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  1. Carrying on ... The sides have the floor section removed and the cantrail fold cut back to 2mm. small brass blocks at cantrail height and a 2mm brass bar at floor level to stiffen it up. Note the holes match up with those tabs. A coat of primer on to seal it all. Then the sides. I mentioned those tabs. Well, they are not brass, but tinplate. Cut from this kind of paper fastener, convenient 5 mm strips of 10 thou tinplate. So with magnets in the holes in the side support bar and in the little blocks at cantrail height I can just attach and remove the sides as many times as I like. Now I can well imagine folk thinking that all that is a lot of messing about. Why not just build the coach , then paint it and line it ? Well, therein lies the problem. I am not good at painting and lining. So, for me being able to do that with the sides on the flat makes the chance of success a bit greater. If I make a mess it is just a side to strip, not a whole coach. Ok, the next three……
    20 points
  2. I am impressed by your in-depth research on this subject! Vintners' Yard included a mere token representation to create the atmosphere of horse drawn traffic. Evidently, I need to spread it about more generously. Best wishes Eric
    14 points
  3. A couple of darker pictures to show the lighting. I think I got it about right, these would be nowhere near as bright as modern stock. They look ok to the eye, but I found it difficult to photograph. Gives an idea anyway. And another just or fun.
    13 points
  4. If you are going to the trouble of making an extra board that can only be used at shows I'd be tempted to go the whole hog and do another full size baseboard with that engine shed scene you talked about. Would an extra board fit in your normal transport? Few of the pictures we didn't use in the MRJ article, Jerry
    13 points
  5. Boiler more or less done and some of the ‘sticky-uppy bits’ added. The gearbox under the boiler is clearly evident at the moment but should be hidden once the drivers and splashers are in place.
    13 points
  6. So, a wee update. Bit of a jump from the last pic but I’ve almost completed the body. There are still a few details to attach and some of the bits are just balanced in place for the photo. All soldering is complete and de-greasing is done, so a bit of filling, glueing and painting to follow. Then I can finish off the chassis, which to be fair I should have done before getting too carried away with the top half, but what the heck. Sometimes you just gotta live life on the edge!
    12 points
  7. Dammit, this stuff looks so tempting. TBG, I think you're employed by the model aircraft business to infiltrate the railway modelling hobby. I hope they're paying you well because it's almost working. If it had a copper-capped chimney my last defences would crumble.
    11 points
  8. When providing images for a magazine we photographed Alloa with among other things a low angle lens with a min aperture of f43. This was used for close ups but also allowed good depth of field but actually worked too well at times with the very long exposures giving clarity to a bus win an over bridge 30 feet away making the picture look unrealistic! Cameras were Nikon bodies and all lenses Nikon but Canon Fuji or any of the other big names will all do similar lenses. We were fortunate in that we had access to the camera bodies and hired the special lense needed which cost wise was surprisingly reasonable. However..a decent camera phone will often give you exactly what you want without any of the expense and it can be slotted into areas where a dslr wont fit. Nikon D90 and stock short zoom f22 @ 0.5 sec showing reasonable dof. Again Nikon body but at f29 @ 6.5 secs. Layout is 34ft long and far end in pic close to 30feet. Finally a pic using the iphone and not even my later iphone X with the better camera but a 5S. The ability to get the phone into places where the big cameras can't go is a huge advantage as is its ability to auto compensate for low light and gives decent dof as long as you hold it steady.
    11 points
  9. Hi. This will probably be my last comment on this subject, as I have suffered enough high blood pressure when I've thought about it. As if by magic, this is what Waterman and his company have done to my £455.00 ; yes you did read correctly, attached is a scan of the cheque I've received of the Receivers of Just Like The Real Thing, for the princely sum of £0.47. So much for the empathy that Waterman says he has for all things railway !! Don't think I need to say any more................ So I won't.
    11 points
  10. “No, not the perway hut, all you burn is cut up sleepers, think of the creosote” ”Goods office all you got is coal, think of the sulphur taste” “oh,..er...?” ”got it! lose some hardwood packing out of the breakdown van!” ”brilliant! oak smoked!”
    10 points
  11. This evening’s test was to see if Little England would actually pull six cast white metal 1st class carriages on a level road, and... “Oh ye of little faith”... it did! But, (and there’s always a ‘but’), it would only do it bunker first and the gears make quite a racket! I also need to adjust the spring loading on the front axle as the wheels slide a bit. Perhaps a weighted collar around the axle would help. For the sake of BBC style balance, I also tried my 0-4-2 on the same rake and it strolled quietly away with them like they weren’t there! I love that engine..!
    10 points
  12. Thanks folks! I have these two shots of the front. It’s nearly done but you can see in the second image the Grange Road Bridge still needs painting, railings, weathering and setting in place.
    10 points
  13. That was taken at the west end of Burngullow sidings, at the old slurry loading area. This was abandoned in 1990 when it was replaced with the new slurry plant, which consisted of a covered slurry loading shed and a covered tank wagon washing shed. 'Images of Industrial & Narrow Gauge Railways - Cornwall' is a different book. Maurice produced another book titled Cornwall Narrow Gauge through the middleton press. You might be able to find a copy through amazon or ebay. With regards to how the dries operated, I have attached a photo of a scale drawing of a cross-section through a typical dry as a visual aid. As you can see, the dry was built into a hillside, with the settling tanks at a higher level on the right, and the tracks at a lower level on the left. This was not the absolute rule as some were built differently, and there were variations in the difference of height, but this is generally the way it was done. The area with the piled clay was known as the "linhay", pronounced linney, and the raised section beside it was known as the pan. The total section width of the building would typically be in the region of 35' to 55', with a total length (for standard gauge rail served kilns) of 210' to 350', however non rail served and narrow gauge served kilns were typically smaller, sometimes only 100' to 150' in length. The settling tanks "behind" the dry would be approx 7' deep, circa 40' wide, and as much as 100' in length, their length being perpendicular to the long axis of the dry. Note that "dry" and "kiln" can be used interchangeably, with their official name being "pan kiln". A "hypocaust" style heated floor ran the length of the dry, made up of brick flues on 18" centres spanned by special porous pan tiles - this was the "pan" and it would usually be some 9' to 18' in width, 18" to 24" in depth, and usually approx 12' shorter in length than the building. A furnace house at the "fire end" would consist of one grate per 4 flues, and this was usually housed in either a lean-to or gabled structure, it's floor often being level with the linhay floor, but sometimes slightly higher depending on the steepness of the hillside the dry was built on. At the opposite end was the chimney, generally 10 feet in width at the bottom, tapering to 5 feet at the top, and around 75' in total height, with two thirds of it's structure being of stone, one third brick. Between the chimney and the pan flues would be a damper, simply a large steel sheet operated by a lever or counterbalanced rope. The damper would be used to strike a balance between keeping heat in the pan and drawing draft for the fires. Too much damper and the fire burns weak, too little damper and you end up with entrained ash dropping out of suspension in the flues. A periodic maintenance task with dries was to lift up the pan tiles to shovel out ash, not a pleasant task. Clay slurry would be piped to the feed end of the settling tanks, which was the end furthest from the dry, and allowed to settle. The doorways between the settling tanks and the dry would be boarded with so called button boards, which possessed holes for placing corks. The cork holes would remain unplugged as the tank filled, allowing clarified water to flow out into the drain gutter inside the dry. As the tank filled, the cork 'buttons' would be placed in the holes, and so the next board up would allow the clear water to discharge, thus the tank would build with settled clay. Once this process finished, tracks in the settling tank allowed settled clay to be trammed into the dry from the settling tanks in the small wagon pictured in the diagram, which would be positioned on the travelling bridge and moved to the appropriate spot along the pan. Here it would be dumped out and allowed to dry. Moisture would typically be drawn through the pan tile, such that both steam and smoke emerged from the chimney. Once dry, the pan would be shovelled off into the linhay below, where it would sit in piles to await loading for onward transit. The drop-off between the linhay and the rails was usually known as the loading edge or wharf, and it's depth generally depended on the type of wagon or type of packaging being used. For instance with casks or bags, it was usually preferable to have a loading edge height of 4' above the railhead, as this put the linhay floor level with the wagon floor. But in the case of lump clay, a loading edge height of 6' to 7'6" was preferable, as this put the linhay floor level with the top of the wagon. By the 1930s many of these pan kilns had been adapted to work with filter presses. The process of shoveling wet clay into wagons and then tramming them into the dry was known as a "muck wagon kiln", but when a press was used they were known as "press kilns" or "press house kilns". These presses, usually a pair contained within a structure called the "press house" generally located centrally among the settling tanks and against the back wall of the dry, consisted of circa 100 approx 4' square cast iron recessed plates hung on an I-beam girder suspended between two cast iron bulkheads. The plates, dressed with filter cloths, would be mechanically or hydraulically pressed together to form a watertight seal. Clay slurry would then be pumped in to the press plates by electric centrifugal pumps from the settling tanks at pressure. Each plate had a hole in the centre through which the slurry could move from plate to plate until the entire press was full. Clay would then build up in the space between the two cloths as pressure increased, with filtered water on the other side of the cloth leaving the plate through drain holes at their bottom corners. Once pressure reached a certain point indicating that the press was full, the pump would be stopped and the feed valve closed. A drain valve would then be opened, allowing the unfiltered slurry in the centre of the press to escape and return to the settling tanks. Once this cycle had been completed, the press would be opened, and the "filter cakes" would be dropped down onto wagons waiting beneath the press. These wagons would be run inside the dry onto the traversing bridge and dumped onto the pan, with the cakes to be broken up into smaller lumps. The former doorways leading into each settling tank would be bricked up, and pipes would run from them inside the dry to bring settled clay to the press house. The clarified water would be skimmed from the tank using a contraption known as a "banjo", this consisted of a pipe in a T shape, with the head of the T having a slot through which water could enter. The banjo was fitted on a pivot so that it could be raised and lowered using a rope on a spool, and the operator would watch for the colour of the water exiting into the gutter to make sure he hadn't lowered it too far. Since the clay tended to settle uniformly across the floor of the settling tank, men would be tasked with "shyvering" or "poling" the tanks - this task involved using a long pole with a flat blade at the end to "push" the settled clay toward the drain. This was an arduous task which had to be conducted in all weathers. This settled clay was usually pumped to a smaller tank immediately next to the press house, and it was from this tank that the presses would draw their feed. Within the linhay, by the 1950s sometimes small front end loaders were employed. Usually this would be a Muir Hill LH1. Some dries had a conveyor belt bringing dried clay up to a bagging machine, which was a big hopper with a screw conveyor beneath it - a bag could be slid over the end of the screw conveyor, which could be run until the bag was full, greatly reducing the amount of time it took to shovel clay into a bag. This stuff is possibly a bit ahead of your intended era. I would strongly recommend looking into the Gothers Tramway (pictured below) and the Hendra Tramway, the details for which can be found in Maurice's books. The dry in the picture is 250' x 45', but a much smaller one existed at the Gothers complex a mere 150' x 38'. There were several rail served dries in the Bodmin area apart from just Wenford. You are correct that they are not well documented, but I do believe Maurice Dart mentions them in his East Cornwall Mineral Railways book.
    10 points
  14. Hi Al, I do indeed Not a Buffalo, but a 2021 class saddle tank. I built it with a rigid chassis, which in retrospect was a mistake. All my other locos have sprung compensation and run much more smoothly because of it. The plan is to fit some Slater's sprung hornblocks, but I need to source some split coupling rods from somewhere. Hopefully it'll be ready for Telford!
    10 points
  15. Well, I have an update. The fascia contains the lighting and forms a separate unit, it will sit on top of the layout. I also wanted it to hold the fiddle yard when transported or stored. The fiddle yard sits within a compartment on top of the fascia. It is retained by way of an interference fit and does not require any fastners. Rob.
    10 points
  16. Ok, a very harsh closeup. Not perfect, but better than I could do by hand.
    9 points
  17. Here are some photographs of the finished main station building.
    9 points
  18. Just a couple of update pictures. A slighty alternative view of the Fowler showing a stronger sunlight streaming effect and one of the front of the North Screen taken from the overbridge.
    9 points
  19. Many thanks Matt! You have a good point regarding the horses' imprint on their surroundings. I am currently adding some strategically positioned manure, so that should help a bit. I hadn't considered their hoof marks, though. It may be too late for this layout, as they should perhaps be imprinted while the groundcover is still wet. Will give it some thought. Good idea to add some straw. I like a relatively uncluttered look, but a lot can be indicated with a few bits in the right place. A proper manure pit will be built on the adjoining module that I am planning. I very much like that photo of Arthur Challis. I'm afraid coal merchants have been a bit marginalised at Farthing so far. Even the single coal trolley present has been shamelessly re-purposed! But I have a vague plan to build a whole layout/module just for coal merchants. There is a very tempting and modellable photo in GWR Goods Services 2A, showing Slough's extension mileage yard. It includes two grounded vans and a grounded coach + lots of coal bins. Great stuff.
    9 points
  20. This bank holiday weekend has seen the completion of the railmotor steam unit and I`m glad to say it fits into the body work without any problems..... The upright boiler part is held in place by two screws at the rear , so is removable for motor servicing despite all the pipe work.
    9 points
  21. Mikkel this layout used Chincilla sand however I coloured it first using cheap black water colour in a jam jar and then left it to dry a couple of days in the jar before putting the lid on and shaking to split the clumps up Nick B
    9 points
  22. Meanwhile, back at the shed...... last night I wrestled with making no less than three cones and a round tube which played havoc with my arthritic fingers..... Pondering about using a screw fixing to keep the boiler attached to the bogie...but at a later date. There are a myriad of lost wax boiler parts to be fitted later. I`ve decided to push forward with making the un-powered bogie and the Railmotor body completed before super detailing when all the complex parts have been made.
    9 points
  23. The valve gear is small and there is not much wriggle room for errors. Pleasingly the kit etches are accurate and if you take time enough a satisfactory mechanism is easily achievable. The gearbox is a simple fold up etch and fits the bogie innards very well.... The kit provides some lovely front axle bearing castings to help with the tightness of space behind the slide bars. All in all a very enjoyable build so far. This kit is for an` experienced` modeller.... now there`s a funny thing. `Experience` well you can be a modeller of 40 years plus and have achieved one experience or you can be a modeller of one year and have achieved 40 experiences. I would say that if you feel confident and competent and not scared of soldering then this kit is for you.... Now back to Dave and his Sherton Abbas layout where a Steam Railcar would fit in nicely.... An enjoyable interlude at Sherton last seen by me at ` Telfords End ` while I return to the shed........................
    9 points
  24. Beautiful work as always, and fascinating too. My stables for Bricklayers Arms are nearing completion so my thoughts are turning to hay so your article is very timely and extremely useful. I will be shamelessly copying a few techniques here especially the use of plumbers hemp. Thank you.
    9 points
  25. Thanks, will keep that in mind. Maybe no music either! It is! You must have missed it. There's even a map, drawn up by that Tolkien fellow.
    9 points
  26. I'm pleased to report that wagon 60172 has been sent back to the Midlands and has returned to Sherton Abbas with a load Irritatingly one of the packing cases hasn't cast properly and has a flaw on it's side which I'll need to rectify! Why do I only notice these things after I've posted the picture
    9 points
  27. Ah yes, I had forgotten about those. Here is one of them:
    9 points
  28. Beautifully executed and photographed - it is a splendid trigger for the imagination - I can hear those carts rumbling along the roadway! Thank you for the idea about magnetic fencing usually, feature like this are a real pain when cleaning a layout. You make it look very simple but each of those trees is a work of art in its own right. The whole demonstrates that "small is beautiful" Mike
    8 points
  29. I enjoyed it too! There's already a video from the exhibition online, Sherton Abbas is at 30:16 (and Modbury at 6:40).
    8 points
  30. The Sabre was problematic at any height, and in the early days, the Typhoon's airframe also gave many problems - all very stressful for the MAP at the time. The Whirlwind's airframe was built around the Peregrine, which was a much smaller engine than the Merlin - so the Merlin was never an option, they were simply to big and heavy. All the time and effort went into developing the Merlins, so the Peregrine and the Whirlwind both withered on the vine. The Typhoon never made the grade as a fighter, because, quite apart from the problems with the Sabre's reliability, the Typhoon's wing was very thick. Great for strength and housing cannons, but it had a very low Critical Mach Number - a problem many other types of that period suffered from, such as the P38. The similar-looking Tempest had an entirely new, and much thinner wing, and was a much better machine that used the Sabre and the Centaurus. The Tempest was developed into Centaurus-powered the Fury and Sea Fury, both excellent machines, though the Centaurus was also not without it's problems.
    8 points
  31. Apart from a good clean up the external build is now in the bag !
    8 points
  32. 8 points
  33. Haha, thanks everyone, we need a bit of fun in these dark times. The snowboarder certainly isn't me. I do a much better 180 Rewind.
    8 points
  34. Aha, two sheets to the wind, eh? Not sure where Donald Trump has disappeared to, but at least his syrup has been found:
    8 points
  35. Simon these are fascinating blogs! Please keep them coming....
    8 points
  36. A midnight raid of the sewing box secured some more thread, I hope Stubby approves of the additional rope! Reprimands have been sent to all the goods porters involved and assurances have been provided that it won't happen again
    8 points
  37. 1920s aerial views of Cardiff's "timber quarter" - aka East Tyndall Street, home of timber importers galore, Robinson, David; John Bland; Alexander's to name but a few . The sidings at bottom left (in the first image) are Long Dyke Junc. and the GWR SWML is visible on the left. . Also in view, GKIS 'New Dowlais' Works, rebranded on nationalisation to BSC East Moors. . Brian R
    8 points
  38. Just found this picture - taken at Westbury in 1978!
    8 points
  39. Hi Mikkel, I'd forgotten all about this ! With my move earlier this year and other matters I've gone over to the dark side and am now building O Gauge locomotives ( which you probably already know about anyway ), the Dean Goods nearly completed, an Armstrong Goods part finished, a Mitchell 45xx kit being back dated to a 44xx class + other things relevant to my proposed Edwardian based layout. The Broad Gauge "bits" are still wrapped up in their boxes and as I'm totally involved with my new O Gauge layout and all that goes with it I very much doubt they will see the light off day for quite some time. Having read your post which detailed the use of various transfers on your lovely 4mm Dean Goods I gave Fox Transfers a ring today and can finally finish off the cab side lining, so thank you for helping indirectly, I've been searching for some 7mm transfers for ages and didn't realise they produced some. As a Sunday project I started to convert this die cast model to something more suitable to "plonk" on my layout... Dis-assembled and then primed... First coats applied... ( Sunday night ) And here we are as of this evening... Roughly assembled to get an overall idea of what it will finally look like. G
    8 points
  40. In my case the whisky is often the cause of the modelling catastrophes, not part of the solution...
    8 points
  41. The problem with having this attitude is that trains do not exist in a vacuum, and if you become too narrowly focused on them, you just end up with yet another peco-on-plywood. If that's what you're happy with then by all means don't let anyone stop you, but this post or indeed really anything I've ever posted on RMweb aren't really aimed at those people. The fact is that (some) people care enough about structures not to put an LMS signal box on a GWR layout, and they care about scale enough to want platforms that match realistic train lengths. If you ignore the interplay between structures and trains, what operational interest do you really even have? Trains have to come from and go to somewhere... unless you're content to watch a roundy roundy. Now personally, I suspect that the real reason for the lack of good representations of the trackside element of the china clay industry is entirely down to the lack of good reference material on the subject, and very little else. If you want to know how long and wide the average station platform is, or find drawings for a standard GWR signal box, guaranteed you can find that information in more than one book. But to the best of my knowledge there is no single source for similar information as it relates to china clay trains. The whole point of my efforts on RMweb have been to try to provide some of this information, but maybe I really should just take it a step further and publish a book, both in print and as an e-book. That way the info is there for those who want it, and those who don't give a toss can simply give it a miss and carry on.
    8 points
  42. Excellent news. Kindly enter the launch vehicle Mr Trump. Mr Johnson, yes you can bring your friends Jacob and Nigel with you .....
    8 points
  43. The interior shot is especially evocative Andrew.
    8 points
  44. I have to agree with TangoOscarMike, Compound, Jonboy et al. The buttons allow you to show your appreciation when you have nothing further to add. To me, they are better than Plonker123 quoting a long post and then saying "wow!!", meaning I have scrolled through half a page of repeated text, for nothing, whilst clogging up the system. The likes are also directly attached to the post in question. When you consider the ramblings of Castle Aching and Tony Wright's threads, and many others, I suppose you need to quote something, otherwise a comment without context would be meaningless, but when I do this I try to edit out as much as possible of the original text to keep things concise. I suspect things are different on Facebook etc.
    8 points
  45. Well, its a rather rough thing. The gearmotors are I think for model boats, the rest is bits box. It must be about 20 years old, I might have a go at a new one with some of these good gearmotors from china. The hollow pivot shaft of the derrick is the bit of brass just protruding from the black gear.
    8 points
  46. I don't think it works in that location, either - too much shoe-horned in and it 'fights' with the Church tower in the backscene. You could make the tower a part of the backscene at the other end, as suggested below, where I've grafted in part of bgman's splendid tower behind the trees:
    8 points
  47. Hi Dave, Much like yourself I have wrestled with possibly putting a water tower onto my as yet unbuilt layout. Hope you don't mind the intrusion with my scratch built effort but its here to show what a 90mm x 105mm footprint would be like basically. If anyone wanted to be pedantic about the use of a water tower on a branch terminus then there are plenty of discussions elsewhere ( hopefully not on your Blog please ! ) and I am just portraying mine as an example of a smaller ( ? ) tower that would fit. I don't think you would spoil what is a beautifully modelled layout and also Rule 1 applies eh ? If you want one and it blends into the scene then I for one say do it, it doesn't look to be spoiling anything by being there. G
    8 points
  48. EDIT: Had a change of heart; thought I'd solder it back together.
    8 points
  49. These sorts of quotes ought to be compiled into a bingo card, for use by exhibitors at exhibitions, each being ticked off when mentioned by a viewing punter...
    8 points
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