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Showing content with the highest reputation since 22/01/20 in Blog Comments

  1. If you are going to the trouble of making an extra board that can only be used at shows I'd be tempted to go the whole hog and do another full size baseboard with that engine shed scene you talked about. Would an extra board fit in your normal transport? Few of the pictures we didn't use in the MRJ article, Jerry
    13 points
  2. Boiler more or less done and some of the ‘sticky-uppy bits’ added. The gearbox under the boiler is clearly evident at the moment but should be hidden once the drivers and splashers are in place.
    13 points
  3. So, a wee update. Bit of a jump from the last pic but I’ve almost completed the body. There are still a few details to attach and some of the bits are just balanced in place for the photo. All soldering is complete and de-greasing is done, so a bit of filling, glueing and painting to follow. Then I can finish off the chassis, which to be fair I should have done before getting too carried away with the top half, but what the heck. Sometimes you just gotta live life on the edge!
    12 points
  4. This evening’s test was to see if Little England would actually pull six cast white metal 1st class carriages on a level road, and... “Oh ye of little faith”... it did! But, (and there’s always a ‘but’), it would only do it bunker first and the gears make quite a racket! I also need to adjust the spring loading on the front axle as the wheels slide a bit. Perhaps a weighted collar around the axle would help. For the sake of BBC style balance, I also tried my 0-4-2 on the same rake and it strolled quietly away with them like they weren’t there! I love that engine..!
    10 points
  5. Beautiful work as always, and fascinating too. My stables for Bricklayers Arms are nearing completion so my thoughts are turning to hay so your article is very timely and extremely useful. I will be shamelessly copying a few techniques here especially the use of plumbers hemp. Thank you.
    9 points
  6. Thanks, will keep that in mind. Maybe no music either! It is! You must have missed it. There's even a map, drawn up by that Tolkien fellow.
    9 points
  7. Thanks folks! I have these two shots of the front. It’s nearly done but you can see in the second image the Grange Road Bridge still needs painting, railings, weathering and setting in place.
    9 points
  8. I'm pleased to report that wagon 60172 has been sent back to the Midlands and has returned to Sherton Abbas with a load Irritatingly one of the packing cases hasn't cast properly and has a flaw on it's side which I'll need to rectify! Why do I only notice these things after I've posted the picture
    9 points
  9. When painting my Edwardian period figures (Andrew Stadden), I initially prime them white, then use enamels to paint them. I always mix up colours (never using anything straight from the tin), and mix up 3 shades of the same colour, a base colour, one a little darker (by adding slightly more of the darkest colour used in the mix) for the shadows, and one a little lighter (by adding a touch of white) for the highlights. I tend to apply paint where it is needed with a very fine brush in the shadows rather than an all over wash, and dry brush the highlights. A few photos o
    8 points
  10. Thanks Miss P. A lot of belpaires there. I prefer a roundtop myself on these. Note the Armstrong smokebox door. Bigger and less dished than the Dean:
    8 points
  11. Aha, two sheets to the wind, eh? Not sure where Donald Trump has disappeared to, but at least his syrup has been found:
    8 points
  12. A midnight raid of the sewing box secured some more thread, I hope Stubby approves of the additional rope! Reprimands have been sent to all the goods porters involved and assurances have been provided that it won't happen again
    8 points
  13. 1920s aerial views of Cardiff's "timber quarter" - aka East Tyndall Street, home of timber importers galore, Robinson, David; John Bland; Alexander's to name but a few . The sidings at bottom left (in the first image) are Long Dyke Junc. and the GWR SWML is visible on the left. . Also in view, GKIS 'New Dowlais' Works, rebranded on nationalisation to BSC East Moors. . Brian R
    8 points
  14. Haha, thanks everyone, we need a bit of fun in these dark times. The snowboarder certainly isn't me. I do a much better 180 Rewind.
    7 points
  15. Simon these are fascinating blogs! Please keep them coming....
    7 points
  16. I had a chance to spray a coat of paint of the fencing and I think it pulls it all together nicely.
    7 points
  17. Just a few night shots to show off the under roof section. I quite like this shot - look at those superb valves and cocks under the cab. It's a beautifully detailed model. A final shot of the whole layout. The points are all push pull and the frogs are juiced by the blades, as in the old days, and as long as you keep the blade contacts clean they give no trouble at all. I'm rather proud of the small control panel and took my time with it. All of the connections are push together types and were salvaged fro
    7 points
  18. Yes they are MJT. the low height ones, though both sizes are useful. A sideways pic. Just solder it all up generously then run a 2mm reamer through it. Perhaps not quite as free running as a pinpoint in a brass bearing, but their usefulness is the key . Dart castings do a good range . A couple of pics of the Lashing points. Not very good pics, its at the limit of what I can see. The plate and O-- shaped bit are bits of etch. Shackle, bolt and ring are 0.3 ns wire. Old fashioned lead solder and bakers fluid to fix it all together . The trick
    7 points
  19. If you remember I used the highly sophisticated technique of plonk, press and hope for the best! I have to make a trip to the post office at some point next week so I will post you a stick with them all on.
    7 points
  20. Well done responding to all that Dave, must have taken you an hour! I like your proposal with the cutting. Now, about that village...
    7 points
  21. By way of contrast and perhaps further inspiration, this view is the superb underside of the canopy of Blackfriars Bridge whilst gracing the halls of the NEC last November. Unfortunately this view is not easy to see from the public side, more an occasional treat for the BFB team, so well worth sharing.
    7 points
  22. Hi Russ, Yes "Sherton Abbas" although fictitious is set in Dorset. I took the name from Thomas Hardy's Wessex novels and is what he renamed Sherbourne. Here's a map that I found online, so hopefully is in the public domain. Thanks Russ! There are some rather nice wagon loads drying on the work bench as we speak
    7 points
  23. Just found this picture - taken at Westbury in 1978!
    7 points
  24. You need this: (From Wickes website!)
    6 points
  25. Here is a crop of a photo I came across. It's a 7-plank O2, amply loaded with hay at Shipton under Wychwood. They would of course have been good for provender, with those high sides. Perhaps they were part of the reason that no further provender wagons were built.
    6 points
  26. Thanks Dave. Yes, all this business with sheets/tarps is tricky stuff to model, and quite time consuming too I find. You finish a wagon and think you're done. But then there's the couplings. And the weighting. And the load. And the tarp. And the ties/ropes. And that's just simple stuff like mine! Rest assured BTW. No blondes were harmed in the making of these models Hi Mike. Your horse-drawn Q1 was the first I saw in GWR red, I have often admired it. I think most people build the Q1 kit with the V-hanger in the central position, since there is no men
    6 points
  27. Hi Stephen, Nothing very high tech I'm afraid, I just use my thumbs as a lever and gently work along the side until the tumblehome curve matches the end profiles As long as you take your time brass is pretty forgiving really! BW Dave
    6 points
  28. Oh yes before I forget, I have a photo of the shed base in situe at the layout builders..
    6 points
  29. It's funny how a blog post like this can sit unnoticed for many months, and then come to light. I think the time has come to put in into RMweb-speak. Here goes: ME: "I prefer H0 to 00 for my British railway models" RANDOM PERSON: "So basically what you're saying is you hate 00. You also failed to mention EM, P4, and the hybrid 1:82 Liliput and Trix standard. Educate yourself". - Richard.
    6 points
  30. Wonderful stuff, that has quite brightened my day! "The unsheeted Open carried a shipment of Empty Promises. A local MP would pick it up later." Excellent!
    6 points
  31. Having built and exhibited Wheal Elizabeth, I’ve a real temptation to build another China clay layout. Not helped by the subsequent acquisition of Kernow’s PRAs and a Tiger hopper. I’ve got other layouts to finish first though!
    6 points
  32. How's this for your memory Vivian?
    6 points
  33. Thank you Mikkel. The story of the ancestors gets even better, because one of them drove a 'Badminton' class! That's more of a modelling challenge. We only know about that because an accident report records that he slipped and fell between the engine and the platform at Paddington!!! I think those engines marked the pinnacle of Victorian elegance Mike
    6 points
  34. By the way, here's one I made earlier: The turntable is a CD disc that rotates through 180 degrees - actually a bit more, it's a cam arrangement - using the coffee stirrer in the bottom right of the picture. Wiring is just two wires running up through the baseboard and soldered (it was made in the days when I was still willing to engage with this dark art) under the rails. The ballast is chinchilla dust. The sidings are rope shunted using the bollard (a push pin) to the right of the turntable.
    6 points
  35. Well worth all the effort, a splendid rendition of one of Mr Dean’s finest! I’m looking forward to seeing the Armstrong Goods that you obviously should tackle next BW Dave
    6 points
  36. Surely, it is the cast from East Enders, from 170 years ago? Best wishes Eric
    6 points
  37. Thanks everyone for their responses/contributions, it's given me lots to think about I've done a quick sketch of the kind of thing I was proposing, obviously the turnout would link the two lines in the drawing. Sketch of proposed board The idea of the front view blocker behind the "Beverage & Snacks" area is to restrict the view to only that from under the bridge. I've found at shows that people are just as interested in what's happening in the fiddle yard as on the scenic part of the layout and as Al & I operate the layout from the front we g
    6 points
  38. Hello Dave, I have been looking back at a few photographs of your wonderful layout, that I took at Telford last Autumn, and I have to say that, in my opinion, while your 3' addition may improve your ease of operation, I do not believe that it will either add or detract to the visual appeal of the layout. Your masterpiece, like any great novel, painting or motion picture, still requires the audience to use their little grey matter in order to interpret the overall image. We have to shut out or suspend our reality in order to enter the 'reality' of the model. I include two of my photographs
    6 points
  39. Yep , I can see that would help. Extending the embankment beyond the bridge would lose the big white space seen through the rh arch. But of course you will end up making it scenic, then you will need another scenic break, and er, another scenic section.....
    6 points
  40. Just wanted to share this great find that @Methuselah has made on Google Earth. It shows the two-storey stable block of Birmingham Hockley on the right (sic), still largely intact. Even the ramp for horses to access the upper floor is still there, now partly rebuilt as stairs. Note: Compare it with this period photo of the very same scene on the Warwickshire Railways site: https://www.warwickshirerailways.com/gwr/gwrhd682.htm And a bit closer: Google Earth coordinates : 52°29'27.00"N 1°55'20.13"W Google
    6 points
  41. Time for an update as the Lockdown has forced some shed work of late...….. Firstly the trackwork has had a dose of etch primer as I hate seeing unpainted rails or rails that have been painted and the paint is chipping off... I`ve used Clostermans etch primer and then airbrushed a mixture of Phoenix/Precision track enamels. Then onward with some polystyrene work
    6 points
  42. Mikkel;- Another one right up your alley. Reprocessed film from 1901. It's so good it's spooky. Great detail of the dress of working people in northern England in 1901. It's like looking through a time-travellers wormhole back a hundred and thirty years..... It's strangely addictive....
    6 points
  43. Paris, about 1890 - another amazing restoration. Sharpness, speed corrected, colour and sound added. Almost spooky.... Anyway - lots of horses...!
    6 points
  44. My good man, the GWR does not do bumps.
    6 points
  45. Mikkel, Strangely enough, I thought exactly that while working on this yesterday. Perhaps it was inspired by just having seen some pictures of new Stagecoach bus liveries that have bits of the 'beach ball' logo randomly applied to a single body colour. However, I have compromised this idea and will leave the inside of the body unpainted to show it pedigree. I surprises me how well the footplate looks in the pictures after a clean up with some scotch bright soft abrasive pads..... almost as good a nickel-silver. Thanks for your wide view and comments.
    6 points
  46. Thank you Mikkel. I use Slaters Plastikard sheets. They’re fine but you can’t mix bonds as the courses are slightly out which is really irritating. The other trick is on corners; score a groove in the back and bend the sheet round so you use it like a wrapper. That way your courses stay in line and you don’t get that giveaway joint all the way down the corner edge. I only discovered this half way through my project so some of the earlier buildings don’t have it and it shows. The best disguise for this is to pick out some of the corner bricks in a slightly darker shade,
    5 points
  47. Found this lovely photo today. Paddington Goods 1926. Looks as if the horses in the foreground are being carefully manouvered to avoid the weighbridge. Note the absence of a rail alongside the weighbridge. It does not seem to have been a requirement, especially in the pre-grouping years. Source: Getty images. Embedding permitted. I have been browsing photos to see if I could find any evidence of the GWR's own horse-drawn vehicles ever being weighed. No luck yet. I suppose it would mostly have been non-GWR vehicles, although a large single shipment carried on a GWR
    5 points
  48. Me too. My grandparents lived in Ramsgate and I can well remember the privy attached to the scullery out the back. I've included a communal night soil chamber for the row which is in one of the back yards. The circular stone lid is just visible in the photo of the two children on the wall. I have two final pics before I get back to modelling.
    5 points
  49. Well I had a go at the simple photo effect (it's free so no harm in trying), and the results made me smile. Thanks.
    5 points
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