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  1. Carrying on ... The sides have the floor section removed and the cantrail fold cut back to 2mm. small brass blocks at cantrail height and a 2mm brass bar at floor level to stiffen it up. Note the holes match up with those tabs. A coat of primer on to seal it all. Then the sides. I mentioned those tabs. Well, they are not brass, but tinplate. Cut from this kind of paper fastener, convenient 5 mm strips of 10 thou tinplate. So with magnets in the holes in the side support bar and in the little blocks at cantrail height I can just attach and remove the sides as many times as I like. Now I can well imagine folk thinking that all that is a lot of messing about. Why not just build the coach , then paint it and line it ? Well, therein lies the problem. I am not good at painting and lining. So, for me being able to do that with the sides on the flat makes the chance of success a bit greater. If I make a mess it is just a side to strip, not a whole coach. Ok, the next three……
    20 points
  2. I am impressed by your in-depth research on this subject! Vintners' Yard included a mere token representation to create the atmosphere of horse drawn traffic. Evidently, I need to spread it about more generously. Best wishes Eric
    14 points
  3. A couple of darker pictures to show the lighting. I think I got it about right, these would be nowhere near as bright as modern stock. They look ok to the eye, but I found it difficult to photograph. Gives an idea anyway. And another just or fun.
    13 points
  4. Dammit, this stuff looks so tempting. TBG, I think you're employed by the model aircraft business to infiltrate the railway modelling hobby. I hope they're paying you well because it's almost working. If it had a copper-capped chimney my last defences would crumble.
    11 points
  5. “No, not the perway hut, all you burn is cut up sleepers, think of the creosote” ”Goods office all you got is coal, think of the sulphur taste” “oh,..er...?” ”got it! lose some hardwood packing out of the breakdown van!” ”brilliant! oak smoked!”
    10 points
  6. Ok, a very harsh closeup. Not perfect, but better than I could do by hand.
    9 points
  7. Here are some photographs of the finished main station building.
    9 points
  8. Just a couple of update pictures. A slighty alternative view of the Fowler showing a stronger sunlight streaming effect and one of the front of the North Screen taken from the overbridge.
    9 points
  9. Many thanks Matt! You have a good point regarding the horses' imprint on their surroundings. I am currently adding some strategically positioned manure, so that should help a bit. I hadn't considered their hoof marks, though. It may be too late for this layout, as they should perhaps be imprinted while the groundcover is still wet. Will give it some thought. Good idea to add some straw. I like a relatively uncluttered look, but a lot can be indicated with a few bits in the right place. A proper manure pit will be built on the adjoining module that I am planning. I very much like that photo of Arthur Challis. I'm afraid coal merchants have been a bit marginalised at Farthing so far. Even the single coal trolley present has been shamelessly re-purposed! But I have a vague plan to build a whole layout/module just for coal merchants. There is a very tempting and modellable photo in GWR Goods Services 2A, showing Slough's extension mileage yard. It includes two grounded vans and a grounded coach + lots of coal bins. Great stuff.
    9 points
  10. This bank holiday weekend has seen the completion of the railmotor steam unit and I`m glad to say it fits into the body work without any problems..... The upright boiler part is held in place by two screws at the rear , so is removable for motor servicing despite all the pipe work.
    9 points
  11. Mikkel this layout used Chincilla sand however I coloured it first using cheap black water colour in a jam jar and then left it to dry a couple of days in the jar before putting the lid on and shaking to split the clumps up Nick B
    9 points
  12. Meanwhile, back at the shed...... last night I wrestled with making no less than three cones and a round tube which played havoc with my arthritic fingers..... Pondering about using a screw fixing to keep the boiler attached to the bogie...but at a later date. There are a myriad of lost wax boiler parts to be fitted later. I`ve decided to push forward with making the un-powered bogie and the Railmotor body completed before super detailing when all the complex parts have been made.
    9 points
  13. The valve gear is small and there is not much wriggle room for errors. Pleasingly the kit etches are accurate and if you take time enough a satisfactory mechanism is easily achievable. The gearbox is a simple fold up etch and fits the bogie innards very well.... The kit provides some lovely front axle bearing castings to help with the tightness of space behind the slide bars. All in all a very enjoyable build so far. This kit is for an` experienced` modeller.... now there`s a funny thing. `Experience` well you can be a modeller of 40 years plus and have achieved one experience or you can be a modeller of one year and have achieved 40 experiences. I would say that if you feel confident and competent and not scared of soldering then this kit is for you.... Now back to Dave and his Sherton Abbas layout where a Steam Railcar would fit in nicely.... An enjoyable interlude at Sherton last seen by me at ` Telfords End ` while I return to the shed........................
    9 points
  14. Beautiful work as always, and fascinating too. My stables for Bricklayers Arms are nearing completion so my thoughts are turning to hay so your article is very timely and extremely useful. I will be shamelessly copying a few techniques here especially the use of plumbers hemp. Thank you.
    9 points
  15. Beautifully executed and photographed - it is a splendid trigger for the imagination - I can hear those carts rumbling along the roadway! Thank you for the idea about magnetic fencing usually, feature like this are a real pain when cleaning a layout. You make it look very simple but each of those trees is a work of art in its own right. The whole demonstrates that "small is beautiful" Mike
    8 points
  16. I enjoyed it too! There's already a video from the exhibition online, Sherton Abbas is at 30:16 (and Modbury at 6:40).
    8 points
  17. The Sabre was problematic at any height, and in the early days, the Typhoon's airframe also gave many problems - all very stressful for the MAP at the time. The Whirlwind's airframe was built around the Peregrine, which was a much smaller engine than the Merlin - so the Merlin was never an option, they were simply to big and heavy. All the time and effort went into developing the Merlins, so the Peregrine and the Whirlwind both withered on the vine. The Typhoon never made the grade as a fighter, because, quite apart from the problems with the Sabre's reliability, the Typhoon's wing was very thick. Great for strength and housing cannons, but it had a very low Critical Mach Number - a problem many other types of that period suffered from, such as the P38. The similar-looking Tempest had an entirely new, and much thinner wing, and was a much better machine that used the Sabre and the Centaurus. The Tempest was developed into Centaurus-powered the Fury and Sea Fury, both excellent machines, though the Centaurus was also not without it's problems.
    8 points
  18. Apart from a good clean up the external build is now in the bag !
    8 points
  19. I've been experimenting with my home made lighting rig (see my Folgate Street Blog) I made from an old over head projector to see how the lighting effects being planned might work out. I've sprayed on a bit more black to enhance the filthy state of the screen. Painting and cleaning the Screens wasn't too regular in the 20th C and they appeared much filthier prior to 1936 when it was last cleaned and painted. I'm clearly going to have to think something up if I want to create a more mottled, sun beam type effect when the model is completed. I'm thinking of using a layer of white paper over the top with various pinholes and openings here and there. This will all have to wait for now whilst I finish the layout.
    8 points
  20. 8 points
  21. When painting my Edwardian period figures (Andrew Stadden), I initially prime them white, then use enamels to paint them. I always mix up colours (never using anything straight from the tin), and mix up 3 shades of the same colour, a base colour, one a little darker (by adding slightly more of the darkest colour used in the mix) for the shadows, and one a little lighter (by adding a touch of white) for the highlights. I tend to apply paint where it is needed with a very fine brush in the shadows rather than an all over wash, and dry brush the highlights. A few photos of my endeavours follow : I perhaps should add that these are all 2mm scale, so do look somewhat better in the flesh than they do blown up to huge proportions on screen!!! Ian
    8 points
  22. Thanks Miss P. A lot of belpaires there. I prefer a roundtop myself on these. Note the Armstrong smokebox door. Bigger and less dished than the Dean:
    8 points
  23. Haha, thanks everyone, we need a bit of fun in these dark times. The snowboarder certainly isn't me. I do a much better 180 Rewind.
    8 points
  24. Aha, two sheets to the wind, eh? Not sure where Donald Trump has disappeared to, but at least his syrup has been found:
    8 points
  25. Simon these are fascinating blogs! Please keep them coming....
    8 points
  26. Lovely. Gives good depth to the whole scene.
    7 points
  27. I was wondering about that difference in the raves. The one on the tippler has the planks fitted close together, which I don't recall seeing so often. Perhaps for a finer size of coke? Anyway, a search for Bradwell Wood led me to the D299 thread - I should have known that such a good photo wouldn't have escaped that thread. https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/113035-more-pre-grouping-wagons-in-4mm-the-d299-appreciation-thread/&do=findComment&comment=3770771 PS: I also searched for "coke raves", but that led to a whole different ball game! I expect Google will start serving me adverts for Ibiza now.
    7 points
  28. You mentioned nuts. I did a test build of a DD3 tank wagon in 4mm for Taff Vale Models and made one or two additions including nuts on the end of the diagonal braces. I used 16BA nuts. I have attached a picture and leave you to judge their suitability. The diagonal brace is 0.5mm nickel silver rod so the nut slips easily over th end, held with a minute dab of glue. There should be two but my supply of nuts is low so I economised. The second, lock nut, would have been thinner, so just file it down. Unfortunately, 16BA nuts are like hens' teeth at the moment but when they become available again, would someone please let me know??
    7 points
  29. Excellent work Mikkel, the wagons look great and thanks for the link to my 7mm efforts If you want to have a go fading the writing on Slaters wagons with a fibreglass brush, paint the sides with varnish first and allow to dry. The varnish seals the lettering in place, but the fibreglass bristles wear this away very progressively and allow some subtle distressing/fading. Best wishes Dave
    7 points
  30. Julian here from Taff Vale Models. I've been reading this thread with interest. Those kit builds are superb and I look forward to seeing the painted models. I would like to mention that the length of the model from the U9 kit we sell is, as it should be, approximately a scale foot shorter than that of the R2 from the same range and is not a case of "creative" marketing . I also agree that the photo's on the website are not clear, this is something I am slowly addressing across the range within our online shop. Having said that, I feel that the profile error on the existing U9 etch is unacceptable and with that in mind the kit will be withdrawn from sale in its current form. In order to address this in the longer term, I am in the process of drawing up a new version 7mm/ft. kit for this type and may well release a 4mm/ft. version too if there is interest. Just to prove it, here is one of the new coach sides I am working on: I'll be making changes to the chassis design, lamp irons and other details as the kit develops. So I don't hijack this thread, I'll start a new one on this subject once I have something on my workbench. I have had a request for a U10 as well so currently mulling that over. Morgantown Crecent!
    7 points
  31. Stunning modelling and writing as usual Mikkel. A few "pointers" and responses to queries: Horses usually repeat their location for dropping manure: whether it be the same place in a stable, field or even a regular route. Seeing/smelling another horse droppings can sometimes cause a horse to produce, but of course only when it's ready - but that explains the postcard of the mews with the long line. Having the horse "produce" in the mews would be preferable to doing it en-route. You are correct on colour caused by input, and it does darken off quite quickly. Horse manure should not be used on gardens when it's fresh - it needs to age for 6 months or go into compost heaps. Manure has no discernible smell for at least a few days, unless it is mixed with urine. It is also quite a dry product, unlike cows'......... Straw is not popular with gardeners in compost because it doesn't break down very quickly: If straw is used as bedding, "skipping out" will only produce manure - the waxy nature of straw means that it doesn't really absorb anything, and a good yard hand will only remove the muck not the bedding. Some horses eat their bedding (which doesn't do them any good) so they would have a bed of wood shavings (in those days) or nowadays chopped flax stems or linseed stems. These beds are very absorbent and skipping out produces some very wet caustic product, that smells and rots everything. As Mikkel has beautifully modelled, a good stables has a drain system for removal of liquids. If left (or absorbed into absorbant bedding), that is what makes stables smell, attracts flies and can be the start point for equine diseases.
    7 points
  32. Aha! What's brown and sounds like a bell? Dung!
    7 points
  33. Today's purchases. My wife doesn't wear tights but these were just £3. If the white pepper doesn't work it goes on the food The Pendon Paper also arrived, and it occurs to me that seeing these light groundcovers in past magazine articles about Pendon may have influenced my preference for very light yards. Note also the stable block!
    7 points
  34. A lot of careful brass bending and patient soldering to be done with this project. The body needs a lot of concentration to keep everything level and square. There is a novel way of using extra internal section dividers with longer tabs that protrude through the chassis to keep the roof in place. But it all seems to provide a removable roof for later internal detailing. ......and I made the sliding doors and windows fully functional. There has been a lot of work to get the prototypical steam motor bogie attachment mechanics to work properly .... but she`s now a mover...
    7 points
  35. Thanks Mike, Spent a few days on the trailing `fish belly` bogie which is quite a kit in itself...... Having assembled the basic bogie chassis I spent time piecing together all the brake rigging and white metal brake blocks and after a struggle trying to get it all in place decided that there was far too much risk of electrical shorting between the brake blocks and wheels....far too risky for an impending DCC sound set up. Also, I needed as much space as possible for unobtrusive wiper pickups so without all the brake rigging is going to be much easier. At any rate the bogie is now completed, so on to the basic body build........
    7 points
  36. Just a few pics showing how the wire roof was constructed for anyone interested. These roof structure may look very complicated but they are relatively easy to make once you break it all down into its respective components etc. As a builder, I've a bit of understanding of how they are constructed in real life - this knowledge has helped enormously. The bundles of wire are seperated into seperate strands. These are then G clamped to either end of a furniture clamp - the clamp is turned in reverse to stretch the wire straight and introduce a little tension. I've already ruined one furniture clamp (on previous schemes) as they are obviously not designed to work in reverse. It took about 230 x 3ft lengths of wire to make this structure and a lot was used up by the circular Truss design. I studied a lot of pictures of the prototype and carefully drew out the Truss design onto a piece of plaster board. This holds the wire firmly in place during soldering. For such a large 3ft by 3ft structure I needed 78 of these. Soldering them all up in the same jig ensures repitition. The circles were easy to make by using a broom handle. This was for the smaller outer circles - the big central one was made by using an old postal tube in a similar fashion. The six beams were the next job. They required two sides a piece - this differs from the prototype in as much as the bottom plate is a single 2 inch thick piece of flat steel. I had to double up because they would been far too wobbly to work with and they needed to be as ridgid as possible. The next job was to tie the structure together. An exact plan of the roof was drawn out onto a piece of flat ply and the beams placed precisely into the positions determined by the walls. The Trusses were soldered together - note how they line up with the beam positions. The trusses were then soldered to the beams. I used a Dremel to cut the top of the beams and slid the trusses down into place. Once everything was throughly washed down it was onto the cardboard ridge and valley sections. Note how the metal bars used to join the trusses have been covered over with card spacers. These were cut to the same pattern and they nicely hide the join. Once I was happy, the whole thing was sprayed Matt Black from rattle cans. Unfortunately, no matter how accurate you try to be you will always get deviation from perfect true so there has been a lot of McGuyvering since - cutting out a wire here and cutting or adding cardboard there etc. The test photographs have helped me identify areas where things look a little lumpy etc - still a bit of fiddling to go yet.
    7 points
  37. AKA 'Pouncing', although strictly speaking a proper pounce is made from a piece of oiled card which is then perforated with a needle to give a dotted outline. The card is then patted with a muslin bag filled with French Chalk which goes through the holes. When I was doing it, I just printed the design onto 80 gsm paper & chalked the back to transfer it rather as Mr Baker has done at Quorn. As to historical examples... There are plenty of examples showing a guide lines - top only if you're using the plank edge as a bottom guide - but very few showing anything else. I did turf up these though:— March 1938: This looks as though the G W and 12T have been pounced, & maybe the number too (that 8 is very nice & both the 5s are suspiciously similar):— August 1948: Not sure about this one - the 'dotted box' is something I've not seen elsewhere & the general wonkiness suggests freehand:— June 1958: Plenty of chalk lines here, & a suspicion of sketching out on the number - sort of a halfway house between pouncing/tracing & freehand:—
    7 points
  38. Thanks Dave. Yes, all this business with sheets/tarps is tricky stuff to model, and quite time consuming too I find. You finish a wagon and think you're done. But then there's the couplings. And the weighting. And the load. And the tarp. And the ties/ropes. And that's just simple stuff like mine! Rest assured BTW. No blondes were harmed in the making of these models Hi Mike. Your horse-drawn Q1 was the first I saw in GWR red, I have often admired it. I think most people build the Q1 kit with the V-hanger in the central position, since there is no mention of anything else in the instructions. The sewing thread used for the wagons was in fact "stolen" from my wife's collection. I eventually decided to come clean, and she duly gave me the whole thing saying she never used that roll. So much for all my stealth I should probably have gone for darker thread though. I did paint and weather it, but you can't really tell in the photos. Many thanks Chris. Your stables look fantastic! There must have been hundreds of stalls in there. And storage at the upper level, it seems. Very classy. Incidentally, one might say that hay and straw is all very well, but what about the sacks of feed? I had a close look at a 1906 photo of the provender store at Didcot. Below is a crop. It suggests to me that sacks were loaded at the bottom of wagons, then covered with hay and straw. So the wagons we see in photos may well be full of unseen sacks!
    7 points
  39. Thanks everyone for your kind comments and buttons on a dull day (gone down with the flu - no not that one, but tomorrow was my week off, typical!). This little layout has seen a good deal of use already but it's good to have it finished. I think in visual terms the extra depth does add value, although it doesn't substitute for length. It certainly would benefit from extra modules either side. Dining table here we come Yes Grahame, those are do-dahs. Pigment lumps in PVA again.
    6 points
  40. Been making buffers for the locos this weekend. Starting with short lengths of 4mm Square section brass rod cut to about 8mm fitted in the 4 jaw self centring chuck then milled the base to 1.5mm. This is a watch makers mill for making pivots and spigots. They come in .1mm sizes from .4mm to 2.4mm or at least they're the sizes I have although I have lost the 1.1.mm. Just run over the section all done in 10 seconds. 4 jaw chuck off. Buffer turned round now mounted in a 1.5mm collet and first part off the excess. Excess cut off Find the centre with a 2mm ball bur this will give me a good start later. Now I have turned down the shank. Next drill out the centre to fit the buffer head I drill only as deep as the base of the buffer. Now change drill for a .6mm and drill the rest of the way through the shank it has a bit of spit on the drill to prevent the drill sticking and snapping. Buffers ready for the bolt holes to be put in.
    6 points
  41. Eric "Winkle" Brown's favourite From Wikipaedia As regards his preferences Brown states: My favourite in the piston engine (era) is the de Havilland Hornet. For the simple reason it was over-powered. This is an unusual feature in an aircraft, you could do anything on one engine, almost, that you could do on two. It was a 'hot rod Mosquito' really, I always described it as like flying a Ferrari in the sky.
    6 points
  42. I remember building a 1/72 version of that almost 60 years ago - not to that standard, though!
    6 points
  43. Euphemism: it used to be "spending a penny"... for horses, only a Farthing. Kit PW
    6 points
  44. Superb modeling Mikkel. Detailed research, accurate observation and clever implementation. The end result looks spot on, that really does add to the look of a working stables.
    6 points
  45. Just "dropping" in to say, in best football manager style, "the boy dung good"!
    6 points
  46. I'll bite. For what it's worth, I agree with you. Making a decent 3D print of anything complex takes a great deal of skill, both with the CAD side of things, and in knowing how to exploit the printer. A different set of skills to those required to scratch build, certainly, but skills all the same. Adrian
    6 points
  47. Sigh; you've done it again Mike. Absolutely brilliant!
    6 points
  48. Not much involving cheese got past Parmley, he later left the railway to co-found Appleby Creamery when the Express dairy shut. Not a circus train but I have got most of the vehicles together for the Last Farm Move on BR, from Gloucestershire to Wigtownshire in 1962. A pedigree beef herd needs a lot of Beetles...
    6 points
  49. One Saturday afternoon at Appleby in the 1990s, whilst clearing up after the day's various steam and deisel excursions, I found a carrier bag with a large full Wensleydale cheese in it, obviously left by one of the throng of tourists who had decamped from one of them for a couple of hours in town. Stationmaster and ex-cheesemaker Parmley (well, Railman, but it was definitely his station) was consulted, who recognised it and and believed that it belonged to a lady now heading back towards London via the WCML. He then produced a cheese corer from his pocket (!), sampled it and declared it to be excellent. The Passenger Information Manual was consulted which confirmed that perishable lost property could be disposed of by whatever means were locally expedient. It took us two days to eat it. The cameo is excellent, I have a couple of Airfix WW1 tommies somewhere relaxing on the back of a coal merchant's lorry.
    6 points
  50. You need this: (From Wickes website!)
    6 points
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