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Showing content with the highest reputation since 21/09/09 in Blog Comments

  1. If you are going to the trouble of making an extra board that can only be used at shows I'd be tempted to go the whole hog and do another full size baseboard with that engine shed scene you talked about. Would an extra board fit in your normal transport? Few of the pictures we didn't use in the MRJ article, Jerry
    13 points
  2. Boiler more or less done and some of the ‘sticky-uppy bits’ added. The gearbox under the boiler is clearly evident at the moment but should be hidden once the drivers and splashers are in place.
    13 points
  3. So, a wee update. Bit of a jump from the last pic but I’ve almost completed the body. There are still a few details to attach and some of the bits are just balanced in place for the photo. All soldering is complete and de-greasing is done, so a bit of filling, glueing and painting to follow. Then I can finish off the chassis, which to be fair I should have done before getting too carried away with the top half, but what the heck. Sometimes you just gotta live life on the edge!
    12 points
  4. Hi. This will probably be my last comment on this subject, as I have suffered enough high blood pressure when I've thought about it. As if by magic, this is what Waterman and his company have done to my £455.00 ; yes you did read correctly, attached is a scan of the cheque I've received of the Receivers of Just Like The Real Thing, for the princely sum of £0.47. So much for the empathy that Waterman says he has for all things railway !! Don't think I need to say any more................ So I won't.
    11 points
  5. This evening’s test was to see if Little England would actually pull six cast white metal 1st class carriages on a level road, and... “Oh ye of little faith”... it did! But, (and there’s always a ‘but’), it would only do it bunker first and the gears make quite a racket! I also need to adjust the spring loading on the front axle as the wheels slide a bit. Perhaps a weighted collar around the axle would help. For the sake of BBC style balance, I also tried my 0-4-2 on the same rake and it strolled quietly away with them like they weren’t there! I love that engine..!
    10 points
  6. That was taken at the west end of Burngullow sidings, at the old slurry loading area. This was abandoned in 1990 when it was replaced with the new slurry plant, which consisted of a covered slurry loading shed and a covered tank wagon washing shed. 'Images of Industrial & Narrow Gauge Railways - Cornwall' is a different book. Maurice produced another book titled Cornwall Narrow Gauge through the middleton press. You might be able to find a copy through amazon or ebay. With regards to how the dries operated, I have attached a photo of a scale drawing of a cross-section t
    10 points
  7. When providing images for a magazine we photographed Alloa with among other things a low angle lens with a min aperture of f43. This was used for close ups but also allowed good depth of field but actually worked too well at times with the very long exposures giving clarity to a bus win an over bridge 30 feet away making the picture look unrealistic! Cameras were Nikon bodies and all lenses Nikon but Canon Fuji or any of the other big names will all do similar lenses. We were fortunate in that we had access to the camera bodies and hired the special lense needed which cost wise
    10 points
  8. Hi Al, I do indeed Not a Buffalo, but a 2021 class saddle tank. I built it with a rigid chassis, which in retrospect was a mistake. All my other locos have sprung compensation and run much more smoothly because of it. The plan is to fit some Slater's sprung hornblocks, but I need to source some split coupling rods from somewhere. Hopefully it'll be ready for Telford!
    10 points
  9. Well, I have an update. The fascia contains the lighting and forms a separate unit, it will sit on top of the layout. I also wanted it to hold the fiddle yard when transported or stored. The fiddle yard sits within a compartment on top of the fascia. It is retained by way of an interference fit and does not require any fastners. Rob.
    10 points
  10. Beautiful work as always, and fascinating too. My stables for Bricklayers Arms are nearing completion so my thoughts are turning to hay so your article is very timely and extremely useful. I will be shamelessly copying a few techniques here especially the use of plumbers hemp. Thank you.
    9 points
  11. Thanks, will keep that in mind. Maybe no music either! It is! You must have missed it. There's even a map, drawn up by that Tolkien fellow.
    9 points
  12. Thanks folks! I have these two shots of the front. It’s nearly done but you can see in the second image the Grange Road Bridge still needs painting, railings, weathering and setting in place.
    9 points
  13. I'm pleased to report that wagon 60172 has been sent back to the Midlands and has returned to Sherton Abbas with a load Irritatingly one of the packing cases hasn't cast properly and has a flaw on it's side which I'll need to rectify! Why do I only notice these things after I've posted the picture
    9 points
  14. Ah yes, I had forgotten about those. Here is one of them:
    9 points
  15. When painting my Edwardian period figures (Andrew Stadden), I initially prime them white, then use enamels to paint them. I always mix up colours (never using anything straight from the tin), and mix up 3 shades of the same colour, a base colour, one a little darker (by adding slightly more of the darkest colour used in the mix) for the shadows, and one a little lighter (by adding a touch of white) for the highlights. I tend to apply paint where it is needed with a very fine brush in the shadows rather than an all over wash, and dry brush the highlights. A few photos o
    8 points
  16. Thanks Miss P. A lot of belpaires there. I prefer a roundtop myself on these. Note the Armstrong smokebox door. Bigger and less dished than the Dean:
    8 points
  17. Aha, two sheets to the wind, eh? Not sure where Donald Trump has disappeared to, but at least his syrup has been found:
    8 points
  18. A midnight raid of the sewing box secured some more thread, I hope Stubby approves of the additional rope! Reprimands have been sent to all the goods porters involved and assurances have been provided that it won't happen again
    8 points
  19. 1920s aerial views of Cardiff's "timber quarter" - aka East Tyndall Street, home of timber importers galore, Robinson, David; John Bland; Alexander's to name but a few . The sidings at bottom left (in the first image) are Long Dyke Junc. and the GWR SWML is visible on the left. . Also in view, GKIS 'New Dowlais' Works, rebranded on nationalisation to BSC East Moors. . Brian R
    8 points
  20. Just found this picture - taken at Westbury in 1978!
    8 points
  21. Hi Mikkel, I'd forgotten all about this ! With my move earlier this year and other matters I've gone over to the dark side and am now building O Gauge locomotives ( which you probably already know about anyway ), the Dean Goods nearly completed, an Armstrong Goods part finished, a Mitchell 45xx kit being back dated to a 44xx class + other things relevant to my proposed Edwardian based layout. The Broad Gauge "bits" are still wrapped up in their boxes and as I'm totally involved with my new O Gauge layout and all that goes with it I very much doubt they will see the
    8 points
  22. In my case the whisky is often the cause of the modelling catastrophes, not part of the solution...
    8 points
  23. The problem with having this attitude is that trains do not exist in a vacuum, and if you become too narrowly focused on them, you just end up with yet another peco-on-plywood. If that's what you're happy with then by all means don't let anyone stop you, but this post or indeed really anything I've ever posted on RMweb aren't really aimed at those people. The fact is that (some) people care enough about structures not to put an LMS signal box on a GWR layout, and they care about scale enough to want platforms that match realistic train lengths. If you ignore the interplay between structur
    8 points
  24. Excellent news. Kindly enter the launch vehicle Mr Trump. Mr Johnson, yes you can bring your friends Jacob and Nigel with you .....
    8 points
  25. The interior shot is especially evocative Andrew.
    8 points
  26. I have to agree with TangoOscarMike, Compound, Jonboy et al. The buttons allow you to show your appreciation when you have nothing further to add. To me, they are better than Plonker123 quoting a long post and then saying "wow!!", meaning I have scrolled through half a page of repeated text, for nothing, whilst clogging up the system. The likes are also directly attached to the post in question. When you consider the ramblings of Castle Aching and Tony Wright's threads, and many others, I suppose you need to quote something, otherwise a comment without context would be meaningless, but when I
    8 points
  27. Well, its a rather rough thing. The gearmotors are I think for model boats, the rest is bits box. It must be about 20 years old, I might have a go at a new one with some of these good gearmotors from china. The hollow pivot shaft of the derrick is the bit of brass just protruding from the black gear.
    8 points
  28. Dave hopefully I've uploaded the photo correctly. Here are the sides exactly as returned from Slaters, what do you think? Malcolm
    8 points
  29. As I recall, you can fool some of the people all of the time ... Well done.
    8 points
  30. I don't think it works in that location, either - too much shoe-horned in and it 'fights' with the Church tower in the backscene. You could make the tower a part of the backscene at the other end, as suggested below, where I've grafted in part of bgman's splendid tower behind the trees:
    8 points
  31. Hi Dave, Much like yourself I have wrestled with possibly putting a water tower onto my as yet unbuilt layout. Hope you don't mind the intrusion with my scratch built effort but its here to show what a 90mm x 105mm footprint would be like basically. If anyone wanted to be pedantic about the use of a water tower on a branch terminus then there are plenty of discussions elsewhere ( hopefully not on your Blog please ! ) and I am just portraying mine as an example of a smaller ( ? ) tower that would fit. I don't think you would spoil what is a beauti
    8 points
  32. EDIT: Had a change of heart; thought I'd solder it back together.
    8 points
  33. These sorts of quotes ought to be compiled into a bingo card, for use by exhibitors at exhibitions, each being ticked off when mentioned by a viewing punter...
    8 points
  34. Haha, thanks everyone, we need a bit of fun in these dark times. The snowboarder certainly isn't me. I do a much better 180 Rewind.
    7 points
  35. Just a few night shots to show off the under roof section. I quite like this shot - look at those superb valves and cocks under the cab. It's a beautifully detailed model. A final shot of the whole layout. The points are all push pull and the frogs are juiced by the blades, as in the old days, and as long as you keep the blade contacts clean they give no trouble at all. I'm rather proud of the small control panel and took my time with it. All of the connections are push together types and were salvaged fro
    7 points
  36. Yes they are MJT. the low height ones, though both sizes are useful. A sideways pic. Just solder it all up generously then run a 2mm reamer through it. Perhaps not quite as free running as a pinpoint in a brass bearing, but their usefulness is the key . Dart castings do a good range . A couple of pics of the Lashing points. Not very good pics, its at the limit of what I can see. The plate and O-- shaped bit are bits of etch. Shackle, bolt and ring are 0.3 ns wire. Old fashioned lead solder and bakers fluid to fix it all together . The trick
    7 points
  37. If you remember I used the highly sophisticated technique of plonk, press and hope for the best! I have to make a trip to the post office at some point next week so I will post you a stick with them all on.
    7 points
  38. Well done responding to all that Dave, must have taken you an hour! I like your proposal with the cutting. Now, about that village...
    7 points
  39. By way of contrast and perhaps further inspiration, this view is the superb underside of the canopy of Blackfriars Bridge whilst gracing the halls of the NEC last November. Unfortunately this view is not easy to see from the public side, more an occasional treat for the BFB team, so well worth sharing.
    7 points
  40. Hi Russ, Yes "Sherton Abbas" although fictitious is set in Dorset. I took the name from Thomas Hardy's Wessex novels and is what he renamed Sherbourne. Here's a map that I found online, so hopefully is in the public domain. Thanks Russ! There are some rather nice wagon loads drying on the work bench as we speak
    7 points
  41. There is a sketch in Bradley’s book, perhaps the same as you used. When the SER became independant of the Croydon and Brighton loco committee, they went through a phase of long boiler engines, and this one was part of the goods design in 1845, six from Nasymth, 95-100, and four from Tayleur, 119-122. The Canterbury and Whitstable had opened with stationary engine haulage for most of the length, which proved unsatisfactory, and the line was taken over by the SER and rebuilt for loco haulage throughout. 120 and 121 went to work the section. All the class had boiler rebuilds later on, 121 wasn’t
    7 points
  42. I built a High Level chassis (in EM for Pendon, body by Guy Williams) for a pannier and can say it went together very well indeed. Dave.
    7 points
  43. Rod and I are very grateful to CK for his splendid efforts in bog making. It's a splendid rendition which has captured the look of the small building albeit rather ornate with the lovely cupola. It is believed that it's now used as an S & T store. The stops from Mike Franks are a delight and Tim's weathering is excellent. CK to the rescue as time was rapidly running out before S4um! Still a mountain of work to be done!
    7 points
  44. Perhaps they 'liked' it ironically? Interesting and much in what you say. It's preferable to post a comment, but, realistically, there is not always the time to do so. Further, some content that I like or find skillful lies outside my areas of main interest or knowledge and, really, I wouldn't have anything of value to contribute! Simply replying "wow!" each time would just be a long-hand version of the like button! What you did not mention is the addictive endorphin release of social media approbation, to which our 'like' buttons are cousins, and which is
    7 points
  45. Brilliant! And educational! Somewhat tangentially I am reminded of Trumpton and Miss Lovelace in particular: Have you thought about animation? Netflix might come a-knocking...
    7 points
  46. Dave, I've found the one ( just one so far ! ) that I made about 6 months ago after looking at the Appreciation website and came up with this.... I just need to build the layout to plonk it on now ! G
    7 points
  47. Thanks for the kind words Pete. Yes that is the trusty Sketchup. I've found it an indispensable aid. One of the things I'd been doing with it is, in the hopes I might teach myself ECC's tricks, using it to model real life buildings from various works, with a combination of measuring satellite images and scaling from reference photos. Some very interesting things happen when you do this: if you have one dimension that is "off", it could be the height of a doorway or the pitch of a roof, it will throw everything else out of whack until you trace back to the root error. Y
    7 points
  48. Run a 'King' with 14 behind, set the points, put the controller on max then walk away & have an extended lunch... As you say most punters would never notice. HOWEVER 'Clutton' has also been seen & appreciated by many - trouble is they're rarely as vocal as the great unwashed... Regs Ian
    7 points
  49. Lets not forget some of the nerks behind the layouts. The loud, bigheaded ones that think that their layout is the best thing ever 'cos its been in a magazine. The ones that are too arrogant to answer polite questions, believing that we should all be expert modellers and can recognise, for example, Smiths couplings when we see them. The ones that seem suprised that someone under 50 or who doesn't fit into the modeller stereotype could ask an intelligent question or show some knowledge about, well, anything. The ones that are too busy chatting to their mates to run anything, even though there's
    7 points
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