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  1. I am impressed by your in-depth research on this subject! Vintners' Yard included a mere token representation to create the atmosphere of horse drawn traffic. Evidently, I need to spread it about more generously. Best wishes Eric
    14 points
  2. Dammit, this stuff looks so tempting. TBG, I think you're employed by the model aircraft business to infiltrate the railway modelling hobby. I hope they're paying you well because it's almost working. If it had a copper-capped chimney my last defences would crumble.
    11 points
  3. “No, not the perway hut, all you burn is cut up sleepers, think of the creosote” ”Goods office all you got is coal, think of the sulphur taste” “oh,..er...?” ”got it! lose some hardwood packing out of the breakdown van!” ”brilliant! oak smoked!”
    10 points
  4. This evening’s test was to see if Little England would actually pull six cast white metal 1st class carriages on a level road, and... “Oh ye of little faith”... it did! But, (and there’s always a ‘but’), it would only do it bunker first and the gears make quite a racket! I also need to adjust the spring loading on the front axle as the wheels slide a bit. Perhaps a weighted collar around the axle would help. For the sake of BBC style balance, I also tried my 0-4-2 on the same rake and it strolled quietly away with them like they weren’t there! I love that engine..!
    10 points
  5. Just a couple of update pictures. A slighty alternative view of the Fowler showing a stronger sunlight streaming effect and one of the front of the North Screen taken from the overbridge.
    9 points
  6. This bank holiday weekend has seen the completion of the railmotor steam unit and I`m glad to say it fits into the body work without any problems..... The upright boiler part is held in place by two screws at the rear , so is removable for motor servicing despite all the pipe work.
    9 points
  7. Meanwhile, back at the shed...... last night I wrestled with making no less than three cones and a round tube which played havoc with my arthritic fingers..... Pondering about using a screw fixing to keep the boiler attached to the bogie...but at a later date. There are a myriad of lost wax boiler parts to be fitted later. I`ve decided to push forward with making the un-powered bogie and the Railmotor body completed before super detailing when all the complex parts have been made.
    9 points
  8. The valve gear is small and there is not much wriggle room for errors. Pleasingly the kit etches are accurate and if you take time enough a satisfactory mechanism is easily achievable. The gearbox is a simple fold up etch and fits the bogie innards very well.... The kit provides some lovely front axle bearing castings to help with the tightness of space behind the slide bars. All in all a very enjoyable build so far. This kit is for an` experienced` modeller.... now there`s a funny thing. `Ex
    9 points
  9. Beautiful work as always, and fascinating too. My stables for Bricklayers Arms are nearing completion so my thoughts are turning to hay so your article is very timely and extremely useful. I will be shamelessly copying a few techniques here especially the use of plumbers hemp. Thank you.
    9 points
  10. The Sabre was problematic at any height, and in the early days, the Typhoon's airframe also gave many problems - all very stressful for the MAP at the time. The Whirlwind's airframe was built around the Peregrine, which was a much smaller engine than the Merlin - so the Merlin was never an option, they were simply to big and heavy. All the time and effort went into developing the Merlins, so the Peregrine and the Whirlwind both withered on the vine. The Typhoon never made the grade as a fighter, because, quite apart from the problems with the Sabre's reliability, the Typhoon's wing was very th
    8 points
  11. Here are some photographs of the finished main station building.
    8 points
  12. Apart from a good clean up the external build is now in the bag !
    8 points
  13. Many thanks Matt! You have a good point regarding the horses' imprint on their surroundings. I am currently adding some strategically positioned manure, so that should help a bit. I hadn't considered their hoof marks, though. It may be too late for this layout, as they should perhaps be imprinted while the groundcover is still wet. Will give it some thought. Good idea to add some straw. I like a relatively uncluttered look, but a lot can be indicated with a few bits in the right place. A proper manure pit will be built on the adjoining module that I am pla
    8 points
  14. Mikkel this layout used Chincilla sand however I coloured it first using cheap black water colour in a jam jar and then left it to dry a couple of days in the jar before putting the lid on and shaking to split the clumps up Nick B
    8 points
  15. I've been experimenting with my home made lighting rig (see my Folgate Street Blog) I made from an old over head projector to see how the lighting effects being planned might work out. I've sprayed on a bit more black to enhance the filthy state of the screen. Painting and cleaning the Screens wasn't too regular in the 20th C and they appeared much filthier prior to 1936 when it was last cleaned and painted. I'm clearly going to have to think something up if I want to create a more mottled, sun beam type effect when the mod
    8 points
  16. 8 points
  17. When painting my Edwardian period figures (Andrew Stadden), I initially prime them white, then use enamels to paint them. I always mix up colours (never using anything straight from the tin), and mix up 3 shades of the same colour, a base colour, one a little darker (by adding slightly more of the darkest colour used in the mix) for the shadows, and one a little lighter (by adding a touch of white) for the highlights. I tend to apply paint where it is needed with a very fine brush in the shadows rather than an all over wash, and dry brush the highlights. A few photos o
    8 points
  18. Thanks Miss P. A lot of belpaires there. I prefer a roundtop myself on these. Note the Armstrong smokebox door. Bigger and less dished than the Dean:
    8 points
  19. Aha, two sheets to the wind, eh? Not sure where Donald Trump has disappeared to, but at least his syrup has been found:
    8 points
  20. Simon these are fascinating blogs! Please keep them coming....
    8 points
  21. Stunning modelling and writing as usual Mikkel. A few "pointers" and responses to queries: Horses usually repeat their location for dropping manure: whether it be the same place in a stable, field or even a regular route. Seeing/smelling another horse droppings can sometimes cause a horse to produce, but of course only when it's ready - but that explains the postcard of the mews with the long line. Having the horse "produce" in the mews would be preferable to doing it en-route. You are correct on colour caused by input, and it does darken off quite quickl
    7 points
  22. Aha! What's brown and sounds like a bell? Dung!
    7 points
  23. A lot of careful brass bending and patient soldering to be done with this project. The body needs a lot of concentration to keep everything level and square. There is a novel way of using extra internal section dividers with longer tabs that protrude through the chassis to keep the roof in place. But it all seems to provide a removable roof for later internal detailing. ......and I made the sliding doors and windows fully functional. There has been a lot of work to get
    7 points
  24. Thanks Mike, Spent a few days on the trailing `fish belly` bogie which is quite a kit in itself...... Having assembled the basic bogie chassis I spent time piecing together all the brake rigging and white metal brake blocks and after a struggle trying to get it all in place decided that there was far too much risk of electrical shorting between the brake blocks and wheels....far too risky for an impending DCC sound set up. Also, I needed as much space as possible for unobtrusive wiper pickups so without all the brake
    7 points
  25. AKA 'Pouncing', although strictly speaking a proper pounce is made from a piece of oiled card which is then perforated with a needle to give a dotted outline. The card is then patted with a muslin bag filled with French Chalk which goes through the holes. When I was doing it, I just printed the design onto 80 gsm paper & chalked the back to transfer it rather as Mr Baker has done at Quorn. As to historical examples... There are plenty of examples showing a guide lines - top only if you're using the plank edge as a bottom guide - but very few showing anything else. I
    7 points
  26. Haha, thanks everyone, we need a bit of fun in these dark times. The snowboarder certainly isn't me. I do a much better 180 Rewind.
    7 points
  27. Thanks Dave. Yes, all this business with sheets/tarps is tricky stuff to model, and quite time consuming too I find. You finish a wagon and think you're done. But then there's the couplings. And the weighting. And the load. And the tarp. And the ties/ropes. And that's just simple stuff like mine! Rest assured BTW. No blondes were harmed in the making of these models Hi Mike. Your horse-drawn Q1 was the first I saw in GWR red, I have often admired it. I think most people build the Q1 kit with the V-hanger in the central position, since there is no men
    7 points
  28. I had a chance to spray a coat of paint of the fencing and I think it pulls it all together nicely.
    7 points
  29. How's this for your memory Vivian?
    7 points
  30. Just a few night shots to show off the under roof section. I quite like this shot - look at those superb valves and cocks under the cab. It's a beautifully detailed model. A final shot of the whole layout. The points are all push pull and the frogs are juiced by the blades, as in the old days, and as long as you keep the blade contacts clean they give no trouble at all. I'm rather proud of the small control panel and took my time with it. All of the connections are push together types and were salvaged fro
    7 points
  31. Eric "Winkle" Brown's favourite From Wikipaedia As regards his preferences Brown states: My favourite in the piston engine (era) is the de Havilland Hornet. For the simple reason it was over-powered. This is an unusual feature in an aircraft, you could do anything on one engine, almost, that you could do on two. It was a 'hot rod Mosquito' really, I always described it as like flying a Ferrari in the sky.
    6 points
  32. I remember building a 1/72 version of that almost 60 years ago - not to that standard, though!
    6 points
  33. I have vague memories of my father, a keen gardener, buying sacks of manure off a chap that sold it by the bag, Delivered by horse and cart, I reckon mid 60s. Probably a business going way back to the start of gardens and allotments. There is the old story: Two men, leaning on a fence watch a horse and cart go by. The horse generates a pile of manure. Says the first " och , ye should collect that and put it yer rhubarb " ... Says the second , " nay, I always put custard on mine " ..........
    6 points
  34. Superb modeling Mikkel. Detailed research, accurate observation and clever implementation. The end result looks spot on, that really does add to the look of a working stables.
    6 points
  35. Today's purchases. My wife doesn't wear tights but these were just £3. If the white pepper doesn't work it goes on the food The Pendon Paper also arrived, and it occurs to me that seeing these light groundcovers in past magazine articles about Pendon may have influenced my preference for very light yards. Note also the stable block!
    6 points
  36. Today I started the Railmotor body construction. My biggest concern was shaping the flat roof etch into a GWR shaped roof profile . It`s one thing shaping flat brass in 4mm but O Gauge is a major beast..... I dont possess any rolling bars, not that they would be a lot of use to me. But I wanted to get this worry out of the way so I could enjoy the rest of the build knowing I hav`nt got a black cloud hanging over me........... So it was study photos of the real thing and then find suitable diameter brush and broom handles and slowly work away by hand.
    6 points
  37. Sigh; you've done it again Mike. Absolutely brilliant!
    6 points
  38. Not much involving cheese got past Parmley, he later left the railway to co-found Appleby Creamery when the Express dairy shut. Not a circus train but I have got most of the vehicles together for the Last Farm Move on BR, from Gloucestershire to Wigtownshire in 1962. A pedigree beef herd needs a lot of Beetles...
    6 points
  39. One Saturday afternoon at Appleby in the 1990s, whilst clearing up after the day's various steam and deisel excursions, I found a carrier bag with a large full Wensleydale cheese in it, obviously left by one of the throng of tourists who had decamped from one of them for a couple of hours in town. Stationmaster and ex-cheesemaker Parmley (well, Railman, but it was definitely his station) was consulted, who recognised it and and believed that it belonged to a lady now heading back towards London via the WCML. He then produced a cheese corer from his pocket (!), sampled it and decla
    6 points
  40. A detail crop from a photo of Lambourn station in 1898. This was before the GWR take-over. At this point the LVR's wagons were LVR owned second-hand GWR GER and Metropolitan stock. Four sheeted hay/fodder wagons, though I can't make out what it says on them. Perhaps destined for the GWR provender store at Didcot, as per the discussion above. The GWR sheet used on the heavily loaded cart is a bit puzzling, as I doubt the GWR would have a cart here at this time. But what the GWR don't know doesn't hurt them, I suppose
    6 points
  41. Following on from this @kitpw sent the interesting description below of a sheet-shop. Thanks again, Kit! The source is Maclean, J. L “The British railway system: a description of the work performed in the principal departments” London, McCorquodale & Co., Ltd. 1883. “Still less is it conducive to the enjoyment of dinner to look through the sheet-shop and watch the process of coating the waggon covers, yet half an hour there will repay the inconvenient experience of nausea. We found huge bales of canvas being cut into lengths and sewed together firmly and rapidly at
    6 points
  42. Here is a crop of a photo I came across. It's a 7-plank O2, amply loaded with hay at Shipton under Wychwood. They would of course have been good for provender, with those high sides. Perhaps they were part of the reason that no further provender wagons were built.
    6 points
  43. Hi Stephen, Nothing very high tech I'm afraid, I just use my thumbs as a lever and gently work along the side until the tumblehome curve matches the end profiles As long as you take your time brass is pretty forgiving really! BW Dave
    6 points
  44. Oh yes before I forget, I have a photo of the shed base in situe at the layout builders..
    6 points
  45. It's funny how a blog post like this can sit unnoticed for many months, and then come to light. I think the time has come to put in into RMweb-speak. Here goes: ME: "I prefer H0 to 00 for my British railway models" RANDOM PERSON: "So basically what you're saying is you hate 00. You also failed to mention EM, P4, and the hybrid 1:82 Liliput and Trix standard. Educate yourself". - Richard.
    6 points
  46. Wonderful stuff, that has quite brightened my day! "The unsheeted Open carried a shipment of Empty Promises. A local MP would pick it up later." Excellent!
    6 points
  47. Having built and exhibited Wheal Elizabeth, I’ve a real temptation to build another China clay layout. Not helped by the subsequent acquisition of Kernow’s PRAs and a Tiger hopper. I’ve got other layouts to finish first though!
    6 points
  48. This may be of interest - perhaps a better scale - an old barge. Its remains have only been recently towed away. The original contractors gave up on it. I have photos of this vessel from the other side, in various stages of decay, if you are wanting to see the inside structure.
    6 points
  49. Thank you Mikkel. The story of the ancestors gets even better, because one of them drove a 'Badminton' class! That's more of a modelling challenge. We only know about that because an accident report records that he slipped and fell between the engine and the platform at Paddington!!! I think those engines marked the pinnacle of Victorian elegance Mike
    6 points
  50. By the way, here's one I made earlier: The turntable is a CD disc that rotates through 180 degrees - actually a bit more, it's a cam arrangement - using the coffee stirrer in the bottom right of the picture. Wiring is just two wires running up through the baseboard and soldered (it was made in the days when I was still willing to engage with this dark art) under the rails. The ballast is chinchilla dust. The sidings are rope shunted using the bollard (a push pin) to the right of the turntable.
    6 points
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