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  1. Projects over the summer have included trees. The original inspiration came from the tree-lined perimeters of Reading’s Vastern Road and King’s Meadow goods yards. Vastern Road yard, Reading, 1948. Source: Britain from above. The trees here were quite close to the track along some sections. Earlier photos from the 1900s show larger trees, so they must have been a feature from at least the 1880s. Vastern Road yard, Reading, 1948. Source: Britain from above. Apart from a bit of dabbling ages ago, this was my first real attempt at trees. It does show! But for what it's worth, here's a summary of how I did them. The basic armature was made from Treemendus 0.5 mm wire, cut to 150 mm lengths of which I used 45 per tree for my purposes. Similar wire can be obtained from florists. To form the trees, I used the method suggested by Treemendus, whereby one wire is twisted around others (rather than twisting all wires). This is certainly a quick method, but the outer wire does show. Treemendus recommend using masking tape in order to smooth out the trunk and main branches. This helps, but also adds to the thickness. Accordingly, I may use fewer wires per tree for the next batch. Once done, the armatures were coated in Treemendus bark powder. This can be sanded for a smoother look. For the crown and foliage I diverted from the Treemendus approach and instead used Heki sea foam, each piece glued to the armature with superglue. The pods can be removed, but I didn’t bother as the foliage I used conceals it. The crown was sprayed with a few quick coats of light brown/grey. I used Liquitex, these are low-toxic water based spraypaint for artists. Foliage was added using “coarse turf” from Woodlands scenic. This is the “burnt grass” shade. The foliage was attached using Hob-e-Tac- glue, non-toxic and very sticky. The foliage sticks to the outer reaches of the seafoam, leaving a nice natural branch structure behind it. A coat of Woodlands “scenic cement” was sprayed on to further stick things down. This darkens the foliage somewhat, so I only did one coat. As these are planted urban trees, they needed to be fairly uniform yet individually different. It helped to build them alongside each other. I found that it was possible to make up individual bits of sea-foam twigs and retro-fit them to the trees. That way, any areas that I was unhappy with could be improved. The species is nominally London Plane-ish, although I admittedly concentrated more on just learning the techniques. I did try to indicate the mottled/patchy look of the bark with a paintbrush, but it doesn't show up well and needs more work. The original plan was to have 3-4 trees at the front of the layout. I liked the views beneath the canopy. And the shadow effect when the sun came in through our windows. But from a distance the layout seemed too “front loaded” and forbidding. Trying out various configurations I was struck by how the different positioning of trees can give very different impressions. E.g., compare these two photos: In the end I opted for the arrangement seen below. This gives me street trees but also an open view. It requires an extension of the layout at the back, featuring another road and - you'll be relieved to hear - a backscene. This is currently being built. It's all been an interesting exercise. I will probably keep this first batch of trees for the time being, but have started experimenting with alternative methods, including natural plants. More on that later.
    49 points
  2. I have been making slow but steady progress. When I started I knew that it would take most of the summer, so I’m happy just pottering on with it all, learning as I go along. A few details. This is the luggage rack assembly, with the mirrored compartment wall. The brackets were a very fancy design, I have simplified them as they are less than 4 mm long. Not difficult in itself, but I have 64 of them to make. Seating is provided in the kit but it is basic and needs a bit of extra work. These are the first class seats. The silhouette cut the armrests and the wings, both trimmed in lace. How many antimacassers? Well, 78 of them. An internal view. The D96 is a nine compartment third. This photo was taken in dark conditions, I wanted to see how the level of lighting looked in practice. As I have mentioned in the past painting and lining is not my strong point. I gave a couple of sides a coat of rattle can, then left them for a few days to really dry. It is “Vauxhall Burgundy Red”. Now experts would tell me that I should be using an airbrush to spray a more accurate shade but there are limitations to what I can do in a flat. I really wasn’t happy about the idea of painting all those panels. Hmm, so I decided to have a go at making lined transfers on white transfer paper. Design was not difficult, but repetitive. I had some “Crafty” brand paper, first print, awful. Ink smeared all over. Second print, worse. So I learned that transfer paper degrades over time. New white transfer paper ordered, “Mister decal paper” brand. Printed well, transfers made and applied to a paint test card. Not bad but I still felt that the white part had too much of a pink tinge from the coach purple underneath. The answer would be to paint the panel white before applying the transfer, but that was what I was trying to avoid. I sat and had a think, what if I just put an identical transfer over the first? I tried it and it worked perfectly, nice white panel with the line round it showing up well. So here is a D 94 composite side as a first example. I am quite pleased with that. I wouldn’t claim that it is as fine as that produced by an expert painter with considerable skill with a lining pen. However I am not one and this method looks the part from normal viewing distances. It is also very fault tolerant. Make a mistake cutting round the transfer, bin it, next one. Realise that a panel is a bit squint, drop of water, adjust it. Having got the techniques sorted out I can push on and do the rest, still a fair amount to do though.
    25 points
  3. I've not made an etched kit for a long time, so what better excuse to dust off the RSU than to put together one of Stephen Harris' kit for the 13T All Steel High. http://www.2mm.org.uk/small_suppliers/stephenharris/index.htm The etched contains everything except; vacuum cylinder, wheel sets, axle boxes and buffers. An interesting process is making the chain link dimples in the side of some wagon diagrams. This involves a 1mm punch and a sandwich of etched jigs, very well though out. Transfers are from fox and the base paint was Tamiya acrylics. This was then sealed in with matt varnish. The weather was built up in layers using various paints and the majority is done with brush work.
    23 points
  4. This cottage in Parkend is, I believe, known these days as 'The Nook'. Certainly this is the name given to it by John Stretton in 'The Dean Forest Railway, a Past & Present Companion', Volume 2 (Silver Link Publishing). This cottage, plus the house to it's left (the former Police House and Police Station for Parkend and currently known as 'Hazledene') are very close to the end of the Marsh branch at Parkend, which is the subject of Re6/6's current P4 project - However, for the purposes of this blog and all subsequent entries, I will be referring to it as 'The Other House'. Both cottages are required for John's layout, although the Police House will need to be cut down slightly, to fit with the backscene and the rear edge of the layout. I agreed to build both cottages for John and am hoping to get them finished in time for the 'mini-Scaleforum local show for local people' type event that is taking place at our Area Group's (aka 'D.R.A.G.') normal venue near Teignmouth on the Saturday of what would have been the Scaleforum weekend (25th September coming). There aren't a whole lot of published photos of either cottage, although the Police House does admittedly feature in rather more photos than 'The Other House'. We know that the Police House had a rendered cement-coloured finish for much of it's life (and certainly during the period that the layout is set in). Apart from modern Google-type photos of The Other House, there is hardly anything published. What would have been a good view in the above John Stretton book, taken in the 1960s, is mostly hidden by a rather inconsiderate pannier tank. As such, the best we can do is to decide that The Other House was built of local stone, in a style that more or less matches other stone dwellings further up the Marsh branch, opposite The Fountain Inn, including the famous 'half house' that does feature in a number of contemporary photos. I was then given a free hand to decide on the exact materials to use and the colour scheme. Being a fan of the Scalescenes range of downloadable printed brick papers and building kits, I decided to use their 'TX48' sheet 'Squared Rubble' for The Other House - https://scalescenes.com/product/tx48-squared-rubble/ The first thing was to produce a scale drawing to 4mm scale. As this was started when pandemic restrictions were still in place, the dimensions had to be estimated from what photographic evidence was to hand. A drawing was produced and a few copies taken. One of the copies was used to cut out the main wall elevations and lightly tape to a piece of Dalerboard (stout card, coloured on one side and 1.5mm thick): A 4mm 'plinth' was left, so that the building could be slightly sunk into the ground. The outline of the elevations and the window and door apertures were then carefully drawn around with a sharp pencil: The five wall sections (including the end wall of the 'lean to' were then cut out. At this point, I forgot to take any photos for a while. I had the stone paper printed off by a local printer on his fancy laser jet, not trusting my aged ink jet to produce the kind of quality I was looking for. The stone paper was then cut approximately to size and glued to the respective Dalerboard components and the resulting wall sections placed together for a photo: The stone paper is overlapping at the corners and would be carefully trimmed back and coloured with a soft pencil, once the wall sections were glued together. Next was to fit windows and doors. We had planned to use York Modelmaking products, but we couldn't find anything that matched the necessary window and door dimensions, so I made up window frames and sash units in the same way that I have for the Callow Lane cottages, namely individual strips of painted plasticard, which are glued in place behind the window openings and individual sash sections, with the glazing bars applied using a Bob Moore lining pen and enamel paints. Some flat sections of plastic strip were primed and sprayed with a dark green: A front door and also a side door to the 'lean to' were made up from plasticard: In reality, the 'lean to' of 'The Nook' these days appears to function as a garage, with an entrance slightly lower than the front door, but for the sake of a quiet life, I have kept everything on the same level and assumed that in the 1950s and 1960s, the 'lean to' was simply a store of some kind. Window frames and front door in place: Sash window sections being prepared: Windows and doors now glued in place. Front wall is still not attached to the rest of the building at this time, to aid fitting the windows and doors: Now it's all glued together: Next, a 'false roof' was glued between the various wall sections. At 1.5mm thick, Dalerboard is really too thick to stand proud of the walls: Top roof sections were then cut out of much thinner card ('postcard' thickness) and parallel lines drawn on, 5mm apart: Scalescenes individual slate strips (from one of their terraced cottages kits, which I already had) were cut out, the edges coloured with a grey felt tip pen and glued in place, using Prittstick, one at a time. When each roof section had all it's slate strips in place, they were placed between two sheets of clean paper and left overnight under a pile of heavy Ian Allen railway photo albums (other publishers will also do): The finished roof sections are then turned upside down and the slate strips trimmed very carefully along the edges, using a very sharp scalpel and are then glued to the 'false roof' sections using Evostick Impact adhesive: Guttering was made up from Wills half down pipes (finer section than their actual guttering) and spigots of 0.5mm brass rod epoxied in place. Also chimney pots were made up from Wills components and left overnight to harden off: Down pipes were then made up from 0.8mm brass rod, with fuse wire wrapped around in a couple of places and soldered on. This and the guttering was sprayed the same green and holes drilled in the Dalerboard to match the spacing of the respective spigots and the whole lot then epoxied in place: At this stage, I popped over to John's and posed the cottage in it's planned location on the layout: John then posed some of the resin walling that he's going to use, in front of the cottage: I then took the cottage back home to finish the roof flashing. The building then had the windows and the front door blanked off and the whole thing was given a light waft-over with Humbrol Matt Acrylic varnish, to take the printer's sheen off the stone paper. I then posed the building for some arty shots in the garden: It's just about done now, a little light weathering with some powders will be done in due course, particularly around the chimneys, but it's now time to think about making a start on the Police House.
    23 points
  5. Not much active modelling recently, but i took advantage of the good weather to take a section of the layout into the back garden and pose a couple of trains. First up, we see the part completed Rebuilt Royal Scot, 46109, having arrived with a returning Wakes Week holiday excursion. Then a more prototypical push-pull train, hauled/propelled by BR Standard Class 2 tank, 84012. Dave.
    22 points
  6. It must be about twenty years since Hornby released their improved West Country/Battle of Britain pacifics, supplanting the old triang-era model. I've got four of these nice models, mostly acquired with little thought to region/period suitability. It was only when I started work on Stourpayne Marshall that I started taking a closer look at what I had, and how they might fit in with the S&D theme. Back in October, with the help of some friendly commenters, I came up with this non-exhaustive list of original condition Bulleid light pacifics as seen on the S&D prior to closure: 4109 Trafford Leigh Mallory 34040 Crewkerne 34041 Wilton 34042 Dorchester 34043 Combe Martin 34093 Saunton 34037 Clovelly 34044 Woolacomb 34095 Brentor 34107 Blandford Forum 34110 66 Squadron 34108 Wincanton 34102 Lapford 34103 Calstock 34067 Tangmere 34079 141 Squadron 34051 Winston Churchill 34105 Swanage and just before closure: 34006 Bude 34057 Biggin Hill My models in BR condition were Tangmere, and two Blandford Forums. Tangmere can stay as it is - it wasn't a "regular" on the S&D but it did traverse those hallowed metals at least once, so it gets a pass. Blandford of course suits the line even more so by dint of its name, but what to do with the two models? Ending up with two was an oversight. I'd bought and weathered my own example, then several years later, for some reason, I forgot that I had it and bought one of Lord & Butler's very fine pre-weathered models. Unfortunately the optons for renumbering Blandford were a bit limited, requiring it to be wide-cab loco with a cut-down tender. Calstock and Lapford were identified as suitable candidates, but there's a bit of a snag with the body. Those Hornby models. like Blandford or Tangmere, that have a town crest or RAF plaque, have it attached via a plastic moulding which plugs into a hole in the bodyside. Lapford and Calstock have just the name, so one is left with the problem of dealing with that hole in the side. I believe Hornby did take care of this with some of their other releases, which had a modified tooling, but I had to work with the models in my possession. One of the Blandfords would need its nameplate and plaque removed, and the safest best seemed to work with the one I'd worked on, as the weathering was much lighter than on the Lord & Butler example. The plastic mouldings were easily prised-away with the edge of a knife, leaving two holes where the nameplate clipped in, and another for the plaque. I'd ordered some Fox plates (having opted for Calstock) and the etched plate easily fitted over the two holes, meaning they could be left untreated. The small hole for the plaque posed a more serious problem. I couldn't see any plausible way to use conventional filling and sanding methods without losing both the rivet detail and having to repaint some or all of the body. I didn't fancy that at all! So I opted for a pragmatic approach, aiming to minimise the visual effect of the hole without concealing it completely. The first job was to drip glue-n-glaze into the hole until it filled the cavity, leaving a clear plug. This already looked better. Once I'd added two layers of glue-n-glaze, I then retouched the hole with Railmatch BR green. I felt that this reduced the visual impact of the hole from normal viewing: I felt that this worked well enough that I was happy to continue with the work on transforming Blandford Forum into Calstock. The cab numbers were removed with T-cut, a cotton bud, followed by gentle abrasion with a cocktail stick. I added replacement numbers from the Fox range. The etched plates came with a smokebox number. No other changes were necessary. I must say that these Fox plates are splendid, and the red really pops. It lifts the somewhat drab BR green quite nicely, I feel. As for the other Blandford, I've still to add the detailing parts, as well as a decoder, but the excellent L&B weathering should be apparent below: Look at the subtle work around the rivets, and the pale staining between the nameplate and firebox. I find a lot of commercial weathering to be a bit meh, but Adrian seems to get a lot of tonal variety into his models, without obliterating the underlying colours. It's an effect I struggle to achieve when I do my own weathering, so I'm all the more impressed and willing to spend a little more for the quality of the work. I still think this model will benefit from some etched plates, though. Next in the renumbering queue will be a pair of rebuilt pacifics - but that's another story. Thanks for reading!
    16 points
  7. I was rather late getting back into the swing of modelling this year. The trouble was indecision over how to proceed, which brought everything to a grinding halt early on. While I was happy with the track design and operation of the layout, the overall appearance was a disappointment. The minimal scenery idea with which I was trying to speed up construction, by ignoring anything outside the boundary fence, hadn't really come up to expectations. I still liked the idea in principle, but I don't think it worked too well with the arrangement I had here. However the main gripe was the straggling nature of the beast. I guess I'm a small-layout man at heart, and I found these long sprawling scenes just didn't sit comfortably with me. So what to do? Carry on as normal and hope for the best, or think up some other way of continuing? By May I was getting frustrated at the impasse and lack of modelling. Finally I threw up my hands and decided to just leave this area of the layout to stew in its own juices for now. Instead I moved downdale to the Castleport end of the system, starting afresh on a couple of new modules, and back into my comfort zone by building them in a more conventional fish tank style. I started with a couple of box frames, constructed using the method described in an earlier post. They each measure 23x10x10 inches. The end of June saw them in the state shown below, with lighting and sky backgrounds added. The left hand scene represents an industrial branch serving the coal wharf and dockland. The track at the rear will be hidden behind buildings, just leaving the track along the waterfront visible. The odd looking structure seen at the left is the start of a concrete bunker for the coal wharf. The right hand scene is the Castleport station and town area, with part of a waterside mill in place. During July and August work concentrated on the Castleport scene, which is now almost finished and shown in the images below. Some buildings were re-used from the old Castleport, but there was not enough space here to fit in all the original town buildings. The station is quite an elaborate affair for Tweedale. The original inspiration was St Aubyn on the Jersey Railway, but then a local chap came along offering a cheap rate on some fancy 'art doily' fretwork for the train shed and I couldn't resist. I think his enthusiasm waned somewhat when he realised how quickly he was getting through jig saw blades, but like the fellow on the telly, he felt that having started he was obliged to finish. In the end you get what you pay for, and the general feeling among the Tweedalers is that at least this monument to bad taste is unlikely to withstand the onslaught of smoke, steam and salt-laden river damps for long. The mill at the other end of the scene was cobbled together from bits of the original. I'm not entirely happy with the part at the back, which will probably get reconfigured later. Road access is through the ancient town wall, what's left of it. The local authorities have insisted on crossing gates being installed here after a councillor got a horrible fright when he came dashing through the arch on his bicycle and found the morning goods bearing down on him. The railway company are still dragging their feet on the issue while they try to work out how to squeeze the gates into the restricted space. On the whole I'm pleased with the way the scene has come together. I'll finish the adjoining module next, then assess whether to continue the rest of the layout in this style. The supporting substructure on the main section of the layout would need extending before I could connect this pair of modules to the rest. Until then they will probably sit on a shelf as static dioramas for storing spare stock, but at least they served their purpose of freeing up the modelling deadlock. Cheers Alan
    14 points
  8. Below are some of the improvements I have attempted on the Lima LMS GUV/CCT. The coach was a chance find item in a chance find model shop on a day trip to Gravesend. The model was in "as new" condition before an inital brake fluid bath to remove the paint. The fluid did not manage to shift everything but as I intended to file and sand away alot of tge beading detail I felt removol of the lettering and numbers would be enough. Detail was scraped away with a brand new chisel blade. Preaching to the converted I know, but a sharp chisel blade must be used for good results but more importantly to avoid injury! I removed alot of the beading to match a vehicle photograph by Paul Bartlett in 1968 https://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/lmsparcels/h157ec466 Additional beading was added to match the photo. All the chisselling and sanded was made harder by detail I wanted to keep like hinges and doors bumpers. I decided to just go for it and replace later with door furniture made of comet brass hinges I had in the stores, brass .45 wire for door bumpers and .33 wire for hand grabs and handles. Lanarkshire buffers, hooks and torpedo vents were also added. At this stage the the chasis was untouched and I looked around for ideas on how this could be improved. I came across a thread by @brossardabout the upgrade of this coach and decided to essentially copy his method. The most obvious fault with the lima model are the bogies, using BR1 type bogies, not the LMS 9ft bogies. Bogies are in the process of being built and I have opted for the comet welded type as there is a picture of a vehicle fromt he same lot as mine with the welded type. I have never scratchbuilt anything in brass so decided to tool up with a piercing saw and .41mm brass sheet to build the truss work underneath. The reason for the amount of work is that the battery box side is a little crude and the trussing is more exposed on the real thing. LMS v hangers, dynamo, vac cylinders, lighting regulator and battery box were used from the comet range. I mounted the vac cyinders so they hang too low but at this stage I felt the butchery required to correct them would be too much. The truss work is cut with a piercing saw and made use, like @brossard of the tatlow book on NPCS vehicles. The side trusses were made with 1mm brass L angle and .41mm brass sheet cut witht he saw. I hope so far that this account shows how modellers influence and inspire the work of others. I have done nothing original here but have enjoyed my first efforts using brass to scratch build with. I hope to get further along with the project this weekend!
    11 points
  9. As I commented to @Mikkel, following my previous post on this project, this bit of modelling was a spur-of-the-moment idea after a fallow period when I was lacking imagination. It was triggered by a post on @Annie’s thread about modelling one of the B&ER 4-4-0ST engines but now I’m not sure whether this is the prototype I want to model. While thinking about the possibilities, I came across an appraisal of Broad Gauge 4-4-0ST engines in an early issue of the Broad Gauge Society magazine ‘Broadsheet’ [No.17, Spring 1987]. The ‘Broadsheet’ article pointed out that there were 96 of these engines, all derived from a design by Gooch, originally created to meet an urgent operational requirement on the South Devon Railway, following failure of the atmospheric system. The first two engines, built in 1849 set a pattern for all these engines, in that the leading bogies swivelled on a ball-and-socket joint attached to the bottom of the boiler. The boiler provided the only structural link between the cylinders and the main frames, which terminated at the leading coupled wheels, although some later versions had full-length frames. In order to help modellers, the article divided the engines into four main groups, as follows: 1. GWR and SDR ‘Short-tank’ Engines : together with the first two by Gooch, there were 27 engines in this category, from many different builders. These engines remained substantially as built throughout their working lives, except for the addition of weatherboards, modified front foot-plating and, it is believed, circular smokebox doors. SDR ‘Aurora’ 2. SDR ‘Long-tank’ Engines : there were 16 engines, widely known as the ‘Hawk’ class, which were initially hired by the SDR from contractors. In 1866, the SDR purchased all these engines and ordered 6 more from the Avonside Engine Co. These later engines had full-length plate frames. A further 4 engines were built in 1872 and 1875, designed to be convertible to standard gauge, although this was never carried out. Two of these engines actually outlived the Broad Gauge, when they were used to shunt BG stock at the Swindon ‘dump’ until 1893 SDR ‘Hawk’ 3. Bristol & Exeter Engines : There were 26 engines in this group, generally more standardised than the SDR engines. Although attributed to James Pearson, the engines followed the Gooch design quite closely but with full-length main frames and a very long (9’ 2”) coupled wheelbase. Access to the footplate on all except the first six was over the top of the rear driving wheels, by means of a metal step-ladder. B&ER No.71 4. Oddments : The Carmarthen & Cardigan Railway hired 2 engines of this type, which were all eventually sold to the SDR. The C&CR also had two side-tank 4-4-0 engines which were converted to saddle tanks after sale to the SDR. One 4-4-0ST was built for the Llynvi Valley Railway by Slaughter, Gruning & Co., sold to the SDR in 1868, and converted into a six-coupled machine in 1874. The Vale of Neath Railway operated 9 short-tanked locos, very like the 'Corsair/Comet' types, but with neater, straight-bottomed tanks. After considering this ‘Broadsheet’ article in some detail, I moved away from the B&ER engines. There are potential difficulties in modelling the step-ladders, which have to clear the outside crank-pins while, at the same time, the valances of the splashers have to clear inside the coupling rods. Taken together, these present a major challenge to clearances in 4 mm scale. Apart from that significant factor, I also dislike the appearance of these engines with their cramped sheet-iron cabs (although these were later removed by the GWR) On the other hand, I was drawn to the shapely curved sides of the bunker on some of the SDR engines, although some others had straight tops. So, after much deliberation, I decided to have a go at modelling ‘Aurora’ from the SDR ‘Short-tank’ group, precisely because it has so many interesting shapes to challenge my 3D-modelling ability! The main dimensions, as listed in the RCTS booklet were : ‘Aurora’, built Jan 1852 by Longridge & Co, Bedlington wheelbase 17’ 9” (5’ + 5’ 1” + 7’ 8”) coupled wheels 5’ 9” dia bogie wheels 3’ 6” dia boiler barrel 10’ 6” x 4’ 5” dia firebox casing 5’ x 5’ 3” height 14’ 9” boiler pitch 6’ 8” I used the same method that I described in my previous post to extrude the saddle tank from a drawing – this time a pencil sketch by F.J.Roche, reproduced in the ‘Broadsheet article. This drawing was useful for the front elevation but I feel the drawing in Mike Sharman’s compilation by the Oakwood Press is more dependable for the side elevation. I imported the drawing into ‘Fusion 360’ as a ‘canvas’ and then extruded the length of the ‘short-tank’. I added the downward extensions in the central part of the tank by extruding rectangles and then used the ‘fillet’ tool to produce the rounded corners, as visible on the prototype photo above. ‘Aurora’ short-tank extrusion I was especially pleased with the cut-outs since John Brewer, the author of the ‘Broadsheet’ article, commented that: “These earlier engines had short saddle tanks. leaving the firebox uncovered. Most had odd and asymmetrical cut-outs in the lower edges of the tanks, which might almost have been purposely designed to thwart the modeller.” Fortunately, the convenient features of 3D-modelling software came to my rescue! Interestingly, the Longridge-built engines were taken by truck to Gloucester and tried out on the Cheltenham line, so they did fall loosely within the orbit of some of my other BG models, also based in Gloucester. In his article, John Brewer wrote quite a lot about the difficulties to be faced by modellers of the time (1987) in attempting to create one of these engines. Reading his comments made me sincerely grateful for the advances in technology that have provided me with a 3D-printer! John also used an expression regarding these engines that I had to look up: he referred to their 'jolie-laide' character which so endeared these machines to the author. Now that I know what it means, I have to agree I shall continue to construct my model along the lines described in my previous post – assembling the 3D-printed components around a brass tube representing the boiler. I hope to show more progress before too long. Mike
    9 points
  10. Having been inspired by a recent post by @Annie, I’m having a go at creating a 3D-print of one of those ‘ugly-duckling’ 4-4-0STs, much liked in the West Country as very successful engines. As usual, I’m applying ‘quick and dirty’ methods, to create as much as possible by extruding ‘bodies’ from existing drawings – in this case those by Ian Beattie, reproduced in the Broad Gauge Society magazine ‘Broadsheet No.73’ I imported the front-elevation drawing as a ‘canvas’ into ‘Fusion 360’ and used its drawing tools to trace around the outlines of the smokebox and the tanks. I extruded the area of the smokebox to form a 3-dimensional ‘body’ and repeated the same process for the tanks. My intention was to fit these two parts around a brass tube, which will form the engine’s boiler. Initial sketch drawn over imported ‘canvas’ Smokebox extruded from initial sketch Tank also produced by the same method My next step was to import the drawing of the side elevation and use it to extrude the frames and splashers, as shown below. Frames extruded from sketch over imported ‘canvas’ Now I had three virtual components to pass to the 3D printer. I used ‘Cura’ software to generate the printer files and this software also creates any necessary support structures. The following screen shot shows the infill that reinforces the internal structure of the tanks: Cross-section of Tank in ‘Cura’ print pre-view Note the information, on the above screen-shot, that the Tank structure takes 1h 29m to print and has a filament cost of about £0.13. The other components took under 30 min each to print. After printing the three components, I stacked them together, to show how the final assembly could look: Loose assembly of 3D-printed components The tank and smokebox printed well but the frames are a little too thin, with very fragile axlebox horns, so I shall strengthen these areas. Because the individual components print quickly, it is easy to make modification on the basis of the trial prints. The brass tube forming the boiler is just visible below the forward part of the tank in the above photo. This part of the assembly is shown more clearly below: Tank and Smokebox slid over Brass Tube I think these steps demonstrate the feasibility of designing a locomotive around parts which are simple extrusions from published drawings. At present, I am trying out my ideas on various locomotive types that I find of interest. Many of my previous models have been based around the South Wales line from Gloucester and I note that four of these 4-4-0ST engines were operated by the short-lived Carmarthen and Cardigan Railway before being sold to the South Devon and Cornwall railways. This allocation to South Wales could be used to justify this type being found together with my other models. Mike
    8 points
  11. As a relief from the brick-work, I have been churning out loads for wagons and lorries over the last week. As a confirmed tea-drinker, I had to have pallets of tea-chests, inspired by @Mikkel 's (if nowhere near as good), so I sawed, trimmed, and edged in silver some wood strip. A delivery awaits collection and complete unloading from the VBB: A load of timber planking is put on a wagon for its customer from the lorry, with the unorthodox aid of the Freightlifter, the product of the plantations on the High Weald: I have been playing around with tissue paper, trying to get a tarpaulin to 'drape' nicely. This looks as if made from Barbour coat cloth (the day-light bulb is flattering) - I will try weathering it later with a grey tone - but I was pleased with the appearance. The gang take a tea-break from loading wool bales, having completed and sheeted an OBA, before putting the remainder on the OCA behind it. I obtained a lump of genuine Lewes chalk, to my delight, when pottering round Southerham on a visit a few months ago. This has been crushed and sieved, and made into loads for lorry and wagon, and a (unconvincing, I admit) pile for the J.C.B. to load. A '56' makes a rare visit to take the minerals away. Finally, after collecting four pallets of widgets, the engineering firm's delivery driver does a little 'private business' with his brother-in-law, taking a package back on the lorry to drop off at home en route... Lots more to do to the model, of course, but I am glad still to be making some sort of progress.
    6 points
  12. This 1958 vintage Hudswell was acquired from the National Coal Board's Nottinghamshire area. It was never intended to be used at Strong's yard as the Gardner 8L3 engine had been sold to Hong Kong, for use in a junk, before the locomotive was off the low-loader. Fortunately, the deal fell through and the locomotive went on to spend a couple of years as a yard shunter, before it was finally cut up.
    6 points
  13. If my last post was about ‘making choices’, the subject of this one is definitely ‘rivets’. These earlier engines seem to have been covered in the things so, thank goodness, 3D-printing software tools have come to my aid in reproducing them all. In fact I only had to draw one or two and all the rest were produced by tools such as ‘pattern on path’ which instantly created long rows of the things, following the contours of the surface on which they are placed. There must be at least 350 rivets on the tank surface alone. ‘Aurora’ Tank with added rivets Compare this illustration with the one in my previous post, where I had just completed the basic tank structure! It is the sort of job that could have been a nightmare, when using traditional construction techniques, but was relatively simple with 3D-modelling software – at least with ‘Fusion 360’, by means of its ‘pattern on path’ commands. I consulted several different drawings and found discrepancies between all of them. A consistent failing was in the width of the outer cladding of the smokebox, which was insufficient to surround the 24” diameter cylinders. I have widened the wrapper around the cylinders, as on many other engines of the period, although this does not appear on the drawings I have. The cross-section of the tank also varies between drawings although all agree that the tank is wider at the sides than the space above the top of the boiler. This is different from the full length tanks on, for example the Bristol & Exeter engines, where the tanks appear to be concentric with the boiler. Apart from that, the modelling and printing of the major components has gone extremely smoothly. I thought I might have a printer problem, since the print head was very slow to warm up, when I first used it after a break. My printer is unusual in that the head is part of a separate, plug-in module that contains the head itself, with its heater and thermocouple. I wriggled it a little in its socket and all was well again. I suspect that the heater draws quite a large current, so there will be a substantial power drop if there is any resistance at the electrical connector. Following my usual practice, I printed the main body of the engine as three major components and a couple of minor ones. The Firebox, Smokebox, and Tank were all designed to fit around a length of brass tubing, which forms the boiler and provides the main structural component of the model. As on the prototypes, one only sees the ‘cosmetic’ outer skin. The two minor components are the backplate and the front of the smokebox. 3D-printed Main Components I’ll not go into much detail about the construction of the main components, since my methods have been described in earlier posts. Note, however that I have included a filler cover for the tank and holes to provide mounting points for the chimney, sand-box, and safety-valves cover. I shall single out the front of the smokebox for some more detailed comments. This small component could easily have been combined with the main smokebox in the 3D drawing but could then prove difficult to print, with my fused deposition printer, which needs a flat surface to start from and no major overhangs. The inside of the smokebox needs to be a clear space to accommodate the brass tube, which forms the ‘spine’ of my model. The front of the smokebox can be made very thin so that, when laid flat on the bed of my printer, the complete job prints in only about 6 minutes. Once having copied the profile from the cross section drawing that I had used for the smokebox itself, I then added details to the front surface as described below. ‘Aurora’ Smokebox Front After sketching the outline in ‘Fusion 360’, I extruded the sketch to create a flat plate, 0.5 mm in thickness. Using this surface as my drawing-plane reference, I first drew two pairs of concentric circles to represent the cylinder covers. I also drew one small circle to represent one of the bolt heads and then used the ‘pattern on circle’ to create a ring of 16 bolt heads for each cylinder cover. I find it best to extrude the deepest parts first, so that the drawings for other parts remain visible on the surface. So, I selected all the smaller circles and extruded these by 0.5 mm. I then selected the annulus between the inner and outer large circles and extruded this area by 0.25 mm. Next, I tackled the smoke box door. This is made up of a series of three-point arcs and straight lines, to create the outer rim of the door. Then I sketched one of the door latches and used the ‘copy/move’ command to replicate the other catches at the required locations and orientations.similarly, I drew the outlines of the two hinges at the bottom of the door. As before, I extruded the drawings of the latches and hinges by 0.5 mm and the rim of the door itself by 0.25 mm. For the rivets around the edge, I created a single rivet as a ‘New Body’ at the top of the smokebox front and then used the ‘pattern on path’ command to create replicas all around the edge. I selected the ‘symmetrical’ and ‘align to path’ options, to spread the rivets evenly in each side and at a constant distance from the edge. The distances that I quote are all the result of trial and error, a process that is greatly facilitated by the very short print times of components such as this. I made the backplate in exactly the same way, although this is thicker to allow for curved fillet round the edge, which was polished brass in the prototype. I sketched and raised the firebox door and the minimal controls The end result, with the components all mounted onto a brass tube (visible through the chimney aperture), is shown below: Complete boiler assembly with components mounted on brass tube Next, I shall turn my attention to designing and constructing a suitable chassis.
    5 points
  14. I've rather struggled with this one. There were only four of them, and they were all built by one builder. How difficult can it be? Well, one source of confusion was that I had 4 drawings, one Barry weight diagram, two GWR weight diagrams and a distorted photo of a drawing by Trefor L. Jones, whose work is generally excellent, but I think may have been struggling with some of the same issues. They were contradictions all over the place. I also had few photos, and all of those were front 3/4 view, so particularly muddy in the tender region. So lets go through some of the issues, and the choices I made. These locomotives were built by Sharp Stewarts for the Swedish and Norwegian Railway, and the Barry acquired them. They were from two different batches, and the first ones were acquired unused, but the second two were older and had seen some service in Norway. The first two were Barry 35/6, GWR 1387/8, and the second two Barry 92/3, GWR 1389/90. The first sketch is intended to represent 35 and 36 from around 1902 when they received the tender weatherboards. At this stage the locomotives seem to have been mostly used for heavy local coal trains in the Barry area. In 1909 however the Barry decided that the second two should haul main line coal traffic, and they were modified with new boilers, and new cabs, and the tenders given increased water capacity. All the references state the increased water capacity was from adding a well tank between the frames, but I think in photos I see the tank above the frames as having been extended to the end of the frames, and so I've chosen to draw that. I don't have anything that gives me any clues about the well tank. Another puzzle is the cutout in the tender frames. Both the later GWR weight diagram (B) and Jones draw a cutout coming nearer to the top of the frames, but I don't see that in photographs, so I've chosen to ignore that. Another feature drawn in GWR diag B and Jones is coal fenders on the tender, but there's no photographic evidence for these and RCTS states they weren't fitted so I've chosen to omit them. On the locomotives there is variation in sanding arrangements. According to the photos at least 1390 lost the big sandbox alongside the firebox and had it replaced by one in the cab, so I've attempted to reproduce that. So the second drawing is intended to be representative of the second two in their GWR days, but the only external modifications that are GWR are the safety valve cover and chimney. Other differences from the first drawing were made in Barry days. The first two retained the round side window cab and tender weatherboard into GWR days, although at least one of them acquired a GWR safety valve cover. Other issues - tender brakes were especially contradictory, and the result is little better than a guess. I'm also getting footplate height variations between drawings, so I'm not as confident as I might be about some of the detail and proportions in that sort of area. But for what its worth, this is my first pass at this interesting and unusual class, but modelers especially should note all my caveats. The NRM have an appreciable collection of detail drawings from the D as well as the weight diagrams. I can't possibly justify purchasing copies, but the prospective modeler might want to consider a trip to York to see if they provide more useful information.
    5 points
  15. Incredibly, it's 12 months to the day since I posted the first pictures of Stourpayne Marshall on rmweb. As elaborated on at the time, this isn't a new layout, but an identity-swap for my existing GWR-based layout King's Hintock. Using various dodges, King's Hintock can be swapped over to an S&D station (and back again if needed) in about twenty minutes. In the course of the transformation, the station building moves from one side of the tracks to the other, the goods shed is relocated, and the sidings are somewhat truncated. Although still fictitious, Stourpayne Marshall is much more rooted in reality than King's Hintock, as it has a clearly defined location, rather than just somewhere in the West Country. Set on the double track section of the S&D a few miles south of Blandford, its name is a cunning amalgam of the two halts Stourpaine and Durweston (just north of Blandford) and Charlton Marshall (just south). The spelling of Stourpayne rather than Stourpaine is in keeping with fictitious locations on previous layouts, honoring a family name of Payne. The station building and signal box are from the Bachmann models of Shillingstone. The goods shed is from the same range but I've set to see a photo or drawing of the supposed structure at Shillingstone. However, with some added details and weathering it looks in keeping. The main function of the model was to scratch a long-standing itch to model the S&D, owing to family connections, and I've very much enjoyed the journey so far. Other than the scenic side of the layout, much of the work so far has been directed to recreating specific locos that ran on the line, drawing on the many books and articles which the S&D has attracted. A certain amount of modeller's license has been applied with regard to period accuracy, however, as the layout's remit is very much about having fun and not being too bothered that this engine couldn't have run with that one, and so on. A case in point is this Fowler 2P which is correctly numbered for an S&D example, but which is carrying early "British Railways" lettering on the tender, which was gone by the mid-50s and so wouldn't have been seen in conjunction with Maunsell coaches in Southern Region green, as hitched behind the equally out-of-period lined maroon GUV below: A similarly lax attitude is taken with regard to Bulleid pacifics, in both original and rebuilt condition. Having at least some focus has been enjoyable, nonetheless, and it also applies to the two long-distance passenger trains which operate on the layout. No longer are they just any old trains, but one is the northbound Pines Express, and the other the Cleethorpes-Exmouth service. Although very little effort has been made to model accurate formations, at least the trains have a definite identity and a sense of where they are going and coming from. The same applies to the various stopping services which operate on the layout. Even after a year, there's still much to do. Late last year I started drawing up lists of which Bulleid pacfics would be suitable as renaming candidates for my existing locos, but it's only in the last couple of weeks that I've actually ordered the plates. Having a few S&D stalwarts among the roster will, it's hoped, further cement the line's sense of place. In the meantime, work on the passenger trains continues with a much-needed catering car soon to be added to the Exmouth service. In addition, although it could equally well apply to the GWR-version of the layout, slow progress has been made on the scenic treatment for the branch junction, which has been looking very unfinished since the major work a few years ago. I must admit, once the electrical side of it was done, and the branch could function as an additional off-scene destination, I was quite happy just to enjoy the extra operational possibilities without worrying about how it looked. However, I've vowed that I won't start some major work on the other side of the layout until this area is largely finished, so progress has at last been made over the summer. There's still work to do but it's mostly of the pleasant kind rather than anything too messy. The junction is quite a bucolic sort of place and I look forward to adding greenery around the river banks, before pouring the water. I could have squeezed in another building or two here but I tried to resist the urge, as it's one the parts of the layout where things aren't too busy and I think it would be good to keep it that way. In addition, there's also been some slow progress on adding some period S&D stock to the layout, for pre-grouping or early Big Four operations. Thanks to Jerry Clifford, I was finally able to complete the decals on this passenger luggage van: There is still much more to be done not just with this vehicle, but with the seven other S&D passenger carriages still to be finished! However, hopefully it will be a inducement to further progress. Perhaps the obvious thing to ask at the end of this is, when will the layout revert to GWR mode? The truth is that I'm in surprisingly little hurry. There is still much more to be done from an S&D standpoint, and from an aesthetic standpoint, there's something about the current arrangement of the station which actually looks a little more balanced than before. Oddly, it actually works better with the shorter siding - not just from a visual point of view, but also operationally. Having a long siding just meant that it got clogged up with goods vehicles, whereas now some discipline has to be applied and the result is all the better for it. Having the branch operational, too, allows for a steady flow of traffic on and off the scenic part of the layout. So, for now, the layout is very much remaining as Stourpayne Marshall. Thanks for reading, and following over the last year.
    5 points
  16. This engine was built to a Drewry Car. Co. design by Robert Stephenson & Hawthorns, in 1956. The type is very similar to what became British Rail's Class 04. It was powered by a Gardner 8L3 8-cylinder, 204HP diesel engine, driving through a Wilson 5-speed epicylic gearbox and until being bought and moved to Strong's yard in 1974 it had worked all its life for the Central Electricity Authority (later Central Electricity Generating Board). It wasn't in the best condition when it arrived and at least cosmetically things went downhill from there on. Most of the engine casing doors were discarded as they would get in the way every time the crews had to start it as the cold start controls were missing from the cab, as well as it requiring copious amounts of ether down the air intakes. One day in 1977 the engine ran away and began running on its own sump oil. Being unable to stop it, the crew got well clear and watched as it put a rod out of the crankcase. There ended it's career. It was quickly despatched by propane torch and within a week had ceased to exist. Recorded by the IRS as scrapped w/e 5/8/77.
    5 points
  17. As can been seen the Beyer Goods is pretty much done, painted and numbered 334, but is still sans the springs above the footplate. It also features DCC sound in the tender! The return of High Level meant that I got the RoadRunner gearbox for the Armstrong Standard Goods so the chassis is built. I'm not too happy with the brakes that came with the kit but they fit and will be mainly hidden behind the outside frames. I have finally standardized on 31.75mm for the axle length on these outside frame locos and they just clear the platforms! Occasionally they clout the loading dock in the yard but I can sort that. Here the fittings have just been plonked on for the photo. Looking a bit like a lost Dean Goods without the springs; missing the front sandboxes, the springs of course and a tender! That's the next job.
    5 points
  18. Not much else to add really. First side done and satin varnished. Just got to repeat for the other side....
    4 points
  19. This has been bugging me for some time. The loco has been running a triang princess one with current spec standard 4 4-6-0 wheels. Main issue is those LMS footsteps. Also there was no representation of the sliding plate between the wheels. I had a spare 9F front bogie left over from a previous project and of course a couple of the GBL rears from the donor 4MTs. So here's the bits. After a quick go with the hacksaw And I am glad I now have a milling slide for my lathe, made short work of machining the triang frame to accept the new parts Parts loctited together and after a quick coat of satin black I'm happy Here's it in place
    4 points
  20. I'm not sure how I came to omit a sketch of this class from my book, but I certainly did. I included the tender version. Perhaps I was unsure how many drawings of similar looking pre-group pannier tanks should be included. They have one of the more complex histories. The 322 class tale started in 1864. They were thirty 0-6-0 tender engines, entirely of Beyer Peacock design, twenty ordered under the Gooch regime (322-341) and the rest (350-359) by Joseph Armstrong. They had plate (not sandwich) double frames with the running plate rising over each wheel to clear the cranks. They were rebuilt quite heavily from 1878, but not officially renewed. In six cases these rebuilds consisted of a conversion to saddle tank, and some numbers were swapped between locomotives so the tank locomotives took numbers 322-327, and the remaining locos 328 on. So from 1878-1885 the six 322 tank engines were created at Wolverhampton as conversions from tender engines. They had open cabs and full length saddle tanks as was conventional at this period. They received a variety of boilers in the late nineteenth century, receiving the Sir Daniel type in various configurations. After 1918, they mostly received pannier tanks, and those that survived into the 1930s had all received superheated P class boilers. Only one received an enclosed cab. One was scrapped in 1921, and the rest between 1928 and 1932. So this sketch represents the last gasp of what were by then sixty year old locomotives, albeit only a very limited amount of the locomotive would actually have been of that age. I can see no GW lettering on a photo of 322 in the last days, so I've left it off. The Sketch is based on the GWR weight diagram B31, but there are a few small changes based on a photo of 322, notably brakes, sanding and axle guards. And for interest, this sketch from the book is the original form of the class. Frames, motion components and maybe wheel centres are probably about all that was common to both! Tractive effort had increased from around 13,000lbs to over 18,000lbs.
    4 points
  21. Diesel substitution. A 47 heads south at Watford. A Deltic hauled Special passes Linslade heading north. Passing trains at the south end of Watford. A lone 310 trundles through Linslade nearing the end of its journey from Euston to Bletchley. Vintage Pullman. The Manchester Pullman heads north past the Box at Watford. A pair of 24s head a Special through Harrow as 47164 wheels a Tanker train south destined for the Eastern Region.
    4 points
  22. This huge locomotive, built in 1955 at the works of W.G. Bagnall of Stafford, should have been cut up on site at the colliery where it had worked in South Wales, but a mix-up in paperwork saw it arrive one day as part of the trip freight from Small Heath yard. It had travelled as part of several British Rail good services with its rods off and its appearance was a complete surprise to the staff at Watery Lane. It was the most powerful locomotive to have worked at Strong's and was fitted with a 400HP National Gas & Oil 6-cylinder diesel engine. It's working life at Strong's was short as it spent most of the time stored in the shed. It was sold to an operator in Italy and is believed to have since been preserved there.
    4 points
  23. I have several posts on RailMaster(pro edition) on this blog as I got more and more into it. It is simple to use and suited my needs as someone new to DCC. However I have been more and more frustrated with its reliability: It is not designed for Windows 10 It has an arcane licensing setup It has a lot of lag on throwing points and sending functions to locos as it is working like an old dial up modem over a com port and this also means it takes ages to read and write CVs to locos It now has an annoying feature (aka bug) where newly added locos only go at full speed when you set any throttle at all. I was also hoping that detection would be added one day.. However what I have seen is Hornby reverting to DC control and no innovation of either its ageing Elite controller or the RailMaster software, so I finally decided to swap out the Horny components, but for what? My goal has always been to run two or more locos at once without worrying that they'll collide, derail or cause a short as they run across points that are set against them. I have sort of prevented this up until now by having safety track where the power is only applied if the point is set correctly, but this is crude as the loco just stops as do any sounds or lights it has. Now thanks to a great afternoon with Iain Morrison I have seen how detection can bring a layout to life by having multiple trains running without needing to watch over them constantly. I have pretty much decided to replicate what Iain uses, having read a lot of forums and watched a lot of YouTube. I budgeted for £2K for this project which might sound a lot but most of my fellow enthusiasts have spent over 10K on trains alone. I was more worried about how much rewiring I had to do which I'll cover in an a separate post. This is what I ended which is also what Iain has: iTrain Plus software for automation Roco Z21 and Z21 single booster for DCC control as I now plan to have a separate track and accessory bus 5 x Digikiejs DR5088RC detection units and a loco net hub However I did do my own research: iTrain Plus My decision was based on quality, reliability and innovation, coupled with ease of use. I could have used the free jmri but the interface is awful I couldn't get it to install and the manual is a train wreck. Train Controller is way more expensive and doesn't seem to be as innovative or offer anything I need over iTrain. Roco Z21 Not the cheapest, but supports loads of standards and it just worked when I plugged it into my home network - I did not even need to use the supplied router as I am whizz on computer networks. I really liked how it resets a short and the booster has the option not to pass the short to the Z21 itself ( the Z21 drives the accessory bus and the booster is used for the track bus). Plus it's got great diagnostics and update tools and just works with iTrain. I was also impressed with its programming on main and how fast it reads cvs on locos. Digikiejs DR5088RC detectors They do what they say on the tin. I was impressed with the diagnostics software and if you get an isolating usb dongle to connect one of these to a laptop and have it powered to your track you can see it detecting: So at £90 for 16 detection points the cost seems reasonable to me Putting that combination together I was able to quickly test that iTrain picked up that detection information to display it on the switchboard of my layout. City of London 3439 in siding C There's a lot to setting up automation, but I have already seen the benefits of this new setup: I can control my layout right near where I am testing as my laptop running iTrain is on the house network along with the Roco Z21, so if I have made a mistake somewhere I can test much more quickly without navigating all the beams in my loft: iTrains running on my laptop with no wires attached In the following posts I want to share my journey to make all this work, as I have noticed there is good content on each part of the system by not how they work together
    4 points
  24. Ceridwen was built by Peckett,& Sons Ltd. in 1896, one of their W4 class 14-inch saddle tank locomotives. She was new to Exuperias Gittins & Co. Railway Contractor for use on the contract to improve the Calder Vale Mineral Railway after it gained a Light Railway Order and was upgraded to carry public passenger services. She spent time between other contracts in Gittins' plant yard, near Wrexham until being sold, in 1908 to The Hughes Navigation Coal Co. at their Nant-Y-Mynydd colliery in South Wales. It was here where she gained the nameplates and where she worked alongside another W4 named Taliesin. In 1919, Ceridwen was returned to Pecketts to have a new boiler fitted and to have the cab lowered and the footplate dropped in order to work at one of the company's subsidiaries, the Rhymney Patent Solid Fuel Works. She worked here until being laid aside, in 1938, when, among other things, major work was required to the firebox. In 1943 Ceridwen was requisitioned by the Ministry of Fuel and Power and was sent to The Yorkshire Engine Company, in Sheffield, to be overhauled before being sent to work at an opencast site, near Mansfield. Peckett's records show spares being sent to various opencast sites around the country until 1947 when orders for spares came from Small Heath gas works. It was from here that Strong bought her after she was displaced by diesels in 1966. She was a regular performer at Watery Lane and was favoured over the diesels by her usual driver. She was sold to members of the Foxfield Railway in 1978. You won't find here here though as she is currently undergoing a rebuild at a private location. Seen as Exuperias Gittin's No.3, at Brookfoot, on the CVMR, circa 1897. Ceridwen and Taliesin, at Nant-Y-Mynydd, just before the outbreak of the Great War. Ceridwen at Watery Lane, July 1973.
    4 points
  25. I have decided to finally have a go at scratch building a loco using a combination of resin castings/3d prints, plasticard and a bit of brass. 3d CAD drawings have been started, looking forward to having a go at building
    3 points
  26. A delivery from Brassmasters today with the remaining parts for the Dean Goods, I have replaced the oil pipe cover with the Finney part (which has a little more meat to it than the Oxford one). A pair of Finney lamp irons were added to the footplate (I think these were missing on the base model), I am debating replacing the end lamp irons as well. Finally on the engine the Finney smokebox door dart was glued in place. Moving onto the tender, a pair of Springside break / water scoop handles were glued in place. Another lamp iron was glued into position on the rear of the tender. The biggest change was to the tender top, gluing in place the Finney dome and filler. The dome needed filing down to size to get it to fit, (part being hidden under the coal). If the the weather is dry tomorrow it will get primed (and hopefully sprayed into wartime black)
    3 points
  27. Because I grew up in the days of King Coal and was born in Newcastle-upon-Tyne it's not surprising that I fancied a few of these new coal hoppers. They didn't last too long in the required sector, but were used for many other products, even sugar beet ? In my opinion a super little kit, very little to complain about and I'm currently running 2 without any decals. Must road test before finishing, partially while trying to decide what loads to add, be it sand, coal, iron ore, sugar beet. The load will help regarding the very light weight, with nowhere to add much invisible ballast. They weigh in at 11.06 grams, with a shred of lead in the voids behind the buffers I've reached 12.46 grams. Much to my surprise one in lightest form was able to pull 33 wagons around my garage layout that has some 1st radius curves. A bonus from trying to run my stock in it's lightest reliable condition, having said that the Bachmann 3F Jinty couldn't pull the train, but a Hornby J94 could !!. Seen in a much shorter train :- Geoff T.
    3 points
  28. Another new restoration project sourced from eBay for the bargain price of just under £30 will add an Oxford Rail Dean Goods to the loco fleet. The source model is the later release (with single flywheel and coreless motor), has had a very bad respray (along with some damaged detail parts) and was sold as a non runner because the seller was confused about the loco - tender coupling and DCC. In fact it is just a standard DCC ready release and once loco and tender are connected runs nicely. Dean Goods were not exactly a common sight in 1947 Devon, however I have seen mention somewhere of a Dean Goods getting to Laira in 46/47 on a freight. This is something I find quite plausible having previously found a photo of a Dukedog on a Bristol – Laira freight, though my most likely use will be that the loco ends up pinched to run on a local freight while it was in Devon. Work will involve: Finding a suitable loco which matches the core details (boiler/cabside cut out/ cab width) of the Oxford model, other details like the chimney, tender dome etc can be rebuilt). Preference is going to be for a Bristol sheded loco. Strip down and full respray, I am tempted to do the respray with body and chassis joined together in order to hopefully reduce the impact of the gap between upper and lower boiler. The intention is to save Oxford’s cab interior. Add missing washout plugs (Gibson) Potential changes to chimney and tender dome (Coastline Models via Shapeways) Repairs to model: It needs a new smokebox dart, castings on the tender and tender handrails DCC Etched plates (Narrow Planet) Dingham couplings Finally the chassis is missing the brake linkage from one side, hopefully Oxford will sell a spare for this (do they even do spares?) else it will need fabricating. The start point…
    3 points
  29. This evening I took some smartphone photos of my current layout project, something that I quite often do as it progresses to get a sort of scale eye view of things. I think of the layout, in scenic terms, as a set of cameos shaped by images and recollections. In the case of this layout, although I can contribute to the scenic setting from my own memories and photos, the details of the railway must all come from photos in books and online. Because I have been thinking about backscenes quite a lot recently, I decided to edit in a photographic background that would roughly match my imagination. It's a photo I took from a hotel window as it happens. The result is pretty rough and ready but I think this addition transforms the images. They become a lot more like sketches of the desired result. No apologies for the grainy photos or the fact that everything is far from the finished state I would like to reach. That's the point. And also, the fact that I've sliced out the background very roughly and the lighting angles and colour cast don't match. This is impressionism rather than documentary! Firstly, the station depicted by the layout is cut into slightly higher ground and the back of the layout includes the slope where the area cleared for the railway land meets the natural land level. The slope has been cut back to give space to a large shed that has something to do with the freight transfers that take place on the outermost track. These features are shown below. And again with the photographic background Secondly the station building at the very end of the branch. Here is is with the natural background And with the photographic background. Must straighten that whistle. And get on with the layout!
    3 points
  30. Roco make a good model of the English Electric 350hp shunter built for Nederlandse Spoorwegen. This locomotive is structurally much the same as a BR class 11 with different lamps and detail changes. I bought one of the first-generation Roco models from Elaine's Trains last year and have finally got round to the coupling conversion. The model has built-in "Continental" loop and hook couplers but browsing through the Gaugemaster site I found Roco do a plug-in NEM socket. This is Roco part number RC100829, it isn't illustrated by Gaugemaster and it has the snappy name of "spare" on their site. So I hope posting this here is useful to someone! The NEM sockets are set relatively far forward so a Kadee short number 17 coupler is plenty long enough, and the sockets are a nice tight fit on the shank. This is a 30-year old model - if only the UK manufacturers could make conversions so simple. Before New coupler pocket installed, original coupler removed First train - perfect I want to keep this model in its original condition including its NS livery. The model is not terribly unprototypical for a British layout because at least one sister engine (600-series) has returned to the UK to work on the Middle Peak Railway. This model is my token analogue locomotive for the layout. It would be useful if I ever take the layout to a show and the DCC controller should pack up. The model runs well on a KPC feedback controller, and it also ran well on a Morely "Vector" (non-feedback) controller when I had one. Unfortunately, the 500 series did not have a train brake. So this locomotive can only do shunting in a yard; a train will need a brake van I haven't got. Prototype information culled from the web NS class 500 - the Dutch wikipedia entry is more helpful than the equivalent English one Locomotive brake only Running number by Roco is 523 Sister locomotive 521 was built in 1953 and is preserved at the Foundation Steam Train, Goes - Borsele (SGB) in South Beveland, Zeeland Modelled in the pre-1963 condition, before installation of a roof-mounted flashing light
    3 points
  31. Autumn is here, the nights are drawing in and thoughts once again turn to modelling!:-) As I mentioned in a previous blog entry http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/blog/1131/entry-20890-coal/ I've planned on building some private owner coal wagons for Sherton Abbas and now the layout is more or less complete the time has come to make a start. I wanted to represent wagons that would have been running in the Somerset / Dorset area circa 1905 and found the information contained in this book invaluable http://lightmoor.co.uk/books/private-owner-wagons-of-somerset/L9877 POW sides make 7mm versions of suitable wagons based on Slaters Plastikard kits http://www.powsides.co.uk/www.powsides.co.uk/info.php?p=2 POW sides kits The kits come pre-painted, lettered and incorporate excellent detail on the outside surfaces, however the sides and floor are completely smooth on the inside of the wagon. I decided that I would try to "improve" the appearance of the wagon's internal detail. I started by scribing planking onto the wagon floor using a ruler and compass point, sandpaper was use to remove any burred edges. Scribed planking I've noticed on previously constructed wagons that the sides begin to bow inwards over time presumably as the solvent used in their construction evaporates. In an attempt to avoid this happening, rather than scribing the sides I decided to individually plank them. Strips of 10 thou plastic card were fixed inside the wagon using liquid poly, in theory this should form a laminate with the outside of the wagon in compression and the inside planking in tension giving a stable box shape. Quite how successful this will be remains to be seen! Internal planking Prototype coal wagons often exhibit bulging sides, in order to simulate this spacers were cut from an old steel ruler to force the sides apart while the glue. Wagon drying with spacers in situ Once the sides had thoroughly dried the spacers were removed and the internal framing was represented using varying thicknesses of micro strip. I found John Hayes' book on coal wagons https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1874103488/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o09_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 a really useful source of information regarding prototype practice. Internal strapping The next step was to simulate the internal bolt heads. Small slices of 10 thou Slater's Plastikard rod were cut and then fixed in position on the planking with a tiny drop of liquid poly. I can't pretend that this process is anything but tedious, my wife thought I was quite mad:-) Its probably no worse than ballasting track work and does give some texture to the inside of the wagon. Capping strips were simulated with micro strip and detailed with more cosmetic bolt heads Adding bolt heads The rest of the wagon's construction follows the Slater's Plastikard instructions. I've completed another of the wagons, so two down, two to go! Once the other pair are completed I can make a start on the painting and weathering of the four wagons which will be the next blog entry. Completed pair of wagons Sherton Abbas will be appearing at the Portsmouth Model Railway show https://www.shmrc.org.uk/exhibition/ on Saturday the 17th November, do come over for a chat if you are attending the exhibition. Until next time........ Best wishes Dave
    3 points
  32. This Ruston & Hornsby 88DS was built in 1951 for the White Peak Limestone and Tarmacadam Co. Ltd, for use at their roadstone coating plant, near Matlock. It isn't known exactly when it arrived at Small Heath, but it must have been after the take-over of WPL&T by The Shelby Group as it was already carrying a Shelby logo when it arrived. It seems that it was sent to the Watery Lane workshop for repairs and was exchanged with another loco and stayed at Watery Lane and Strong's scrapyard. After rail traffic ceased at Strong's, it was parked in the former Midland goods and grain warehouse and was missed by the Strong's men and the contractors who cleared the site after closure and clearance of the yard. A group of IRS members visited the goods and grain warehouse in 2002. By this time it was being used by a tyre fitting company and the loco was found under a thick layer of dust and a pile of used tyres! It is still there but several attempts by enthusiasts to purchase it have failed due to the owner of the site thinking that it is worth far more than it really is.
    3 points
  33. So having more or less finished CC70001, I realised it's in need of some wagons to shunt in it's upcoming boxfile layout home. A locotracteur would be a much better choice for a boxfile, but hey.... Being short of cash for modelling projects, I borrowed an idea from another RM webber (sorry I have forgotten your username) and bought one of those cheap plastic trainsets from Ebay. £9 got me three roughly ho-scale wagons and a battery-powered loco (not sure what I'll do with it yet). Wagon one is now more or less complete, having been re-branded from a petrol tanker (really) to a grain hopper. I went with Coopagri Bretagne because I like their logo. First attempt at weathering with watercolours, and quite happy with how it turned out. Thanks Ken
    3 points
  34. My latest conversion of a RTR loco is Bachmann Compound 4P 41157 which I have renumbered 41140 as I have a photo of it on shed. Conversion follows my now standard method using Alan Gibson wheels with Markits 10BA crankpins, reusing the Bachmann motion. The tender has a Dave Franks chassis but this time I had to leave off the water pickup gear in order to add extra pickups on the two rear axles of the tender. I'm pleased with the conversion. Here is a video of 41140 on a Gloucester to Bristol TM passing Barrow Road MPD https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jWIO-gKhAkU
    3 points
  35. SEPTEMBER 2021 VIDEO Its taken since mid August to put this video together and edit but finally here it is. A broad selection of weekday and Summer Saturday workings from the 1957 timetable including the Pines Express. Freights both up and down the S&D and on the Mangotsfield line and some ‘on shed’ shots. Watch out for banking up the steep 1 in 50 through Lyncombe Vale with train engine 7F 53802 and banker 4F 44560. Both R/C battery operated and with sound. I hope that you enjoy the latest video from BATH GREEN PARK https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wHUbtMpVDBo&t=3s
    2 points
  36. A break in the rain this evening allowed me to get the Dean Goods painted, Halfords etch primer at lunchtime followed by a coat of their satin black. This was followed by a first pass at weathering, adding a dirty black/brown mix to the frames and footplate and a start to dirtying up the boiler top. It needs transfers (for which I’ve ran out of GWR transfers for the tender) before it can be mat varnished so I can get on with the weathering powders. For the moment it looks a bit odd with dirty mat finish top and bottom and a very shiny boiler side in between I have fitted a Lenz gold in the tender, to get it to fit I ended up hacking away a big chunk of the moulded insides of the tender (hidden by the coal load). The load will eventually get covered with real coal once the weathering is done. Ive ordered nameplates from Narrow Planet (but they may take a while to arrive), so the only other job remaining is sorting out the break linkage on the other side.
    2 points
  37. A quick knock up of Bere Dene's track plan: Again, signals are educated guesses, rather than final arrangements. This time the passing loop lines aren't bi-directional. It is my intention to model a section of line between Bere Dene and Arnford as a simple, single straight line through a forest, on a set of 1 foot wide boards I already have. Although I don't think I'd ever have space to put it with this vignette, I like the idea of it being possible to directly connect it to the left end of this plan.
    2 points
  38. So after a lot of procrastination (oh yes...), here's a first look at my upcoming boxfile layout. The setting is deliberately vague (or just inaccurate), somewhere in NE France between the late 1970's and mid 1990's. When finished there will be two boxfiles joined end-to-end, with a road overbridge to cover the join. There will be a sector plate or fiddle yard at one end (accessed through a tunnel portal), representing the rest of the SNCF system. In the photos 70001 is arriving light engine from its home depot at Chalindrey. There will be one siding for assorted freight stock and locos, possibly awaiting repairs. The other siding will be a (very) small oil or lpg terminal, as I have seen several photos of mainline sncf diesel and electric locos with trains of only 1 or 2 lpg tanks. I will probably also work in some decaying heavy industry. I'd love to do prototypical trains of 20-30 grain wagons, but it's never going to happen.... So there you go. This will probably take a while to complete (sorry), but any comments and suggestions are welcome. Thanks Ken
    2 points
  39. The first job for this project was to completely strip the existing awful paint finish from the model, it was stripped down to its component parts. This included the removal of the chimney, splashers, smokebox door, fall plate, whistles, handrails and buffers. The removed parts were stuck to a length of masking tape to keep safe, somehow it has disappeared in the garage. Thankfully this only contains the whistles, pipes along the footplate and buffers, so nothing irreplaceable. With that done it was dunked into a bath of 70% IPA, left for an hour and then scrubbed with an old toothbrush. This was followed by another soak in IPA and removing the remaining paint with cotton buds and cocktail sticks. With the main body of the loco and tender prepared, the same process was followed with the splashers, smokebox door and chimney. As the paint started to come off, the moulded detail started to return and you could finally see some washout plugs. That said, the washout plugs still looked a little anaemic, so they have all been drilled out in preparation for adding some Gibson replacements. The splashers have all been modified to remove the extra rivets. I did give a lot of thought as to whether or not I should have a go at improving the splasher size, in the end I decided to leave it alone given that while fixing the separate ones the splasher integrated with the cab side would be more difficult to get a consistent finish. a little more sanding is needed on the cab side to remove the last remains of the old moulded number plate, while the boiler could do with a little fettling with emery paper as well. The tender needed a little more attention to repair some damage, both front handrails had previously snapped in the centre so these had to be removed and replaced with brass wire. The rear handrails were completely missing, so some replacements were added with 0.45mm wire and Markits handrail knobs. While the removal of the original paint had certainly helped improve the damage under the former BR early crest, a little filler was needed to fill the remaining cuts in the tender side. This still needs a further coat of filler this evening to complete the job. Finally the missing short buffer between loco and tender was added. After a quick look I couldnt see an obvious source of these buffers, but had a feeling that I had some brass nails for hanging photos which was of a similar size. The head was filed down to get rid of the domed top, while the shaft was cut to length with an old pair of Xurons before gluing into place. The final job on the tender was to remove the moulded parts for the filler etc from the rear of the tender, and add a plasticard spacer into the resulting gap. This will mostly end up covered with the Finney dome and separate filler once my order arrives. The only other jobs remaining on the tender are to add a missing lamp iron to the centre of the tender back (again in the Brassmasters order), and to add Dinghams. The latter will need the hooks modifying to fit in the Oxford slot thanks to the bizarre choice for a die cast tender chassis. There is also a very annoying scraping noise coming from the tender pickups, so that will need some attention in due course. I think I am going to be modelling 2534 or 2578 (both Bristol St Phillips March locos). However I have not managed to find a late 1940s photo of either loco, just much later images in BR days. 2578 is shown with the additional step on the side of the smokebox, and a horizontal rear handrail in BR condition, but no way of determining when these changes were made. In both cases there is no clear view of the tender, so I am assuming like the majority they would be with the separate dome / filler unlike the model. I have now placed an order with Brassmasters for the Finney castings for the tender dome/filler, smokebox door dart, along with the smokebox pipe cover (which I think looks a little oddly proportioned). I will need to scratch build the missing brake linkage on the other side of the chassis as I cant see mention anywhere of a source of Oxford Rail spares. Unless a prototype image comes up saying otherwise, the plan is currently that I will finish the model in wartime black (of course if anyone has more info about either of these two locos in the late 40s it would be very welcome). The model will likely stay without numbers for the time being until I get around to placing a Narrow Planet order for another batch of numbers.
    2 points
  40. Having deleted RailMaster, put my Hornby Elite in the electronics recycling bin and swapped in a Roco Z21 controller with iTrain I wanted to see how they worked with my layout before getting into the detection side of things. Here's my layout in Hornby RailMaster Pro I have enabled displaying the point's ID numbers as I want to refer to them when setting up the same points in iTrain. The old Railmaster diagram does resemble my layout .. Comparing that to a pretty close schematic of my layout in SCARM It's roughly the same but RailMaster is confusing for me - Even at 50% there aren't really enough squares to make it look like it is and you have to fudge 3 way points and double slips by using two points for each of these. To be fair my first go at iTrains was daunting. Some things are familiar but there lots of detailed settings and of course the jargon used is different. I started by slowly by just creating the switchboard to reflect my layout: To my eye this looks neater and more like the actual layout: There are specific symbols for 3 way points and double slips rather than the Railmaster bodge of using two points to represent them. I can see my station and the turntable is resizable although I have yet to try and see how to get an ADM turntable to work with it The size of the grid doesn't matter so much and the curved corners are more elegant Another key feature for me is that iTrain supports modern operating systems from Windows 10/11 (I am running it on windows 11 myself) to Apple (OSX and IOS) and linux distros The obvious downside of iTrain Plus edition is at least double the price the price of Railmaster Pro. However unlike RailMaster which is strictly per device, iTrain can be installed on many devices so I can design layouts in my office, use my all in one Touchscreen PC as my main layout controller, and have it on a laptop right next to where I am working if I am troubleshooting or configuring new stuff. I can use any of these to drive my layout. Moreover iTrain is designed around detection and automation and because I’ll be using those features, it is better value for money for me. I also think some railway modellers can be put off by the complexity and richness of iTrain. That's partly why I am writing this. I could have spent hours getting confused on YouTube watching others try to explain how to use it and use it and all the theory, but I chose a different path. Start simple, learn the basics and apply the principle of RTFM (Read the ... Manual) : Get the switchboard looking like the layout you have Configure every point so that they throw correctly to match what you can see on the switchboard Add a test loco and run it! All the advanced stuff for routes, detection and speeds can wait until you are ready to explore more. It's like learning to play guitar , learn three chords (may be enough if you are a Quo fan) , learn strumming, learn timing and rock 'n roll you are making music. Sure there are more chords, licks and playing with your teeth, but that's for later That's what I have now done and a couple of days I feel at home and I really like using it - For example the fact that all of the settings for every accessory, loco and can be seen in a list that can be sorted and there is a diagnosis screen to show you what needs fixing later -For example I have not done any measuring yet (more on that later) It's also really really stable. So now I have found my way around iTrain my next task is to fix the wiring - Both to move to a track/accessory bus setup and to wire in the Digikeijs DR5088RC detectors. Finally a polite request - if there is anything wrong in here please let me know, as I do see a lot of conflicting advice out there, and my mission is to keep things simple but accurate.
    2 points
  41. A couple of diagrams. First Cold Holt and then Penmouth Waterside. Both featured in a thread on RMweb for signalling advice. Apologies for image quality, the files get compressed by RMweb's upload process and there's nothing I can do about it (it seems to be something to do with their pixel width, not their actual file size). Cold Holt is an interchange station between the S&P and the National Network. None of it exists in model form at present so it would be entirely new. However, for Penmouth Waterside some of it exists already. In the fiction it's a station that didn't exist originally when it was the site of a two loco engine shed and turntable with no loop, and just a single line through. In heritage era a sizable expansion was undertaken onto empty adjacent port land. The turntable was moved and a decent sized engine shed put in, plus a locomotive works. The area immediately offstage below the bottom of the layout is supposed to be a service road and sea front so nothing practical can go there, which is why the signals are all 'inside' the layout. The two lines to the left are both bi-directional, and all three roads through are also bi-directional. From a model and running perspective, the two central boards already exist from a previous layout build attempt, and as I only have 8 feet of operational scenic space where I currently live they have to be viable on their own without the two outer boards. Some of the track layout of that previous build is in situ and can't be moved (mainly the turnouts across the central board join) but the tracks below the shed (station and extra road) will be newly arranged (although it's going to be fun trying to lift and relay the C&L turnouts). Note that some of the track (notably the shed access Y) is not joined up - this is because the available track objects in AnyRail don't fit with what's actually in place, which is hand-built C&L points with some subtle curves in them. There was no suitable Y so that's just a placeholder Peco Y.
    2 points
  42. The Wagon Works has been active since the end of January when I last posted in my Blog thread. I'll have to check through exactly how much as once a project is finished, or nearly finished I just get on with the next thing and forget what's already gone under the bridge. One I have done half-cock as per usual is a Cambrian 10 ton ballast wagon. I thought I'd add some spoil from a small job, but was too impatient to await weathering first. I should add some more 'stuff', but this wagon is on my 'new' shunting layout that I've probably not mentioned on RMWeb An interesting project to drive, but also difficult to get the required slow running through Peco insulated Set-Track points. Then sorting out the Kadees. Nearly there, I think. Geoff T.
    2 points
  43. Little is known about this 48DS, other than it came from a railway wagon works in Nottinghamshire. It was noted being unloaded from a Shelby Group lorry in April 1975. A couple of weeks later, parts of what are assumed to be the same locomotive were seen from Garrison Lane bridge, in a BR mineral wagon. Presumed scrapped by 5/75.
    2 points
  44. The Peckett has received a coat of paint and the etched plates have arrived but not yet fitted.
    2 points
  45. NWR No. 700-703 NWR Name: Erin, Triumph, Vanguard, Powerful Wheel Arrangement 2-8-0/2-8-4T Builder Various Class ROD 2-8-0 (GCR 8K) History The first locos of this class were among those drafted in by the ROD to operate the newly-formed NWR during WW1. Upon cessation of hostilities, masses of these heavy goods locos were surplus to requirements and put up for sale. The embryonic company, faced with the withdrawal of government support, recognised that goods travelling via Tidmouth would be the lifeblood of its survival. It sought to purchase several of the ex-ROD locos then on the market. Of these, 4 made it past the grouping, the others were scrapped for their tenders or in the case of two, stripped of their vital components which were used in the Beyer-Garratt 'Revenge'. The best of the bunch were overhauled and given side-window cabs. They were named after great warships built by Vickers at Barrow-in Furness (the NWR clearly wanted to keep one of its biggest clients on-side). No. 702 'Vanguard' is pictured in this condition with original boiler. In 1926, one of the group was rebuilt into a 2-8-4 tank loco at Crovan's Gate. Train weights were increasing and delays in getting outbound trains up the sharply-inclined harbour line were worsening. No.700 'Erin' was thus allocated solely as Tidmouth Docks banker and spent most of its life on these duties. No. 700 'Erin' missing plates and whistle, fresh out of the paint shop. These brutes were the mainstay of NWR goods locos until the 1930s, when a purchase was made of several LMS designs, including several brand-new Stanier 8Fs. As the ROD boilers, which retained their steel fireboxes, came up for overhaul, they were rebuilt using new LMS type 3C boilers built under licence. This enabled standardisation of several components with the new locos. No.701 'Triumph' shown post-rebuild with 3C boiler. In this form they lived out the rest of their lives. One modification of note was the fitting of a Giesl Ejector to No.703 'Powerful' in the mid-1950s. This was an experiment to reduce fuel consumption. In the event, it was not fitted to any other members of the class although 703 retained the unusual chimney until withdrawal. No.703 'Powerful' with 3C boiler and Giesl Ejector. The Models More children of Hattons' 'sale of the century', I had long wanted to add some RODs to the fleet but this was a chance to acquire a few at bargain prices. The models are built from a mix of ex-GWR RODs and ex-LNER O4s, the GWR examples being rebuilt using second hand Hornby 8F bodies from the 1990s. The 2-8-4T uses another Hornby Fowler 4P body, Peters' Spares was selling a few new old stock plain bodies which have come in very handy. Between these and the cabs for the tender locos I am hoping to establish a 'house style' much like the neighbouring LMS. The extended tanks match the Woolworth 2-6-2Ts and No.301 quite nicely. Check out the build thread from this page for more!
    2 points
  46. After quite a lengthy delay, the 1361 has been finished, painted and weathered this weekend. It was great to get the airbrush out, though my set up was a little rudimentary. I just need a name plate, crew and couplings. Oh and balance weights and coal... But I'm quite happy how this has turned out. There are naff all clearances between the wheel rims and underside of footplate (that's why the Kernow one had splashers) so Ive lifted the body up slightly. All runs well and the CSB's work a treat. I took the liberty of taking a few shots on Stonehouse St James. Also visible are a variety of wagons that made it through the weathering shop this afternoon.
    2 points
  47. Just a quick, mostly photographic, update on the recent scenic work carried out. As described previously, the trees were made from sea foam with the trunks thickened up with builders caulk and ground foam used as leaves. The key is variation of colour and height to give a convincing look, I also painted a green wall on the backscene to ensure to reduce the amount of of blue sky showing through the branches. And to finish up here are a few artistic shots to give the false impression of progress
    2 points
  48. Having spent some time recently converting RTR models to P4 I decided I needed a change so here is a bit of scratchbuilding. The office for the shed foreman was situated in front of the roundhouse entrance. Looking at the maps and the photographs in my collection, I noticed a discrepancy in size of the shed and realised that around 1949 the length of the building doubled. This being confirmed by an aerial photograph in my collection. n. Using photographs I produced a scale drawing. Followed by a set of parts made out of plasticard. Assembly followed. With added detail. Heater chimney and vent pipe. il. Guttering is filed down tube whilst the downpipe uses a pair of Modelu holderbats. Some photos on the layout. The roof is not permanently fixed at present and I am aware some of the photos show a gap between it and the end wall.
    2 points
  49. A previous blog entry described the building of these wagons http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/blog/1131/entry-21530-coal-wagons-for-sherton-abbas/ Once I’d finished building the four wagons they need painting. I’ve tried using acrylic paints in the past but still much prefer working using enamels. The insides were painted in a greyish yellow base coat to represent unpainted wood, this was then dry brushed in browns and gunmetal to represent wood grain. The under frames, internal strapping and solebar iron work were painted in matt black. A fine brush was used to tidy up the lettering which I’d damaged here and there during construction. Next time I’ll varnish the sides to seal them before building starts! Painted wagons In order to tone down the wagon’s paintwork I applied a dilute wash of dark grey over all the internal and external surfaces. Once dry this muted the colours nicely without masking them too much. I then dry brushed lighter greys and rust tones over the iron work to highlight the textures and bring out the detail in the under frame and internal strapping. Wagons after application of dilute grey wash Once everything had dried a wash of dilute black was applied inside the wagon to simulate coal dust and enhance the separation of the internal planking. A similar but more subtle wash was then applied to the external surfaces again to enhance the surface detail and planking. Wagons after dilute black wash A light application of coal dust and crushed coal was then brushed into the internal corners and planking of the wagons and fixed in place with a mist of aerosol clear matt varnish. Application of coal dust I use Spratt & Winkle couplings on my stock, which although not particularly aesthetic, do work reliably and allow hands free shunting. Before assembly I chemically blackened the brass components using Birchwood Casey "Brass Black", which stops the shiny brass couplings looking too obtrusive! Couplings Now the wagons are finished here are a few pictures of them in service on the layout:-) Lady Jayne emerging from the Abbey woods on the private siding after a delivery of coal to the brick works. Proceeding down the line into Sherton Abbas station. Waiting at the siding signal With the signal set to clear "Lady Jayne" can proceed across the double slip prior to pushing the wagons into the exchange siding. Placing the empty wagons into the exchange siding where they will be collected by the next pick up goods. I'm pleased with the way the wagons have turned out and feel that the extra effort involved in adding the internal planking and bolt heads has been worthwhile. It does however mean that I'm going to have to "revisit" some of my other wagons who are sadly lacking! :-) Until next time...... Best wishes Dave
    2 points
  50. BSA coil / slab wagon , built using Cambrian side frames and bogies only , new floor covered in slaters chequer plate with plastruct bolsters, stanchion pins made from pins out of cd drives, only five to do for our avesta Sheffield layout Same wagon now with slab load, needs some Hornby class 60 buffers
    1 point
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