points
  21. In neither of those two Vastern Road shots can you see our first house in Reading - it's between the two. But unlike the goods yard, the trees, or some of them, are still there: https://www.google.com/maps/@51.4615045,-0.9732008,3a,75y,90h,90t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sQ1qtSldbLGTwm59FiFxX1Q!2e0!7i16384!8i8192 Here's the house - the end of the terrace - externally it hasn't changed much since we moved out 20 years ago, though we did make an attempt to keep the hedge within bounds: https://www.google.com/maps/@51.4616282,-0.972462,3a,75y,90h,90t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1slSA68JT3W3pYMns7oj153Q!2e0!7i16384!8i8192
    3 points
  22. @Mikkel, there are 1887 spec drawings in A.J. Watts, Private Owner Wagons from the Ince Waggon & Ironworks Co. - still available at just £7 from the HMRS, I believe (although no doubt more in the EU, for which I can only apologise on behalf of my mis-led and lied-to countrymen). These are for 8 ton 5-plank wagons with and without end doors, and for 8 ton hopper-bottomed wagons. The inside ironwork is very like that on Midland 8 ton 5-plank wagons - hardly surprising since the chairman of the RCH Wagon Superintendents' Committee at the time was T.G. Clayton, the Midland's Carriage & Wagon Superintendent. So, in addition to the side knees, there is a horizontal corner plate at the top of the corners and four vertical plates inside the corner, as washer plates for the bolts visible on the external corner plates. The principal difference is that the RCH drawings show diagonal ironwork on the outside; there is no ironwork mirroring these on the inside, so I presume coach bolts were to be used there.
    3 points
  23. Thanks Graham, yes it's about time there was more greenery on Farthing. The challenge has always been that with small layouts like mine there isn't really room to show much of what goes on behind the railway boundary, so the green stuff has been very limited. This is an attempt to move a bit beyond that in a small-layout setting. Thanks Dave. It's been a bit of an eye opener for me to realize what strategically placed trees can do for a layout. Also when seen from above, where they break up what can otherwise seem a bit 2D. I came across this during my searches. A layout opportunity with a difference, for the patient tree modeller! I believe Withington was GWR, ex-MSWJR? The H&G Thynne Tile Works, Withington, 1949. Source: Britain from Above. Withington 1949. Source: Britain from above.
    3 points
  24. Go for it, Mikkel - I've tried to lift as many secrets of 3D printing as I can in my various posts
    2 points
  25. Yum, chocolate boiler. A very nice piece of design work with the way it all fits together.
    2 points
  26. Many thanks John, that's useful information. I have to say that I'm quite happy with my S&Ws, and find them quite reliable. Also easy to tweak, should one go out of alignment. Just remember to always look over your shoulder...
    2 points
  27. My ruling radius on the mainline is 30 inches (although it gets squeezed a bit tighter here and there). I've got one siding which is tighter than that, so probably somewhere between 24 and 28 inches and stock has to be pushed and pulled through it during shunting. Certainly no problems with typical 4 wheel stock, up to say CCTs, and small tank and tender locos, but I've not tried pushing really long wheelbase stock through it very systematically. I've occasionally had to fiddle with the couplings on the mainline where there's a loco with a large rear-end throw (such as a large prairie or Fowler 4MT) pulling some wagon or coach which also has a long throw. The solution in that case is just to make the goalpost bit as wide as possible to allow maximum deflection of the hook. In general I would say there is a good chance of getting S&Ws to work on somewhat tighter curves than the quoted 30 inches. provided you're prepared to experiment and perhaps accept that some stock can't be marshalled next to other items.
    2 points
  28. I won't comment on the shade of pink(!) but I would suggest using capital letters, rather than lower case. Lower case was seldom used for sign-writing until the sixties, and as you as adopting steam traction, I can only assume that your period is around or before that date. The reason is wasn't popular was due to the descenders on letters like the p and y in your title, upsetting the balance of the lettering. You could make the initial letters of each word larger, rather as the LBSCR did to good effect: and possibly centrally on the tank side, both vertically and horizontally.
    2 points
  29. Cheers Mikkel, Might be worth trying the Crafty paper, the stuff I had was about 6 years old if I remember correctly. Getting in to fit passengers is easy with the magnetic sides. I have a few of Andy Staddens seated Edwardians, but I think I will buy some more or try a few other suppliers and paint them over the winter.
    2 points
  30. Aha! That's an interesting technique, Dave, looks very good to me. You can't see that it's double-layered either, which is a little surprising. I also have some old Crafty paper, but it looks like I shouldn't be counting on that. It's a shame they closed, they had some interesting products. Thanks for the tip about Mister decal paper. In the midst of all the excitement about the panels, I think your interior deserve a mention too (the coach interior, not yours!). Looks excellent. Will there be passengers? Always a dilemma, I think.
    2 points
  31. ...there certainly are and I've adopted quite a few of them and there are quite a few more I wish I'd seen before completing something - the car bonnet baseboards in particular! Kit PW
    2 points
  32. Looks pretty good to me. I don't think I could achieve that standard even by following your technique, but it does seem to be a practical approach to a very difficult problem and has enabled you to produce excellent results without having to get the hang of those lining pens which I gave up on long ago. Congratulations. The carriage seating is pretty impressive too.
    2 points
  33. Most of the rule books and safety books show the horse to the side of the track, with a chain attached to the horse shunting loop on the side of the wagon. Often the rules have a direct prohibition on the use of the main coupling for horse shunting. That said, as JimC suggests, there are many photos showing the horse in the 4 foot with the chain attached to the main coupling. Not wise, if there is a bit of a slope to the track it is lasagne for tea..... Now , If I was a Board of trade inspector, with a suitable military title and a large moustache I would create a set of rules for horse working that bridge. The horse must be out of the four foot and attached to the wagon with a chain long enough for the horse on one side and the wagon on the other side to be clear of the restriction when the move is started. So , 4 yards horse, 10 yards bridge, 5 yards wagon hook. Say 20 yards. The horse can then pull the wagon with a slightly dragging brake through the bridge without danger of men or horse being caught in the narrow bit. The same idea could apply for captan working. This is a working set, one day I will find a use for them . Something like this:
    2 points
  34. Although Bournemouth had loads of Bullied light pacifics there was just a small set of those used regularly on the S&D in the 60's, maybe because they had the tablet catchers fitted ? (or at least the drilled holes for them ?}, and they were all West Countries not B of Bs. There's plenty of photos of 34028,39,40,41,42,43,45,46 and 103. Much less of 34029,44,47 and 102. The impression I've formed from a very comprehensive photo analysis I've done is that the most common Bullied on the S&D was 34043 Combe Martin until its demise in late 1962 (and just after the Pines was diverted away from the S&D), though there's no records or science behind this. It's been quoted as being a strong engine but a poor steamer (I'm not sure if that's a contradiction). Maybe all that hard work on the S&D was behind the demise. It was one of the first 2 Bullieds withdrawn I think, but my favorite.
    2 points
  35. Coming very late to this - any chance of some pictures of the layout?
    2 points
  36. Looks like the creature from the Black Lagoon, to me. Back, if I may be excused, to those Vastern Road trees. I'm afraid I cannot yet confirm the species but one point of note is that they are now pollarded, and have been for at least the last quarter-century. I can't quite decide whether they were already pollarded in those 1940s Britain from Above photos.
    2 points
  37. Thanks Mike, still lots to learn. I have been admiring your modelling and photography in the October BRM. I knew what was coming, but even so I was once again amazed by the extraordinary views that you have created. Whatever next?!!
    2 points
  38. Beautiful trees. Superb attention to detail as per usual.
    2 points
  39. I presume that you've seen these? Dave
    2 points
  40. Alan, it's always a treat to read a post from you. Master of small spaces and the 'fish tank' layout, it looks superb so far. I wish I could crack on with scenery like you do.
    2 points
  41. Mikkel, You will of course be adding a few bird nests won't you !
    2 points
  42. The trees are superb. For the camouflage look for the bark, try experimenting by flicking on paint from an old toothbrush. With a bit of practice you should end up with the required colours in flecks of paint as opposed to trying to apply by brush. I will confess that I haven't had the opportunity to try this method myself but I have seem some exceptional results from a book on model tree making.
    2 points
  43. I'll have to consult with an expert... That Vastern Road c. 1905 photo is very familiar - you may recall it was the reference for my GW opens with sheeted timber loads. I think these are the same trees but over the years they've been thinned out as the grew - something like every other tree removed in your 1940s photos and every other tree again by now (by late 1990s, in fact). The second photo shows the South Eastern station. The prison is bottom left.
    2 points
  44. It`s been great getting away from loco kit building and the layout is now progressing. I`ve had a period of grassing up with the Flockit using predominantly German static grasses of varying lengths which seem superior to the £20 wasted on some GB stuff which failed to take a static charge!! At long last the layout now has a fiddleyard thanks to some of Intentio`s cassette kits...
    2 points
  45. Fascinating photos of Withington. That must be an orchard, apples ? The tile works is impressive too, the courtyard design round the five kilns.
    2 points
  46. Many thanks Chris. I think the first attempts are particularly evident in the trunk and shapes of the branches, which are a bit too gnarly in places. And in the colouring, which was more tricky than I thought it would be. The sticky mess - would that be the deposits from those on the way home from the pub? Well, I tried to calculate that. A quote from the workbench thread: "in 1880 the town planners of Farthing modernized the area's streets, sewers and lighting in response to the 1875 Public Health Act (thanks to flyingbadger for the info). In so doing they planted London plane, which have a quoted growth rate of 50-100 centimeters a year and a normal full grown height of 20-30 meters. Using the lower growth rate, the trees would have reached 10 meters in 1900, equivalent to 13 cms in 4mm scale, which is the height of the trees I'm currently building..." The shape of the crown is a bit off though. Although I have found photos of London Plane looking like my trees here, they are commonly more elongated/oval. The foliage should arguably also be less dense and lighter.
    2 points
  47. Mike, it’s been a while since I was over on this big and I must say Tantalus is look excellent. My SECR project eventually stalled and I am now working to scratch build a 2 inch gauge 4-4-0, however my Pyracmon class still sits unharmed and awaits a display shelf. Douglas
    2 points
  48. So nice to see a floral tribute to the layout which helps to add a more realistic overall scene. G
    2 points
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