Jump to content
Non-Gold users will see a video pop-up ad on most screens. This is a test. It should not appear on mobiles etc. ×

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 18/09/21 in Blog Comments

  1. I was wondering about that difference in the raves. The one on the tippler has the planks fitted close together, which I don't recall seeing so often. Perhaps for a finer size of coke? Anyway, a search for Bradwell Wood led me to the D299 thread - I should have known that such a good photo wouldn't have escaped that thread. https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/113035-more-pre-grouping-wagons-in-4mm-the-d299-appreciation-thread/&do=findComment&comment=3770771 PS: I also searched for "coke raves", but that led to a whole different ball game! I expect Google will start serving me adverts for Ibiza now.
    7 points
  2. You mentioned nuts. I did a test build of a DD3 tank wagon in 4mm for Taff Vale Models and made one or two additions including nuts on the end of the diagonal braces. I used 16BA nuts. I have attached a picture and leave you to judge their suitability. The diagonal brace is 0.5mm nickel silver rod so the nut slips easily over th end, held with a minute dab of glue. There should be two but my supply of nuts is low so I economised. The second, lock nut, would have been thinner, so just file it down. Unfortunately, 16BA nuts are like hens' teeth at the moment but when they become available again, would someone please let me know??
    7 points
  3. Excellent work Mikkel, the wagons look great and thanks for the link to my 7mm efforts If you want to have a go fading the writing on Slaters wagons with a fibreglass brush, paint the sides with varnish first and allow to dry. The varnish seals the lettering in place, but the fibreglass bristles wear this away very progressively and allow some subtle distressing/fading. Best wishes Dave
    7 points
  4. You could always bring the rake of 7mm versions along for the weekend as well, Sherton would welcome an S&D excursion train
    6 points
  5. We are there with John Greenwood's Wadebridge and Padstow, looking forward to being out and about again, it's been a long time. Cheers Jerry
    6 points
  6. The Getty photograph of Bradwell Wood wagon was featured in a book on the NLR published jointly by the National Railway and Science Museums in 1979. It doesn't mention who took the photograph only that they were official NLR ones. Close up of the wagon brings many features including both square nuts as well as hexagonal ones on the solebars together. The corner plates and other ironwork have a variety of coach bolts some with washers behind but the majority without. I know this would be difficult to achieve in 4mm scale but I model in 7mm and try to include them when ever possible.
    6 points
  7. I enjoyed it too! There's already a video from the exhibition online, Sherton Abbas is at 30:16 (and Modbury at 6:40).
    5 points
  8. Let's just hope it doesn't spill over into violence between the reds and the greys.
    5 points
  9. Dave, really looking forward to Uckfield - I’m there too with Modbury, so if Edwardian GWR is your thing then it’s going to be a good show Ian
    5 points
  10. 5 points
  11. It also features in G.F. Chadwick, North Staffordshire Wagons (Wild Swan, 1993) as an example of a PO wagon based on the Knotty. A very similar wagon from the same firm can be seen in the southbound goods and mineral train in this film shot at Bushey on the LNWR main line in 1897: https://player.bfi.org.uk/free/film/watch-railway-traffic-on-the-lnwr-1897-online Screen shot: And another in this northbound goods train on the Midland main line passing the scene of the Wellingborough accident of 2 September 1898: So, one of the better-documented PO wagons of the late 1890s!
    5 points
  12. On the subject of nuts and bolts, I came across this photo. Apart from the general delight of the scene: If you enlarge it (or click here), it's a good clear photo of the nuts (or whatever the term would be) that extend at the ends from the interior diagonals. Again there seem to be variants of this. Source: Getty images, embedding permitted. Large image.
    5 points
  13. Heh, well, Compound the triang/Hornby versions have been battered into shape by dedicated modellers over the years. However I see they go on ebay for more than I'm building these for. I thought about it in the past and decided that getting it right from the start was actually the simpler option. Cheers Mikkel. There is a photo in the carriage book that shows them, but it is from an oblique angle and has a bit of reflection on it. So I scanned it in and messed about in Affinity for a while but couldn't get it to look right. So I hit the net, lion rampant with laurel leaves sinister. Oddly the best that came up was actually a crochet pattern. Really. So I threw that into Affinity and messed about. After a lot of changes it ended up as the image you see there, printed out on matte photo paper and stuck behind the glazed window. So if anyone is making some GCS I'd happily send them the print file. all 18.4 MB of it ......
    5 points
  14. I like that you have gone the extra mile in detailing these, very nice. John
    5 points
  15. Some more shots of BATH GREEN PARK station
    4 points
  16. As promised here is the photo. The black wagon on the right is the POW sides kit, the wagon on the left is the transfer only. Although I can tell the transfer has given way, I doubt any casual observer would know. It just looks distressed / tatty / woe begone! I have added a general layer of dirt to “enhance “ the used look!
    4 points
  17. No need for forgiveness Stephen, your insights are always useful and I’m delighted you think Sherton is “close to perfection” The posters I used on the layout were just resized images that I found trawling the internet for “Edwardian Advertisements.” It’s highly likely that some off these were from period magazines rather than typical station posters. Alternatively we could just assume that colour posters were reserved for the more important places and monochrome was used to save costs in provincial backwaters like Sherton Abbas Definitely not suitable for viewing by the more politically correct members of the public at model railway exhibitions!
    4 points
  18. Hi Ian, yes I'm really looking forward to finally seeing Modbury Two Edwardian GWR layouts in one exhibition, the crowds will be at fever pitch! BW Dave
    4 points
  19. Lots to enjoy in the Deutches Museum, Mikkel, including these:
    4 points
  20. Yes, the detail and sharpness is spectacular. Some seem to be part of a set/collection, but details of the photographer(s) are scarce. The wagons in these photos seem surprisingly clean, e.g. in the image below. I suppose it could be that the coal dust and dirt does not show up in photos. Sometimes my weathered stock appears cleaner in photos than in reality. Source: Getty images, embedding permitted. Full size image here.
    4 points
  21. "That's one of the great things about modelling, every build is an entry point to railway history. " ... and that's my thinking, too There's so much to learn about how things were done from a simple open wagon. Even things like standardised nuts and bolts that we now take for granted took a while to evolve.
    4 points
  22. Thanks for all your help with this Stephen, that and the D299 thread is an ongoing source of learning for me. Regarding the nuts at the ends, they only really show in photos – and even there not very visibly. Outside of the camera I struggle to see them at all. If the rest of a wagon build has a similar level of detail it makes sense to include them, but in my case it’s somewhat inconsistent: In other areas I have approached these wagons quite pragmatically, e.g. with little detailing of the brake gear, retaining the rather thick small lettering, not fitting chains for the end door, etc. This has made me realize that I need to establish some sort of hierarchy for my wagon detailing efforts, to avoid too many inconsistencies. E.g.: 1. Interior planking 2. Interior ironwork 3. Detailed running gear 4. Fine Lettering 5. Etc…? I can then decide where to make my cut-off point. Aha, hadn't seen that, very useful. The Ayres lettering seems to be available as separate transfers from Powsides, the question of course is whether they would fit the Hornby wagons. I wonder if the Weedon wagon lettering has slipped when making the transfers, or been compressed somehow. If you look at the original Powsides graphic representation, that lettering is lower: https://www.powsides.co.uk/search.php/Weedon? Interesting. Doesn't look too difficult to replicate that livery, I have one of the HMRS transfer sheets with various large types of lettering. The central one seems to have shaded letters, the others not. The plan was to focus on local traders in order to indicate the geography of Farthing, but I can see I may need to throw in some colliery company wagons.
    4 points
  23. I’ve got two Holtons wagons from POW. One was a kit in Black, the other I bought only the transfers and put them onto a Red Oxide painted wagon. I made the mistake of trying to hand paint varnish over the top….. it’s now a distressed wagon! I’ve just been looking on the website at some of the Reading based coal merchants, there are some more possibilities for me there…. Particularly Toomer whose office is at the end of the turntable at Henley. I also had a look at one of your scratch built horse drawn delivery vans. Amazing work.
    4 points
  24. Looking good. Now I have no choice but to retrofit the big nuts on all my Gloucester wagons... I very much doubt any C&G Ayres mineral wagon was used for furniture - they were coal merchants on a large scale, as the size of their fleet indicates. There's a little essay about them by Keith Turton on Warwickshire Railways from which I learned that the green and yellow livery dates from 1910 - which skewered my Hornby upgrades, at least for my c. 1902 purposes - while the red goes back to broad gauge days. I find myself twitching about that Weedon wagon. I wonder if this is one where POWSides have used a Gloucester wagon to stand in for a wagon of some other builder. The layout of the lettering doesn't look quite right - I would expect Wallingford Watlington and Wheatley each to be written on a plank, not over the join of two planks. Unfortunately I don't have Bill Hudson's Vol. 2, which is where the Lightmoor Index tells me a photo is to be found but there is a photo of a coke wagon built by the Birmingham RC&W Co. in the HMRS collection. Anyway, as I know you know, there were plenty of dumb-buffered PO wagons still doing sterling service - there's a rather nice one from Wyken Colliery, on the LNWR Coventry-Nuneaton line, in that famous Vastern Road Yard photo! (Just to the left and down from the C&G Ayers furniture container.) Re. that container - it does look very like the ones that became widespread in the 1930s but c. 1905 there were no conflats - so presumably an ordinary low-sided open would be used. Excuse my insomniacal ramblings.
    4 points
  25. Thanks Dave. Dry-brushed Vallejo "Pale sand" works well for light weathering, I think. That and MIG "Light European Earth" pigment are used for weathering across buildings, ground and stock, in an attempt to bring things together visually.
    4 points
  26. Very elegant, Dave. I'll have to look into that technique, it clearly works very well. Those frosted glass designs are a triumph.
    4 points
  27. It is funny how you have to read something written by someone else before you can see your own mistakes. The Malm is a chest of drawers, not a bookcase. I know this, I have had it for six or seven years and I use it every day. So I have edited the post to change "bookcase" to "chest of drawers". The Train-Safe tubes are best when they contain a loco and its train. A self-contained "unit". If you put only rolling stock then it wants to surge from one end to the other as you carry the tube. If you put two or more locos next to each other in the tube and turn the controller the wrong way they will couple up and then there is a Problem. Usually I rely on one loco dragging the other out of the tube. A while ago I made a support from wood and foam to let me hold a tube on a tripod and I've added a photo of this in the blog entry above.
    4 points
  28. A reminder of the intent and a before and after. https://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/lmsparcels/h157ec466 Not quite as bought but pretty near. Ex-works condition prior to weathering and glazing. Almost there!!
    3 points
  29. I am still innocent of this particular pleasure in our hobby. I suppose, I don't use my Train-Safe tubes very much. I keep some locos and wagons on the layout to provide a core service, and use the tubes to add 'specials'. Most of these have their loco at one end. I do have one tube with the five locos of the Preservation Society" inside and their reluctance to run smoothly might well be due to dirt in their tube. I am probably quite lucky because locos like my Roco S160 have so many pickups they will rarely if ever stall. Some of my tubes have only rolling stock, so I can run a 'long train' from time to time I just took a swab on the rails at the end of one tube, and retrieved two narrow black lines, one from each top corner on a rail. I'd like to try a firm but absorbent pad on the end of a long handle maybe a foot long but I haven't thought this through and as you say the middle of the tubes will be difficult. A run-through road is an interesting idea and I thought about installing a 1.2m tube as a through connection in the place of Wellwood but decided this was too limiting (I have 0.6 and 0.9m tubes as well) and a conventional baseboard was better.
    3 points
  30. I'm very much a fan of the Train-Safe tubes but I have found it troublesome to keep the rails clean deep inside them. Have you arrived at a solution? The only way I've managed so far is to push a track-cleaning car through, the kind with a pad which puts solvent (in my case isopropyl alcohol) on the rails, but I worry slightly about the effects of solvent on the tube itself. Perhaps you don't have the same problem because I use mine as a run-through road on in my fiddle-yard, so they get a lot of traffic.
    3 points
  31. 3 points
  32. I have never had to use subtefuge to get my wife to agree to visiting Venice or Padua! Train journey between by Red Arrow is so easy too! Sadly, the virus and old age makes another trip unlikely!
    3 points
  33. You could use it to make the netting on luggage racks!
    3 points
  34. My wife has a winter birthday and my first visit to Venice, a good many years ago now, was in early January to celebrate. The lagoon was still that particular entrancing turquoise but there was snow on the roofs of Santa Maria Salute and the Redentore. I did not expect to visit Venice again, at least not in the forseeable future but in fact, a few months later, I found myself using Venice as a point of entry en route to a steelworks a 100 or so kilometers north of the city - thus the need for a fully metric tape measure. It became something of a round trip, taking the midnight train from Santa Lucia down to Rome, again for work reasons, and back to UK from there. Italian railways have provided some interest over the years: I think I've covered the whole distance from Como in the north to Syracuse in southern Sicily - not all at once - including the 'Rapido', a two car express service which is shunted onto the ferry at the straights of Messina. There are some excellent railway modellers too and if I were to search here at home I could turn up a 00 gauge GWR Pannier dating to the 1950s, made by Rivarossi - not bad for its age, it was still in service on my Father's 00 layout into the 2000s.
    3 points
  35. There’s lace making on the island of Burano if that helps
    3 points
  36. I hope Dave will forgive me; I only offer the following because when something is so close to perfection one wants to see it get even closer: It seems to me that the monochrome Ewbank poster is much more in the style of a newspaper or magazine advert rather than an advertising hoarding poster. It has too much writing. Posters designers had learnt by the Edwardian period to use bold images with the minimum of verbage; I'm pretty sure such posters would be in full colour. Unfortunately the earliest Ewbank poster I can find to illustrate this dates from the 1920s or 1930s. I think the same goes for the Plantol Soap poster. Plantol Soap adverts come in an interesting variety some of which wouldn't pass muster today; others were tending to the risqué. This might be more the thing for station advertising; possibly not this or this.
    3 points
  37. Good to hear that you're getting back into the swing of things, Dave. Can I ask how you managed to get the good folk at Sherton Abbas vaccinated? I called our local clinic to enquire but they just hung up Anyway, I have been admiring the posters in the header photo. My curiosity compels me to enquire what the lady with the broom is advertising - can you recall?
    3 points
  38. Oh, very nice, especially No. 1000. Right then, here's a plan, now I just need to convince my wife:
    3 points
  39. 'Fraid so, it's an RCH 1923 specification standard design with such un-1895 profligacies as oil axleboxes and both-side brakes. Moreover, despite Oxford putting the livery of a 10 ton wagon on it, it's a 12 ton wagon. One of my bugbears. The really big lettering isn't quite the thing either. Have you got a copy of Mike Lloyd's Private Owners on the Cambrian (WRRC, 1998)? That shows that as well as the Wrexham coal field, a lot of coal coming onto the Cambrian was from the North Staffordshire coalfield. For 1895, you'll be wanting a goodly proportion of dumb buffer private owner wagons - you're only a quarter of a mineral wagon's lifetime after the introduction of the RCH 1887 specification which required sprung buffers for new construction.
    3 points
  40. I think they also partly dissolve the decal, in the case of dry print, softening it slightly so it both adheres to the surface better and fits around the 3D detail.
    3 points
  41. That would be nice to see. If you are thinking of a pre-lettered one it might be good to pick it up at a shop or their exhibition stand, if that's practical. The lettering on mine was damaged/peeling here and there, so you could pick a good one. Or alternatively get the transfer. I'm thinking of painting over the thick small lettering on the Weedon one, and replacing it with new lettering. Would give me the opportunity to add Farthing in there.
    3 points
  42. It was rather the other way round. Hornby did a beautiful rendition of the livery on their near-miss 1887 6-plank wagon, which I tried upgrading in the running gear department; this photo shows the unmodified wagon (their weathered version, from a 3-pack) posed with a suitable pre-grouping locomotive: The quality of the printing is stunning: It's a shame that Hornby have moved away from this underframe for these wagon bodies as it gave a really surprisingly good impression, albeit depending on a good deal of trompe l'oeil - the brake V-hanger is the one thing that stands out, although closer inspection reveals that the brake lever is a foot thick at the pivot! Perhaps. I did go to look when writing my post but the POWSides website isn't working for me just at the moment.
    3 points
  43. Reading you blogs is proving to be expensive in the book department as well.
    3 points
  44. Outstanding Mikkel, thank you for your write up on the extra detailing to these kits. I have enjoyed building a number of these as you know and if you do not mind would like to use some of your knowledge to detail some more of these kits. I really like your subtle weathering and the use of pigments. How do you fix the pigments please?
    3 points
  45. I think it was simply it didn’t like the varnish brushed on. It then started to craze. Spraying varnish is clearly the answer! I will add a photo next week when we are back from holiday.
    3 points
  46. Thank you Dave, your own builds were a great inspiration - as always. I did try what you describe, matt varnish to hold the transfers in place, and then light work with a fibre glass brush. But the brush seemed to tear the edges of the letters in an unsightly manner. Perhaps I need to try again, and to be more courageous. Many thanks Dave. Have a go, it felt worthwhile to me, turns the wagon into your own. That said, the interior detailing probably took 3 times as long as building up the wagons. Some might see that as defeating the purpose of the pre-painted and -lettered Powsides range, which I suppose is to get something up and running quickly. They would fit right in I think! It took me a little getting used to though: After years of seeing only the functional liveries of the railway companies on my layouts, these bright and big-lettered wagons seemed a bit out of place at first. I'm hooked now though.
    3 points
  47. Mikkel, While I understand that there are a number of unknowns concerning what the interior of those wagons should look like and no one has "signed off" on those drawings, I have to say to me those interiors just "look right." Indeed they look fantastic! Thanks for sharing and giving me some encouragement to give a similar project a go! Dave
    3 points
  48. Nicely detailed Mikkel, I think the light weathering brings out the detail. Good research behind them too.
    3 points
  49. Thanks John, I think the interior detailing is worth it for an empty wagon. Sheeting them would be a lot quicker though!
    3 points
  50. I have found all this very useful, having found the need to fit some type of auto-couplings on my 4mm/P4 shunting plank, my eyesight no longer being up to the job of using 3-links. As there was the requirement to retro-fit magnets into the track as electro-magnets were not an option, after some experimentation I have gone for the combination of 6mm x 6mm rod ones - they will just fit between the sleepers - and the 2mm mk3 S&W's. I had these for my 2mm scale modelling before deciding DG's were better in this scale so thought I'd try using them in 4mm given the size issues with even the 3mm/4mm ones. With some alteration they enable quite close coupling and look slightly less obvious. Having spent a modelling lifetime getting free running rolling stock the biggest challenge perhaps has been to make them the opposite so the S&W's work properly all the time, no random un-coupling when not wanted! What fun......but worth it in the end.
    3 points
  • Newsletter

    Want to keep up to date with all our latest news and information?
    Sign Up
×
×
  • Create New...