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Showing content with the highest reputation since 14/05/21 in Blog Comments

  1. I am impressed by your in-depth research on this subject! Vintners' Yard included a mere token representation to create the atmosphere of horse drawn traffic. Evidently, I need to spread it about more generously. Best wishes Eric
    13 points
  2. Dammit, this stuff looks so tempting. TBG, I think you're employed by the model aircraft business to infiltrate the railway modelling hobby. I hope they're paying you well because it's almost working. If it had a copper-capped chimney my last defences would crumble.
    8 points
  3. Here are some photographs of the finished main station building.
    8 points
  4. Apart from a good clean up the external build is now in the bag !
    8 points
  5. Stunning modelling and writing as usual Mikkel. A few "pointers" and responses to queries: Horses usually repeat their location for dropping manure: whether it be the same place in a stable, field or even a regular route. Seeing/smelling another horse droppings can sometimes cause a horse to produce, but of course only when it's ready - but that explains the postcard of the mews with the long line. Having the horse "produce" in the mews would be preferable to doing it en-route. You are correct on colour caused by input, and it does darken off quite quickl
    7 points
  6. Aha! What's brown and sounds like a bell? Dung!
    7 points
  7. Euphemism: it used to be "spending a penny"... for horses, only a Farthing. Kit PW
    6 points
  8. I have vague memories of my father, a keen gardener, buying sacks of manure off a chap that sold it by the bag, Delivered by horse and cart, I reckon mid 60s. Probably a business going way back to the start of gardens and allotments. There is the old story: Two men, leaning on a fence watch a horse and cart go by. The horse generates a pile of manure. Says the first " och , ye should collect that and put it yer rhubarb " ... Says the second , " nay, I always put custard on mine " ..........
    6 points
  9. Superb modeling Mikkel. Detailed research, accurate observation and clever implementation. The end result looks spot on, that really does add to the look of a working stables.
    6 points
  10. Just "dropping" in to say, in best football manager style, "the boy dung good"!
    6 points
  11. The Sabre was problematic at any height, and in the early days, the Typhoon's airframe also gave many problems - all very stressful for the MAP at the time. The Whirlwind's airframe was built around the Peregrine, which was a much smaller engine than the Merlin - so the Merlin was never an option, they were simply to big and heavy. All the time and effort went into developing the Merlins, so the Peregrine and the Whirlwind both withered on the vine. The Typhoon never made the grade as a fighter, because, quite apart from the problems with the Sabre's reliability, the Typhoon's wing was very th
    5 points
  12. I remember building a 1/72 version of that almost 60 years ago - not to that standard, though!
    5 points
  13. The more I learn, the more fascinating this topic is. Scatologists unite! I'm trying to work out how much manure a 12-stall stable block such as the one at Farthing would produce daily - and thus how many wagon loads that would amount to over time. So I found the following data for "a 1000 pound horse" on this website. Now to get the calculator out. And to look up stuff in rule books. Good grief, this is growing!
    5 points
  14. They were disinfected (with lime wash originally) and presumably a stiff broom. Whilst not pristine, I imagine that they were fairly clean for both hygienic and olfactory reasons.
    5 points
  15. You can take this sort of thing too far though, especially if you have a cavalry background, Scatalogic Rites of All Nations cropped up in project Gutenberg the other day.
    5 points
  16. Mikkel, As always your research and attention to detail is impressive and inspiring! Duncan
    5 points
  17. That it's hard to find doesn't mean you shouldn't do it. They're a mass-produced model and they're never going to increase in value so much that they'll be worth anything. We have them to enjoy them, not to look at them in a box. The scrapyard layout is in the Standard Gauge Industrial section of the forum. It's also been in the February 2020 edition of BRM.
    4 points
  18. 4 points
  19. You have made a superb model. The build and painting is superb. I am looking for some help. I am trying to create a model of GWR 1460. According to my research this engine was aquired from the B&M. It was not a classic metro tank but one that B&M asked Stephenson to copy the GWR Metro design. The B&M owned 7 or 8 of these engines but all except one was worn out by grouping. I have no idea if this loco ever run on the GWR system - but it was given a GWR number then it is a possibile. Would anyone be able to guide me on what (typically) immed
    4 points
  20. Coincidently this works out to be a FARTHING per ton per mile.
    4 points
  21. Highbridge Wharf tolls include manure at 1/6d per ton or part of a ton. This is a recreation of the board displayed on the wharf.
    4 points
  22. There are quite centrally located tanneries in Fez, Morocco - or at least there was in the 1980s. I remember wondering at the time why it had originally been placed so centrally. So I checked to see what the average weight of a GWR stable horse might be. There would be different sizes of horse, of course. Earlier I set up this photo showing some of my Dart Castings horses: Assuming that Dart have got their heights more or less correct, I checked approx. corresponding weights here: Source: https://equine-world.co.uk/info/ho
    4 points
  23. I have heard the phrase used in business circles, most memorably when a Senior Vice President (ex-Sandhurst and ex-Guards) yelled down the phone at an errant manager, "You're talking horse sh1t!" but he we are, literally not figuratively doing the very thing. I have waited 27 years for this!
    4 points
  24. "After The Lord Mayor's Show" When the parade's moved on After the crowds have gone After the last hurrah The last ta-ran-ta-ran-ta-ra! When the glory boys depart That's when the real work starts After the Lord Mayor's show comes the donkey cart I watched the marching bands I saw the children wave Now on this street I stand And it's as silent as the grave And it's time to do my dance Time to perfect my art After the Lord Mayor's show comes the donkey cart Parades will come and go Every year a new star of the show Girls scream as they go past But
    4 points
  25. Good point about the cattle docks, they do tend to look very clean. Of course the cleaning of cattle wagons was taken quite seriously, so I assume also the cattle docks? I must look in the rule books to see if there is anything on cleaning of stables. As for visible stains in period photos, one thing did occur to me: Would it show in black and white?
    4 points
  26. “In villages, the manure would have been rarer” The farm over the way from us was still using horses, I was regularly sent out with an ancient shopping bag and a small shovel, as it was excellent top dressing for dads roses. Villages usually had keen gardeners who would be on the lookout for such treats. There was a traffic on the railway from cities to farms for manure, so maybe the produce from your stables would be collected up, wheelbarrowed into a corner until there was enough to make up a wagon load, so keep busy!
    4 points
  27. Somewhere, in a box with his wings and Warrant Officer's insignia, I have my late father's copy of the Tempest V Pilot's Notes.
    3 points
  28. You've found a good image there Mikkel. Look closely at the left-most van, and you will see that it is actually a 6W (I'm pretty sure) passenger coach, with battens fitted on the inside of the windows. If we could see inside, we would find shelves for strawberry baskets, in place of seats and luggage racks. Apparently the LSWR did this with redundant ^W coaches, because they were short of vans for "the flush". Its quite a late photo, I think, post WW1, possibly even post -1923. There is another very good set of photos showing this operation pre-WW1, where all the berrie
    3 points
  29. In another topic, covering the supply and carriage of horses, I noted I'm not sure the figures add up, but with a suggestion of around 150,000 working horses in London, and one dealer handling 25,000 dead horses a year, that suggests a working life of only around three years.
    3 points
  30. Thanks for all the insights MIB. Going by the quote above, one-horse stations would have just the one pile in the same place daily then! Not much scope for BLT modellers, although of course there would be the visiting horses of coalmen and traders. And thanks Simon for finding the old post. I remember the quote by Laurie Lee, very nice. 3.5 millions horses is a lot, I see that the British Equestrian Trade Association counted 847.000 horses in 2019, with an average age of 13. They have it good nowadays! This morning - and somewhat belatedly - I found the following at the
    3 points
  31. Found it, December 2019, in Mikkel’s “Horse drawn float” blog. Simond 7,657 Posted December 22, 2019 I think life for a working horse was quite hard, and littl3 to compare with today’s horses, which are, for 5he most part, hobby animals, in a far more caring society. apart from the wagon loads of horse manure that was shipped out of big cities daily, (which has been a previous discussion in these hallowed halls) I rather suspect a fair number of beasts turned their toes (or hooves) skyward each day. Of course, the railways could afford convalescent
    3 points
  32. It certainly seems likely that there would have been a concern about the feed. We have always worried about fuel. I have been doing a bit more digging around. For the princely sum of 60p I downloaded an 1848 (sic) document from the GER Society’s website. It is a 22-page article from the Civil Engineer’s and Architect’s journal which provides data on known British goods traffic at the time. On p17 there is a short section on Manure Traffic. Significantly, manure is understood here in a broad sense and includes guano. Lime, sand and bones are also mentioned. Tonnage, rates and inco
    3 points
  33. 3 points
  34. Holy Crap, just imagine if the petrol engine hadn’t been invented - we’d all be up to our necks in it by now! Given that we are all experts on this subject in Ireland, and believe me it’s everywhere over here, the color and consistency of your version is exactly right.
    3 points
  35. No but tea. Lots of mint tea. The Penn State Uni "output" data include bedding, which is convenient. But good point about the incoming straw, must work out how much fodder and bedding came in. Ah, now that's pure gold. A quote from "London Railway Stations" by Chris Heather, on arrangements at Paddington: And later there is this: https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/902c5134-9d92-444c-a270-d27c3886dc93
    3 points
  36. Usually 4 per horse. They don't generally travel with a spare.
    3 points
  37. Well, once the stationmaster, signalman and head porter had sorted out their roses, allotment and the station flowerbeds, I reckon there would still be enough for a wagon or two every so often. Presumably they had a pit or midden, and emptied it every month or two? atb Simon
    3 points
  38. Having the output from London's huge manual work force in Victorian times helps to explain why there were dozens of stinking tanneries very close to the centre of the city, between London Bridge station and the Bricklayers Arms goods depot. If you look at the 1879 layer of the Southwark mapping service you will see them all over the place, but especially in that area. https://geo.southwark.gov.uk/connect/analyst/mobile/#/main . (Find 1879 in the 'Base Map' menu at the top right.) It was the centre of the country's leather trade, with the London Leather, Hide & Wool Exchange at its heart. T
    3 points
  39. Living in Ripon around 1950 our milkman had a horse drawn milk float. My mother was always darting out, with the coal shovel, after a delivery, to get the droppings for our garden.
    3 points
  40. I'm 10 years on from my comment in this thread (eek!) and I'm still well happy with S&Ws. I think I began fitting them around 2011, I've now converted a very large proportion of my rolling stock and locos, and have no real grumbles. I use the 3mm version on 4mm stock, and routinely propel trains around 30 inch (and tighter) curves without issue. I put permanent magnets on my running lines as well as sidings, so trains have to be able to run through without anything uncoupling when it isn't wanted. Now and then I do get an issue with a guard's van or similar detaching from the e
    3 points
  41. It is still used in bell founding. I used to have on my desk a plug of it from the casting of our bells; it was, of course, perfectly sterile and odourless.
    3 points
  42. I remember reading a book about market gardeners in Paris in the 19th and 20th centuries. Apparently, after delivering in Central Paris, they would backload horse manure to their gardens in the outskirts. Rather than simply composting the manure, they stacked it in 'hot beds', where the heat from decomposition enable them to get a head-start with the the more cold-sensitive crops. Apparently, this meant they could harvest up to seven times in a normal year. The rotted-down manure would be used to enrich the soil. There was another use for horse manure; as a component of the moulds for cas
    3 points
  43. Hi @Mikkel (and the 202 other followers of this blog post), Sorry for resurrecting what may seem like ancient history, but I was wondering if your process has changed over time? I'm not far off fitting S&W couplings to my stock, such as it is, and was wondering if there were any hints and tips further experience has brought. A little way off scattering horse poo about the layout, but when the time comes it'll be this blog I look to for information: there is nothing that isn't improved by a trip to Farthing Cheers, Schooner
    3 points
  44. Doorways to houses and shops used to have an iron boot scraper by the front door so that you could scrape off whatever you'd trodden in.
    3 points
  45. My grandfather used to horrify us when were young, by collecting sheep droppings in his cloth cap (which had a plastic liner); after he'd transferred them to a hessian sack in the water butt, he'd simply shake his hat 'clean', and put it back on. He used to claim it made his hair grow..
    3 points
  46. Thank you Eric. What a superb scene. Perhaps in principle it would need a bit more dung, but I would hesitate to add more to something so complete. It' easy to go overboard with this stuff, I think. Ah yes, the lime wash. I haven't seen mention of that in connection to stables. On the cleaning of stables, Janet Russell, in "Great Western Horsepower" (p197) writes about GWR Horse Superintendents, who: "...toured their 'territories' regularly checking the condition of the horses, the quality and quantity of the feed, the cleanliness of the harness, stabl
    3 points
  47. Across the sea in Bruges they have a solution to fouled streets.
    3 points
  48. I've just seen the layout's BRM appearance. A very enjoyable read and great photos.
    3 points
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