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  1. Something a bit different a heavy fighter from the early years of WW2 - fantastic concept, let down with crap engines, if only they'd fitted it with Merlin's. Over a year in the making (though technically only took a week to build). Box Art Instructions & Colour Call out. What's in the Box. The Build part 1.. It went together well, just other projects and commissions got in the way. Roll on a year -
    41 points
  2. A bit of progress on the project. The first underframe. Relatively straightforward though I fixed it down to a flat board when soldering to prevent distortion. The kit provides for a variety of the brake systems fitted during the life of these coaches but for my period the simple westinghouse arrangement is correct. Some slight removal of the lower edge to clear the wheels on a curve, but that can’t be seen from the side. A row of bogies ready and waiting. An underframe in position, it pushes round the layo
    23 points
  3. When Hornby released their generic 4 and 6 wheeled coached I picked up a 6 wheeler to convert to an Engineer's Coach. The coach was broken down into its component parts almost immediately. I made a scratch built solebar footstep from a piece of Microstrip. This was held in place with brackets made from staples fixed into thd solebars. The original Hornby footboards had their stays removed and holes drilled for strong piano wire in their place. Recipricating holes were drilled in the floor of the coach. On the foot boards c
    22 points
  4. I've gradually been adding the remaining smaller details, which seems to take up a lot of time. This first photo shows those at the front end. The lamp on top of the smokebox was included as a "fold-up" job on the etch (similar to a typical 2mm axlebox). The handle is rather delicate and hasn't survived the process of soldering it together, but I don't think you can see it well anyway. I will make the lens using PVA glue after painting. The smokebox door handles are made from etched handrail knobs, while the smokebox hinge is made from some bits of scrap nickel silver. The "taps" beneath the s
    19 points
  5. I have now made all four underframes. Perhaps not in itself blogworthy, but I thought I’d share a bit of silly video. No couplings so I can’t pull them round, but with bit of tape to stop the buffer bodies locking I can do a push test. I’m happy with the way they move, the bogies do seem to follow the rail well. The buffers are made up, but a few tests needed to ensure I get them just where they can spring correctly. Electric lighting for railway coaches was very new in 1905. Seems a shame not to have a go at some realistic lighting on the
    17 points
  6. Something a bit different, the Seafang, the planned replacement for the Seafire - which due to the Jet Age, became an interim (and mostly) forgotten foot note in British Naval aviation history. Then Trumpeter created a kit of it (along with the Spiteful). I've had it my stash for a while and I wanted a quick build.. Box Art What's in the box.. The decals came back to haunt me. The build.. As with most Trumpeter kits, the
    17 points
  7. Another update. The platform buildings and footbridge is now complete. All that is needed now is to create the links with my loft runaround scheme. The followings pics are all early BR. # I very much doubt that 46151 ever hauled the Thames Clyde Express, however, other members of the class did work it North of Leeds.
    17 points
  8. Adding some details After a rather intensive period of model building, I’ve slowed down a little, while other activities have called for my attention. The train of early Broad Gauge vehicles, including the Posting Carriage etc. still raise a smile as I pass by them on their shelf. They are, however, still waiting for their engine, so I need to press on with my ‘Fire Fly’ class model. my three recent GWR Broad Gauge models I always find that momentum is easily lost, once the main structures have been completed and several major design problems have been
    17 points
  9. A year or two ago I acquired four kits for S&DJR six-wheeled vehicles from the Connoisseur Models range of 4mm "Pocket Money" models. These kits were reduced from the 7mm vehicles in the main Connoisseur range and judging by the packing on mine, date from the 90s. An evening's work saw the main body put together without too much difficulty. Although I have a rolling bar, I'd misplaced it, so all curves were formed by gentle finger pressure. Once completed, I then found the offending rolling bar! The remaining folds were done with a Hold'n'Fold tool.
    17 points
  10. First off I must apologize for the long delay in posting a blog, the truth is that for the time being at least, I cannot spend as much time as I'd like on model railway's. Therefore, after what seems like an eternity, here's part three of 'De Snitzlton'. This blog covers the design and construction of a trailing bogie / pony which I considered a last resort 'steam assisted uncoupler' method as I much preferred the original design that featured in Part 1, but this design failed to deliver. This blog also illustrates the construction and wiring of the locomotive to run on DCC. What i
    17 points
  11. Hi all, As we ease ourself into a BH weekend just to let you know that Kyle will be attending the RAILEX virtual show tomorrow Saturday 29th May 2021. The layout was lined up to attend the original show but will appear at a date to be confirmed when some sense of normality returns. Meantime, I was honoured to be asked to be part of the virtual show and details can be found here: http://www.railex.org.uk/index.php On my layout page there will be a selection of Chris Nevard photos in addition to a short video that I shot espec
    13 points
  12. I've been doing a number of projects over the last month. More on the etches for the 4mm J17 and also playing with the electronics for my level crossing. Meanwhile as a more practical modeling activity I've made a start on the shed which is my 16mm photo plank project. The sides of the shed were laser cut in 6mm and 3mm ply. I've deliberately made the back wall in two parts to give me some reasonable thickness for the wall. I have just sanded the outside and have the option to produce an outer shell in the event that I want to include the shed as part of a layout in future.
    11 points
  13. This short video was created as my entry for the Risborough & District virtual Railex 2021
    10 points
  14. The Brede tramway only had one locomotive, a pony substituted for it when the locomotive was out of service for maintenance or other reasons. So I envisaged only having one locomotive in this project too. There were two obvious choices. One was to build a small Bagnall loco like the one actually used on the Brede tramway, the other was to build a model of the small Hunslets used at Deptford by the War Department and later sold to the Sand Hutton line in Yorkshire. I had better documentation in the form of drawings and photos of the Hunslets but the Bagnall design won out because I had a kit of
    8 points
  15. The Roy Link kit I am using is for 7mm scale, but I am building this small 18" gauge Bagnall to 1:32 scale, a third as big again. Because Bagnall's seemed to scale the functional parts of their locomotives to the gauge they were going to be used on, most things below the footplate don't require modification, and nor do the functional bits, such as boiler, firebox and water tank. The human bits do, so the cab has to be higher, some of the controls - handbrake in particular - need to be upsized, and because humans don't like coal smoke in their faces, the 1:32 model requires a much taller funnel
    7 points
  16. Well, as ever with these things, family and work life have got in the way of the pleasurable hobbies, so time has been limited, but I have turned my attention to baseboards, how best to make them and how to store them. Yes, it sounds like the start of one those 'Baseboards for Dummies' books! Open-top, open-plan baseboard I have done baseboards in the past, the quick and simple way, some 2" x 1" framing to give a study frame, then ply or chipboard on top. They have worked fine, but are not exactly lightweight and definitely fall into the 'flat-earth' category, in that you can
    6 points
  17. So, what have I been up to, well lots actually but sadly not on the railway so finally I'm getting back to regular modelling. We have heard so much news in the world I'm only going to talk models here. My last entry showed progress on a Metcalfe models Town End Cottage - something I started during lock down and got quite a lot of satisfaction from. I have tried to add as much extra detailing as I can and when it was completed I decided to try another, and another! I'm telling myself these are temporary until I get around to scratch building something in the future but I must admit that fo
    6 points
  18. Hello all, After nearly two years of messing about with coarse scale O gauge, I finally saw the light last night and ordered a SECR D class from Rails of Sheffield. But of course, it needs a layout! The layout is set in a big town along the SECR, or at least one large enough to warrant a D class. The town is situated near Toad Hall, so often gets some unusual motorcars arriving via LNWR motorcar carrying vans from Liverpool, with their contents destined for the Hall. I decided to base the layout here as Wind in the Willows is what initial
    6 points
  19. I'd spent a fair amount of time trying to solder up a belpaire firebox and despite many attempts I really wasn't that happy with the results. So, as much as an intellectual exercise as with any practical expectation of success, I thought I'd try and model the firebox, boiler and smokebox up in CAD and try to print it. This is very much a 'work in progress' but the results are rather encouraging. The layer lines at a .03mm layer height are virtually invisible to my eye and will disappear even further under a coat of paint. t. I was astonished by how well the rivets aroun
    6 points
  20. This is a early version sketch of a Barry H class. There are some puzzles. Photos appear to show a much narrower dome than the various weight diagrams, Barry and GW, which I've tried to reproduce. More problems come from the underframe being in shadows on most photographs. No brakes shoes on the leading driving wheel, and although I've drawn them the same, I have a suspicion the brake gear on the second pair of drivers was different to the other two. Finally the best profile shot of the L/H side of a locomotive I found shows a very prominent injector (I think) with a large diameter pipe leadin
    5 points
  21. First step - a plan. Following in others' footsteps is a great help especially when they share their resources. So I have Diagrams of the LSWR saloon (1869- remodelled 1889) and a 4 compartment coach both in the 24' 6" length of #17. Ratio 612 (a Diag. U4; 26' 10" composite) is a suitable starting point, the main issues being to shed the extra width of the First Compartments and create the central saloon. Unlike #15 where saloon had its own entrance and no thoroughfare, #17 had access from the compartments at each end as per #1520 on the Bluebell Railway LSWR 1520
    5 points
  22. I have recently replaced the platform lights hopefully giving more of a western region feel. The post was cut from cardboard repurposed from old sketchbooks. I have found this material gives a good representation of the concrete used for these 1940/50's lamp posts. The lamp fitting was turned out of some laminated plastikard, mounted in a mini drill and turned to shape. A small piece of brass wire creates the fitting . The post is painted a humbrol wood colour and weathered with powders to create the concrete look. The previous lamp posts were revamped
    5 points
  23. I’ve added a selection of horse droppings to the road and yard on “The Stables”. Obviously, prototype research was needed first! Period photos from the 1890s-1930s often show droppings in the street, especially where horse-drawn carriages were regularly parked. "Bicycle couriers with copies of the Manchester Guardian, which are being delivered to Euston station in London for circulation, circa 1920." Getty Images, embedding permitted. Droppings can sometimes be seen strung out, as seen below. I assume that’s because the “action” happened while the ho
    5 points
  24. Hi all Well what it is to be back earlier than anticipated, after amazing support from my local NHS all's well. I have spent much time thinking and planning my next moves on the layout. I quickly realised that finishing the clear out in the garage needed to be a priority and so I have started making more room thanks to some garden storage boxes I have installed in an unused area beside the house. I have also resumed work on Northumberton Station building which is based on Acklington Station. Based on the Metcalfe cottages I built I am reducing the amount of interior detail planned
    4 points
  25. These were a version of the J class with a larger bunker, but I found more subtle differences than I expected. Again its very heavily indebted to the excellent WRRC volume on the Rhymney. This sketch represents a locomotive rather earlier in its career than the J class sketch, with the rather unusual long brass number plate. Note that this one has Ramsbottom safety valves rather than the pop valves on the J. There was a horrific accident with one of these locomotives where a fitter reassembled the Ramsbottom valves incorrectly and locked them tight so they could not release.
    3 points
  26. Hello all, I have in recent past been wondering how bad it was for the engines to be stood on these sometimes very inhospitable piers, which invariable at times had spray wafting over them. But that is not really the point of this post. The point is, what shall the passenger train terminating at West Drizzlington consist of? Due to the confines of the layout its operating potential would be severely impaired if two Bachmann SE&CR birdcages coaches were used as was recommended to me by @Edwardian, and the normal consist of three would not be usable. So the onl
    3 points
  27. As mentioned on my layout thread I have been distracted by another loco project with a Hornby class 56 that Will had modified to fit a new cab so that it has two different ends. It will eventually be finished in Transrail branded Dutch (with white numbers at one end and black at the other). My work so far: Minor chassis repairs Fitting of Extreme Etchings horn grills (with a different version at each end) Extreme Etchings jacking point covers Replica high intensity headlight (at one end only) BR built windscreen (EE etch) fitted to the new end
    3 points
  28. Another one for my new scrapyard micro layout. I wanted to try and repllicate something of the effects on the loco in the prototype photo in my previous Ruston weathering blog entry, with faded paint and overall dirt. The buffer beams were painted in parts with an orangey-red to represent patch painting of red oxide. The entire body was given a wash of the ink that I mentioned last time and this was given a couple more washes over the fuel tank. The RUSTON plate on the front is etched nickel silver, from Judith Edge kits. The roof and wheels were painted usi
    3 points
  29. Hi all, I've been thinking about getting some more variety with Loco Coal wagons. There is the Coopercraft and Cambrian 10 ton wagons, a Cambrian 40 ton and nothing great in between. Dapol do several wagons liveries as loco coal, but none are spot on. Shapeways do 3d prints of two types, including an N28 body to go on a Dapol underframe. But the underframes were out of stock when I last looked... You can make an N27 body by taking 2 Dapol bodies and putting the fixed end from one where the other has a door end. A bit wasteful, but it then gives me a spare underframe f
    3 points
  30. Following my recent post about research into the ‘Fire Fly’ class engines, @Mikkel remarked “I was wondering when and why Gooch abandoned the Haycock firebox for his own round topped version, e.g. on the Pyracmon class.” my model of ‘Tantalus’ It reminded me that, when I was preparing my model of ‘Tantalus’, one of Gooch’s ‘Standard Goods’ engines, I had collected together a number of drawings by G F Bird of various engines from this class and its immediate predecessors. Taken together, they serve to illustrate the line of development from the very first
    3 points
  31. I like urban buildings and I’m slowly constructing some of the Scalescenes range in N for use on my formative layout, but I’m not getting on too well with cardboard, so I’ve bought the fire station and I’m translating it into plastic card. The brick bond isn’t right, but it’s all I’ve got and you can’t see that easy at NVD. Van for scale and fitting test, I don’t have a fire engine yet. One thing I really need to do is to settle on a time period... but then I have 3 x green diesels and 1 large logo and 1 blue, so that’s a couple of decades...
    3 points
  32. Things have moved on a bit since the last update. The body fabrication has been completed and the base coat of satin black applied. Buffer beams repainted (which are Hornby class 31 for info) and the body fittings replaced. Nothing left now other than tackle the lining The chassis has also had black paint applied to the fabricated bits and so I could do an (almost) final assembly the cylinders had their red lining applied and satin varnished. Just need to get a Zimo sound decoder and 9F sounds before hard wring it all in. Last thing I indulged myself in a pretty
    3 points
  33. In between, many, many commissions I've been build this beast of a kit and unlike a certain Revell Corvette, it doesn't need wrestling in to submission! It's not a huge part count, but is exquisite in it's detail. Box Art Very Matchbox in the box art. Instructions, etc. The Sprues (only 4) The Build The Hull dry fitted together. Very important - have the deck
    2 points
  34. A start on the transfers highlighted an error in my painting, with the yellow extending slightly too far on the cantrail. The orange cantrail still needs to be extended around the cab roof (but this will be painted rather than transfers, and the transfers for the number haven’t worked too well and will need removing and reapplying with new transfers as there is far too much backing film showing. However it’s nice to see the Transrail logos on. Onto the other side… edit: a little more work last night got the roof corrected and the other sides transfers added.
    2 points
  35. ...or something to that affect. Hello all, While I was not whitewashing anything recently, I have done a good but of track painting. Or I was until I ran out of brown paint, and as it’s Memorial Day today none was to be had. However the results so far are looking quite good, especially as this is only the second time I have ever painted track. Although I know now that it should really be done once the track is glued or pinned down permanently. A cutting has also been made in the hill for the street to pass through. This was done using my
    2 points
  36. This EFE bus was bought second hand for £10. Whilst being a reasonably accurate representation, the gloss finish looked hideous. The first job was to dismantle it entirely. The model is held together with three rivets. The front two rivets were removed by melting the plastic heads with a soldering iron. The rear rivet was drilled out, taking care not to remove too much material as the platform would be damaged. The interior seating was painted and hand painted Preiser figures added. I replaced the grab rail on the platform with 0.9mm brass wire, as the EFE rail was t
    2 points
  37. One of the more iconic features of Romford station are the overbridges. Bridge 102A (footbridge) was built in 1893 to link the Great Eastern Station to the London Tilbury & Southend Station. Bridge(s) 102 (Main and Electric lines) were built in 1931 as part of the four tracking and replaced the original brick arch structure, albeit some of the abutments were reused. I managed to ascertain the span length from scale drawings that I had acquired. The depth of the main girders was calculated from counting bricks on the adjacent abutments. The main web plates were constructed from 0.5m
    2 points
  38. The balance of the #15 build project was adding the various roof and piping accessories and the access steps. WC&PR having mostly railside stops these were an essential. Moving on to #16, a five compartment all Second also ex LSWR. The dimensions of the Parkside/Ratio GWR Kit 610 differ slightly but are near enough for my needs, hence the build was nothing remarkable. Here it is shown with the seating and the typical "open window" settings as usually seen when in operation. This is now on hold while I move on to #17 which requires major Cut and Shut surgery.
    2 points
  39. The great thing about the Roy Link Bagnall kit chassis is that it works just as well for a 1:32 Bagnall Sipat as it does for a 7mm scale 7" Bagnall. That is to say that the wheel diameters and spacing, the length and width and the positioning of things like cylinders, smokebox and cab are the same, give or take a millimetre for both. However, as with the 7" Bagnall, the valve gear is a little bit of a mystery. Bagnall's had their own patented valve gears, first the Baguley gear, and then the Bagnall-Price valve gear. What's supplied in the kit doesn't appear to be either but as part of the gea
    2 points
  40. As I noted here the two quickest wins amongst the possible coach projects were commissioning the Bachmann Mk1 BSK and upgrading the old Lima Mk1 SK - since those two projects didn't require me to do a complete paint job. So upgrading the Lima Mk1 it was. And after getting a fair way with painting the SK interior (along with all the other interiors) the penny dropped that I had two Replica TSO interiors in the coach box, and conversion to a TSO should therefore simply be a matter of swapping interior mouldings and painting . So I did just that - the Replica interior fits witout an
    2 points
  41. Peckett George Jennings of the South Western Potteries, Parkstone, Poole This is the start of the building of a working diorama of the pottery factory end of the line on two 42"x13.5" lightweight ply boards. Some progress, A bargain from Rails of Sheffield has arrived, a set of plates are on order from Narrow Planet. A cast brass dome and valves from RT Models await fitting as do couplings. It will be repainted and finished as George Jennings. An 'Anyrail' trackplan has been drawn by Brian, this was done to prove the trackplan was possible with standard
    2 points
  42. A couple of dry evenings has resulted in a lot of progress on 37065, which has now been fully resprayed into Mainline livery (using Rainbow Railways acrylic Mainline Blue, Model Air Grey Black for the roof and a mix of Model Air chrome yellow and Model Colour golden yellow for the ends. After a coat of gloss varnish, Fox transfers were used for the body strip and silver numbers, it is an odd sheet as it includes numbers for all classes, two sets of stripes, but they sell different packs for different classes with the different sized Mainline logos (it turned out mine was for a 73 which we
    2 points
  43. I have long thought that if you stare at a problem for long enough the solution will eventually arrive all by itself. On this occasion the problem was how to accurately build the framework for the end windows and the time thinking about it was considerable! The solution was satisfyingly low twch and obvious. The little montage should show my basic but effective jig and if I had thought it was going to work so well I would have used a better bit of wood. As it was, I stuck the plan view of the end onto the bit of 2x1 and drilled a snug fit hole for each of the uprights which were 1.5mm square b
    2 points
  44. A relatively calm day before the storm has allowed me to further refine the layout. For some time the drawbridge giving me access to the shed without having to learn to limbo was causing me issues with track, and current reliability, so I bit the bullet (I do like chomping down on ordnance it seems...) and screwed it down. The height of the layout - sort of nipple height - means I don't have to bend too much to get in and I thought it a reasonable sacrifice for better running. The drawbridge had caused me problems when setting out the fiddle yard, as I tried to avoid any pointwork where the
    2 points
  45. From my notebook... ...dimensions and cutting notes (on the small lathe) for signal lamps, based on GWR drawings reproduced in Adrian Vaughan's 'Great Western Signalling". The lamps are bored out 3mm to house a 3mm water clear LED. Although not common, I sourced some flangeless LEDs (Toby Electronics - Toby.co.uk) which will fit right into the lamp case, leaving only the clear base of the LED to be painted and stop light spillage. The lamp is cross drilled to take the front and rear lenses which are thick walled brass tube, turned down at the ends to fit the cross drilled ho
    2 points
  46. Over the last couple of years I have made a fair number of wagons, still not enough but I can now run fairly representative goods services. However folk may have noticed that the passengers are poorly served by just two rakes of coaches, and both of those are a bit shorter than they ought to be. So time for a bit of coachbuilding. The Grampian Corridor Stock, built 1905 was really the CRs finest. Large proportions, very comfortable with great attention to ride and insulation, electrically lit and with corridor connections. A successful design, and as more were built their use was e
    2 points
  47. Over the last week I been able to build up the road surface around the level crossing and but in the Sculptamold between the road and river. I also 3D printed some picket fencing and the wicket gates for the crossing and fastened these in place. The overall effect doesn't look too bad. But then I looked back the the river and saw that what had initially looked like a perfect pour of Woodland scenics 'deep water' now looked horrible! I think the issue was that I poured one layer, realised I didn't have enough resin, ordered some more and pour a second layer about 2 week
    2 points
  48. Over the last couple of days I managed to get a coat of primer followed by a coat a Stratford's finest black. This was a heavy freight locomotive and getting towards the end of its life so I've got a fair bit of weathering to apply. On most of the prototype photographs it is almost impossible to see the BR insignia on the tender! I've noticed I also need to paint the bolt ends on the brake-gear. I'm very pleased with the way the different components came together. The footplate had lots of additional bits required to fill in the space left by the original splash
    2 points
  49. Here's another contribution to the RMweb "Horse Drawn Weekly" as Dave calls it. My efforts don't even get close to his superb models, but a horse is a horse as they say in Farthing. Today's subject is a wagon from Ratkin & Son, makers of finest jams and marmalades (or so they claim). The build was inspired by scenes such as this one, showing the GWR sidings at Henley and Sons cyder works (sic) in Newton Abbot, October 1908. Source: Getty Images. Embedding permitted. https://www.gettyimages.ca/photos/cider-gwr?phrase=cider%20gwr&sort=mostpopular#license
    2 points
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