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  1. I've been thinking that railway modelling needs a better public image. People seem to think the hobby is a bit weird and nerdy, when really we’re a bunch of smooth adrenaline junkies. Here are some examples from my own awesome life. Firstly, we railway modellers have really cool gear. These DIY tamping and scribing tools were made from coffee stirrers and my wife’s discarded sock knitting needles. Max bling! The top three are for smoothing DAS between sleepers and under rails. I use Latex gloves to help seal glue containers. Aft
    39 points
  2. In 1884 the GWR centralized the provision of provender, so that every stable block on the system received a regular supply by rail from the provender store at Didcot, typically every 1-2 weeks. The supplies consisted of hay, chaff, straw bedding and sacks of feed. The feed included oats, beans and maize, either pre-mixed or separate. The sizeable stable block at Farthing obviously needs a regular supply of feed and bedding, so two provender wagons have been made. I began with a diagram Q1, using the Coopercraft kit. The GWR only made a total o
    38 points
  3. It's high time I posted an update on the scrap tank, which is approaching completion. Painting started with a coat of grey Halfords primer from a rattle can. I then used the airbrush to spray the basic green colour all over. I find that Tamiya acrylics spray quite nicely, so I used a mixture of olive green and white, thinned about 50:50 with Tamiya's own thinner. This works for me spraying at about 15 psi (although I don't really trust the gauge on my cheap and cheerful compressor). After painting the basic green colour I used a brush to paint the black smokebox, cream cab interior, and variou
    24 points
  4. The D38 Glass well wagon has given me a challenge but I’m reasonably happy with the overall result. The support frame has a slight lean, but it is only really noticeable in closeup and square on photos. As specials I think the wagon would be in good condition for the Edwardian era, it is in its first decade in service. I therefore just gave it some very light weathering. If someone has any transfers a scale 1” high that say “OIL” then I’ll buy some. those 3 dots above the axleboxes will have to do for now.
    23 points
  5. A damp Sunday morning at Porthmadog shed. GWR 43xx No.6324 stands outside Porthmadog loco shed, a sub-shed of Machynlleth 89C. The two road structure was built by the Cambrian Railways in 1907 and survived until August 1963. This is a box fresh Dapol Mogul and awaits light weathering, renumbering and reallocating to 89C. This is the second of the dioramas built for Modelu by Dan Evason of Tunnel Lane Model Railways and is photographed in natural light.
    21 points
  6. During the Cardiff model railway show back in October 2019, I treated myself to a couple of six wheel coaches from Dragon Models. http://www.taffvale.wales/page1.php Although I thoroughly enjoy building locomotives and wagons, I always find building coaches a bit of a slog and consequently haven't got many to use on Sherton Abbas My entire passenger stock comprises of three Slater's 4 wheel coaches, a solitary Slater's all 3rd bogie clerestory and an etched brass V2 passenger brake van. I'm about half way through a Slater's Clerestory brake 3rd dia D14 which I really should summon the enth
    20 points
  7. The main assemblies for the wagon are now largely complete. Frame has been detailed, spring castings should have more leaves but those look ok to my eye. Body has the sides fitted. and the floor is planked. Note the holes in the body sides. I think these were to enable the screw clamps to be tightened up when used at a lower level, together with a pair of clamps at the bottom of the well. The fiddly bit was making the support frames. This has taken me three attempts to get the proportions right and find a method for glueing all the
    19 points
  8. Just can't resist them. Can you? This one started off with a layer or three of water mixable oil paint (black) that was left to dry for three weeks. Not because it needed that long, but because I was doing other things. Each of the three layers was disrupted slightly by rubbing gently to remove that area of paint between edges of panels. The next step was to use an airbrush to apply a layer of AMMO by MIG Rust Wash, thinned with white spirit, across the upper surfaces to give a matt finish. Chimney, cab roof, dome and top of saddle tank. This was given 24 h
    18 points
  9. A few more printing projects over the last week. I found some nice pictures on the internet of the same sort of tortoise stove I'd seen at Thelkeld. The hardest bit to model up was the 'Celtic rope' design around the top, mind you I'm not sure drawing tortoises is my strong suite. The text around the top is tiny, the letters are .8mm tall and are have .25mm of relief. That they are visible once printed is nothing short of miraculous. I couldn't actually make out the text on the raw print and it only really became visible after painting and dry brushing. Owing to my stu
    16 points
  10. Buffer beams get dirty. They're not alone in that, obviously, but this aspect of weathering doesn't always get the attention it deserves, and I include myself there. There is much opportunity for detail weathering in O Gauge, so I decided to put a little more effort into this subject by applying a wash to the varied protruberances on the buffer beams. A straightforward process, involving a rigger brush, white spirit and MIG Dark Wash. The brush bristles are first loaded with white spirit and then dipped into the bottle of wash. The tip of the brush is applied to the edg
    16 points
  11. As I mentioned in my last blog the next bit of workshop machinery I fancied trying to reproduce was a pillar drill. This proved to be quite a tricky bit of modeling just because there were so many features. I'd taken a photograph of this drill in the shed at Thelkeld. It looked to me as if the drill was originally belt driven with a 'new' electric motor powering the original drive wheel at the bottom. There then seems to be a belt which takes the drive to the top of the drill via a choice of three pairs of pulleys depending on the speed you require. I could also see th
    16 points
  12. It's the turn of the airbrush now. The inderframe will be discoloured using Railmatch Sleeper Grime, applied with an Iwata Eclipse SBS. The driven wheels are turned while the paint is sprayed, to prevent there being a patchy finish to the rims. With N Gauge and OO/HO Gauge engines this can be done with a PP9 battery, but this doesn't work with O Gauge. I use two pieces of scrap OO Gauge rail screwed into place through a piece of wiring terminal block set at the width of the wheel treads and bent to the width of the battery terminals on the other side. The wheels are airbrushed firs
    15 points
  13. Since the previous post, the brake gear, under cab pipework and the basic footplate have been assembled and temporarily assembled, as shown in the last photo. This is the current state of play. Pipework underneath the cab - complete except the injector overflows. Chassis and footplate assembled. Dave.
    13 points
  14. Who hangs on to old tins of paint, wherein gloopy remains stick to the bottom? I have an old tin of Humbrol 27004 Metalcote Gunmetal, most of which was used for airbrushing onto wheels and smokeboxes in a black/gunmetal mixture. During a search for suitable buffer head grease I found that the otherwise unusable pigment that remained in the bottom of an improperly closed tinlet had an interesting property. A lump of this goo was attached to a buffer head, smeared about a bit and left to dry. Once dry, it was gently buffed to bring out the metallic sheen. On 1444 I have used this sim
    12 points
  15. A dark mix of Railmatch Weathered Black and Frame Dirt has been airbrushed over the top of the boiler, the cab roof and the driving wheel centres. This is to represent the soot present on the former two and the oil on the latter. The photograph that I have been using as a reference shows a much more marked contrast between the wheel rims and the wheel centres, but it does not look quite right to my eye so I have reduced the contrast by using a slightly darker shade of brown. Black Smoke pigment has been used on the smokebox and its door, with a very light application of the same to
    12 points
  16. A bit of a boring one really, as it concentrates more on a single part of the engine but ill try and bed it out a bit more with some more slightly interesting bits..... A view of 26043s 6LDA with both side covers removed (reason why will be explained in a bit) In this view you can see where the block is bolted to the crankcase, and you have a good view of the camshaft, there are 3 cam lobes per cylinder, the outer 2 of the lobes operate the pushrods and the centre lobe operates the fuel pump, also note that the camshaft is gear driven (a common sulzer trai
    11 points
  17. Almost there now. Some MIG Dark Mud pigment has been used to indicate the beginnings of surface corrosion on the chimney, and some Gunmetal metallic pigment has been used to indicate the beginnings of shiny handrail portions in the most used areas. Small amounts are crucial to the success of this type of effect. All pigment applications were done with a filbert brush. Only one more day to go.
    10 points
  18. The cab roof comes off! Heart in mouth moment when I removed the engine from its wheel-spraying cradle - something fell on the floor. Only the roof, though, not being held in place by the two small magnets any more. This gave me the idea of adding some grime to the easily accessible cab interior, so out came the MIG Dark Wash again and some was applied to the brightly coloured pipework. Not covering the whole assembly with grime, but just hinting that there had been some work going on in that area. Nothing more than a white spirit dampened rigger brush being dipped into
    10 points
  19. Out of the box this locomotive has a rather shiny smokebox, much more so than I would have expected. Before going any further I decided to apply a layer of Testor's Dullcote to that area so that pigments could be applied at a later date and that I could be sure that they would stick. Dullcote dries very quickly into a usable state. These photographs were taken only two minutes apart. My masking wasn't very good, so the Dullcote has landed on part of the leading wheels. I'll need to load up the airbrush to cover that small patch with another lay
    10 points
  20. The chassis of this model includes a representation of the inside motion, visible in the gap 'twixt boiler and running plate. It's bright red! I didn't want to hide this completely, so decided to add a layer of wash to the parts that were visible. The rigger brush was ideal for this task, enabling just enough wash to be deposited.
    10 points
  21. My workbench has a number of ongoing projects involving Bachmann Ivatt 2MT 2-6-0's which will appear in various future blog entries. Watch this space.... Reading and perusing the photographs of the excellent Volume 4B: Gloucester Midland Lines Part 3: South * by Neil Parkhouse the Dursley Branch has always held a fascination since I read Ben Ashworth's Last Days of Steam in Gloucestershire. Now to me an Ivatt 2MT 2-6-0 looks best in lined BR black. However Swindon built 46526/46527 the last two members of the class migrated to Gloucester 85B
    10 points
  22. Two members of a set of 5 Accurascale hoppers to be finished differently. A bit of a challenge, but I thought that if I tackled each one completely separately I ought to be in with a chance of success. I selected the paints and pigments before I started and will restrict what I use to just those choices. Railmatch Sleeper Grime Railmatch Roof Dirt AMMO Dark Earth pigment AMMO Russian Earth pigment Revell Matt Enamel No. 84 MIG Dark Mud pigment There is still work to be done on both, but progress is being made.
    9 points
  23. On the Mainline Royal Scot repair I detailed in previous entry, it was necessary to fix the valve gear support bracket from one loco onto the other. It is held in place by 2 small pins, however one was broken off. The plastic is quite soft and a bit soapy. I used a new glue I'd just got, which worked very well with that material. It's actually a liquid plastic welding compound which sets when exposed to ultra violet light. There are various makes of this now which seems a very new glue. This one is called 5 second fix, which is probably the cheapest one. The adhesive is in the
    9 points
  24. Anyone who has read any of my infrequent recent blogs or worse spoken to me, will know that nothing at all has happened on the modelling front for several months due the long over due and rather complicated decorating projects that have been going on. Unfortunately I have not completely finished as our house id a definite Forth Bridge sort of project but I am at the stage where I can take a well earned pause. While I was decorating the lounge the contents were decanted into the newly decorated study and as it is actually quite cosy in there very little has been put back as yet. The more deviou
    8 points
  25. A touch-up job this time. A friend had fitted sound, crew, coal and working lamp to this Jinty and removed paint from the coupling rods and brake gear in doing so. A half-cupful of Railmatch sleeper grime, weathered black and matt black soon sorted out that little problem.
    8 points
  26. A layer of Sleeper Grime/Frame Dirt mixture was prepared for airbrushing the sides, using more than the usual amount of white spirit. I wanted to be able to apply very thin layers, even thinner than my usual approach. Why a mixture of the two colours? Laziness, basically. My pot of one was empty and I couldn't be bothered to find another. The two colours are so similar that I didn't think it would matter. The whole of both sides and ends was given a thin application of this mixture and then a wide flat shader brush was used to drag it down the tank sides before it dried compeletely
    8 points
  27. It occurred to me that I could do something about making initial airbrushing tasks a bit easier with these models. Most of the photographs that I have been working from show much corrosion on the strengthening ribs all around the hopper body, and for the first couple of examples I airbrushed these freehand and didn't worry too much about the slight overspray that got onto the panels. For the third example I cut out a piece of 2mm greyboard to use as a mask that would allow me to airbrush just the ribs without getting overspray on the panels. It work
    7 points
  28. Taking onboard the comments on the mound I added the best part of another couple of inches to the top. I also altered the shape to I hope better match the rather pointed shape of the original. I've added an initial layer of static grass and made a couple of trial little bits of wall from Sculptamold (I just wanted to see if I could make a wall with it, I need to get the shapes better) I've got the goods shed bedded in a bit better (obviously still needs windows, capping stones etc. etc.) and also added the 3d printed yard crane in place. I don't think it looks too bad.
    7 points
  29. WC&PR started out with a few ancient pre-1870s wagons of unknown origins but under the management of Col. Stephens they acquired a significant number of later better quality stock, mostly 3 and 5 plank wagons and one ex-GER covered van. Most of the later WC&PR plank wagons were old MR stock which became surplus when in newer production series they updated the initial designs with several improvements and changes. Peter Strange in his book lists 24 numbered Open plank Wagons (WC&PR #2-12, #14-16, #18-27) and attributes them all as ex-MR stock. A large amount of valuabl
    7 points
  30. On the way to the workbench I passed a flock of newly arrived tail lamps making their way towards their traditional nesting habitat; to whit some buffer stops. Beautiful plumage. And so session number 2 with the signal kit. The next step in the instructions is to make the arm. All quite straightforward, but in the absence of any non-soldery pins to hold things square I did this by lying it face down on a bit of wood with a hole drilled for end of the pivot wire. Then looking down from above I lined up the other hole by sight, holding it with the point of a needle file while s
    6 points
  31. The Project Inspired by pictures of the Model Rail Sentinel Shunters in unusual locations a few years ago, and by the stories of ‘extreme ironing’ during the 2000s (underwater, atop mountains, on boats etc), my mind wandered to how I could contribute to getting model railway equipment in interesting locations. No content with just photographing, I was determined to go one further and run a locomotive as well. Unlike a robust ironing board, modern models are inherently delicate, and do not naturally lend themselves to the knocks and bangs of travel. Undeterred however, and for reasons of g
    6 points
  32. Clare station was built in the bailey of Clare Castle (you could do that kind of thing in 1865!) and the castle motte is still present behind the goods shed. I don't have the space to model the whole mound but need to try to make something that gives the right feeling. There needs to be a bit of forced perspective going on too which complicates things. This section of the aerial photograph gives some idea of the scale of the real thing. To those who have visited over the last few years it will be clear that there are a lot more bushes and trees on the mound now than in 1947.
    6 points
  33. Following the debacle mentioned in the previous blog entry, 5MT 73049 has now been paired with the correct type of tender. The route I went down was to buy a second hand Bachmann model of 73049 itself, what I should have done in the first place, but since I'd already gone to the trouble of weathering and renumbering the original loco, I decided to swap the tender from the new model and use the old tender and new model (do keep up at the back there) for a future repaint and relining job into BR black. An additional consideration was that the BR green lining wasn't as finely applied on the new 7
    6 points
  34. The Sharpie is indeed used for removing the bright shiny finish of the wheel rims, and the coupling rods, too. I have found in the past that airbrushed paint on these bare metal surfaces can rub off too easily, and even flake off if applied too thickly. I read, many years ago somewhere, that this could be prevented by blackening the surfaces before applying the paint. At the time I didn't fully understand the term, 'blackening', and used a marker pen. That looked blue to me, rather than black (yes, I did use a black marker!) so immediately rejected the idea. If I now work on something with br
    6 points
  35. Westown - Heathfield Having come back to modelling after a long absence, this has been a learning experience. I’m not aiming for perfection; I want the layout and individual settings to look plausible at a macro level. “I do enjoy making a miniature world where trains go to and fro” I wanted to capture the sense of place and settings of my home county Somerset; set in the context of the railways I knew and loved as a child. I wanted to engage my 6 grandchildren in the building and operations as much as possible. I’d done this with my 3 children 30 years
    6 points
  36. With my initial success of my high lighting mast under my belt I set forth today to install a lot more lighting. I wanted the lighting under the bridge to represent sodium lighting which is typical of the prototype so installed a couple of LEDs in there and did my best to cover up the wiring from view. (yellow lights installed in under bridge) So far so good. Next was the Linkspan proper. I wanted white light on this as looking at prototype night shots from Dover it's all white lighting on the linkspans to give the best light in these dangerous areas.
    5 points
  37. This weekend was a chance to finish off painting the asphalt and to make a start on getting all the road lining and decals down. Ferry terminals seem to be covered with white yellow and red lining of different sorts so out with the acrylic pens and bendy ruler to start marking it all on. (marking on the top road lines first using the bendy ruler for the corners.) (I then marked out a chevron where the two routes split before marking the lines down the ramp.) The ramp road crosses the railway at the bottom. Due to the dockside industrial nature I
    5 points
  38. A Euston bound Express passes Linslade. A diverted Midland service for Sheffield crosses from the Down Slow to Down Fast Line at the north end at Watford, after providing a connection into the St. Albans Abbey branch. Harrow. Looking south. The southern approaches, outside the Box at Watford. Waiting to leave the Reversing Sidings at Harrow after the southbound Bakerloo service has vacated Platform 2. The first glimmer of light on an overcast November Sunday morning. Pas
    5 points
  39. A K's cast white metal kit for LNWR 'Problem' class 2-2-2 "Lady of the Lake". Retrieved from the fabled Round Tuit box and still on the vacuum-packed cards. Silly me, I've fixed the footplate before fitting the driving wheels, so this is going to be fun. One of the bearings still needs opening up with the broach, but has twice come unglued from the chassis. The tender is going together slowly: I'm fitting a Tenshodo spud bogie with about the right wheel spacing. The wheels themselves are a bit undersized, but once the bogie is in place the tender sits level. Whether it will have the oomp
    5 points
  40. It's been a few days since I last posted but progress have been steady. I've been focusing on completing the das clay roadway around the Dock area. More rolling between balsa formers to get the right depth before smoothing off with a shaping tool. (rolling out the das clay to correct depth and standard width before laying on a pva layer) There was a lot of cutting and shaping the clay to get it around lots of tricky corners. (all the clay in but looking a bit rough.) Once dried I sanded down the clay to get rid of the
    5 points
  41. A bit out of sequence this, back in lockdown #1 I realised that the cardboard Scalescenes hardstanding/inset track was just not going to work in the long term. It was uneven and was already starting to get damaged by track cleaning etc. So there was nothing else to do but rip it up and get the DAS clay out. Chris Nevard eat your heart out LOL Top surface cut back, I kept most of the surrounding card as it was just the running surfaces that I needed to replace. DAS mostly applied First go with some grey emulsion. Still g
    5 points
  42. Another update that got missed during the summer. Following on from the success with the MERG electronics I looked at tidying up the wiring of the pushbuttons with another new PCB. JLCPCB again came up trumps and even managed to produce plated through slots for the switches to solder to. A quick before and after, much better I think Then I thought about the need for a variable supply for the LED lighting - I'd used Black Cat Technologies dimming units before connected to the DCC bus. I thought it was time I had my own so I came up with this: It
    5 points
  43. I was pleased to get a comment from Mikkel on the subdued colours I had used on the engine shed. Despite not achieving his amazing standards I thought I would share how I do it. Subdued colours are something I am aiming for on the layout as I always like the layouts with subdued colours at shows. On the engine shed I used The Gimp to subdue the colour of the printed Scalescenes Red Brick, however on the other areas and all over the rest of the layout I use pastels. I have two sets that I rely on: The Black to White set is from a high street branch of The Works having s
    4 points
  44. Richard of a Far North Line fame on here recently detailed a number of GBL static Black 5 models. I must say I was inspired to have a go myself at a quick project. It's not all beer and Ivatt 2MTs on the 46444 workbench. The GBL Black 5 is ultimately a copy of the Hornby Black 5. This was confirmed when a spare Hornby Black 5 fall plate literally fell into place when I fitted it. With the GBL model I removed the cabside number with T-Cut and a cotton bud. Then I sprayed in the smokebox, tender chassis and cab roof to
    4 points
  45. It's a heavy goods loco in this episode of Sudrian Spotlight, 8F No.802 'Indomitable'. Thought it's a pretty basic customisation, I think it has a certain presence...
    4 points
  46. A full story for this subject - I remembered to take photographs with my newly serviced camera while doing it. The plan is to weather it in a used but serviced condition, working from a photograph in a book from my reference library. I'll be using a selection of materials from my usual stock and will hopefully remember to introduce them as the steps progress. Being a small engine it sits quite comfortably on the painting turntable. Are you sitting comfortably? Then I'll begin . . . . . . . What might we use a Sharpie for?
    4 points
  47. Nothing particularly novel in all this but I've designed a jig which suited my purpose of mass producing blocks of varying width and constant height. The original technique came from Physicsman as used for his Fell walls on Kirkby Luneside 1/2. The materials used were: The base - a piece of laminated chipboard with a high quality relatively smooth finish. This is important because then the clay in the template mold doesn't stick and can be easily lifted out once cast but still wet. The sides - strips of plastic venetian blind slats, 3mm thick, UPVC filled with calcium car
    4 points
  48. I know of three models of the WC&PR, one each in O and OO gauge feature on here. Both have detailed and excellent representations of Clevedon Station and yards and Ullypug's Weston Ashcombe Road teminus which I know very well was captured with great accuracy. This left me very little incentive to try and capture any part of WC&PR in a layout, the bar having being set so high already. I decided instead to go in depth with the rolling stock from the last three years 1937 -1940 before closure. It narrowed the field down substantially while leaving me interesting research to co
    4 points
  49. It's been a little while since I last posted. I've been concentrating on getting the sea finished. Eventually after 48hrs the PVA dried. Now for the fun part of tacky glue and making some wavy texture. (Dock ready for texturing) Put an angle on it to make it look like the breeze is blowing across the Dock. The glue holds its shape pretty well and with the aid of a cocktail stick I could get rid of the bubbly bits and make it more wavy. I did two treatments of this to infill between rows. (second row complete and left to dry)
    4 points
  50. I'm a real fan of the Oxford Rail 7 Plank RCH wagon. I realise it's not perfect but it is has a number of merits including price. I've a few of these including a couple I've weathered for my 1947 Teign Valley project. Some of them where bought with a view to repainting them into scruffy 1950's/1960's BR ex-private owner wagons. Paul Marshall Potter (PMP) on his excellent Albion Yard blog wrote an article on converting them to this state. https://albionyard.wordpress.com/2016/03/16/nine-is-the-magic-number/ One thing I liked was the use of the Modelmaster decals for ex-private wago
    4 points
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