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Showing content with the highest reputation on 27/09/21 in all areas

  1. Some years ago we were on holiday in the western isles of Scotland and got the ferry to Colonsay where we hired bikes and cycled round the island. I don't know what sort of rubber the brake blocks on my bike were made of but whatever it was it didn't achieve much in the way of retardation and by the time we got back to the port there wasn't much of it left. Now, the road leading to the quayside is on a long and fairly steep hill and the sensible option would have been to get off the bike and walk down so I didn't do that and half way down the speed had reached the stage where heavy braking was necessary. Needless to say, what remained of the sponge rubber blocks made little difference to the rate of descent but luckily I managed to negotiate the bend at the bottom of the hill at some eye watering speed and avoid an early bath without mowing down any of the startled pedestrians. When finally I managed to stop I was somewhat shaken so when we took the bikes back to the hire shop I told the owner what I thought of the brakes on my bike, to which he responded, "Aye, well, if ye will go tearin' around usin' them all the time....." Dave
    6 points
  2. Showing the Feather A Down goods is seen blasting away on the 1 in 200 on a very blustery afternoon, the engine clearly in fine fettle.
    6 points
  3. The 12:30 Elland to Hipperholme service, seen at Brookfoot, on the Calder Vale Mineral & Light Railway, just before the outbreak of the First World War.
    6 points
  4. It's the last train of the day and after bringing up empty slate wagons, unusually there are no loaded to collect. So, it's 'light engine' down the valley although there maybe some empty vans to pick up at Glennock. Driver William 'Bill' Thwaite, has decided to let young fireman Ben Taylforth have the regulator for the return working. With little work for 'RHENEAS' to do on the down gradients, Bill keeps an eye ahead as Ben takes No. 2 carefully over the forestry crossing.
    6 points
  5. Sorry for lack of updates, I'd been distinctly off colour for a most of the summer, so things had slowed to crawl. This culminated last Friday (September 17th), when I was rushed to hospital after suffering a 'Cardiac Event' (heart attack). I'm on the mend, but I'm having to take things easy.
    5 points
  6. I wanted some Private Owners for Farthing, so have built a couple of Powsides kits, i.e. painted and pre-lettered Slaters kits. I went for two Gloucester designs to RCH 1887 specifications, one a 5-plank side-door wagon, the other a 7-plank side- and end-door job. I like the overall appearance, although TBH the small lettering isn’t quite up to current standards. Perhaps I was unlucky, they look fine on the website. The kits have blank interior sides, so the moulding pips were filed away and planking was indicated with a scriber. The instructions recommend joining all sides first, then mounting the floor inside. I struggled a bit with this, the floor wasn’t a perfect fit and the sides were lightly curved. Some dismantling and remedial work ensued, but I got there in the end. I used waisted pin-point bearings from MJT. Split spoke wheels on one wagon, and plain spokes for the other one because I ran out. Did some of these wagons eventually receive plain spoke wheels? Otherwise I’ll swop the erroneous set later. Some of the small lettering was a bit damaged or missing as the kits came. I touched it up as best I could. Some bits I simply painted over. I’d rather have absent lettering than odd lettering. The built-up wagons. Having admired Dave’s lovely builds of the 7mm versions of these kits, I decided to indicate the interior ironwork as he has done. For this I simply used strips of Evergreen (painted darker after this shot). Good interior photos of these wagons are rare, so drawing on discussion by Stephen and other helpful RMwebbers I drew up the above sketch to guide my detailing of the interior. Please note that this is my own rough and ready rendering. There are various unknowns and no one has “signed off” on this sketch. Anyone interested should consult Stephen’s drawing and info here. Interior ironwork in place. The kit does include a hinge for the end door. On some wagon types this was positioned above the top plank, but in this case I fitted it just behind the top plank, based on this discussion. Archer’s rivet transfers at the fixed ends. Stephen pointed out the “big nuts” that appear on the ends of many Gloucester wagons, extending from the diagonal irons inside. Looking at photos they seem to have been present on both 5-, 6- and 7-planks as seen here left to right (obviously only at fixed ends). The nuts don’t feature in the kit, so I added them. On the 7-planker I drilled holes and stuck in bits of brass. This proved tricky as it’s just by the corner joins, so on the 5-planker I Mek-Pak’ed on bits of plastic rod instead, as seen above. As usual: Liquid Gravity and 3mm Sprat & Winkles. I'm always amazed how much difference weight makes to the "feel" of a wagon. The couplings too: Ugly they may be, but they turn it into a working vehicle. Weathering the interior with pigments. The “Sinai Dust” seen here is courtesy of the late Mick Bonwick. Thank you, Mick. The Ayres wagon. Phil Parker uses a fibre glass brush to fade the lettering on printed RTR wagons. But these are transfers, so would tear (I did try). Instead I lightly dry-brushed base colour over the lettering. Helps a bit, but not quite as effective. C&G Ayres still exist as a well-known Reading removal company and former GWR cartage agent. This (very) close crop shows one of their removal containers at Reading ca. 1905. But a search of the British Newspaper Archive showed that C&G Ayres were also at one time coal traders [Source: Reading Mercury Oxford Gazette March 9, 1918]. So I need to decide whether to designate the Ayres wagon for coal or furniture. I wonder if this explains the difference between the red Powsides livery and the green wagon livery that I normally associate the company with. The Weedon wagon. You can just make out the nuts on the ends, but they aren't really noticeable. The effort would arguably have been better spent detailing the brake gear! I had assumed the Weedon Brothers were mainly coal and coke merchants, but again newspapers and directories of the time offered further info. [Source: Kelly's Directory of Berks, Bucks & Oxon, 1911]. It seems that manure was also a key aspect of their business. The company features on the right in this directory clipping - amongst lime burners, loan offices, lunatic asylums and other essentials of progress! Though based at Goring, the Weedon Brothers had stores in a number of places, as illustrated in the above 1889 advert. I’m inclined to designate the wagon for manure rather than coal. I wonder what that would mean for the weathering? Richard's latest book on Wiltshire Private Owners is firmly on my wishlist. Anyway, the wagons are now running at Farthing. Here's No. 1897 knocking them about in the sidings behind the stables. Overall I've enjoyed the build. May have a go at applying my own transfers next time. It's just a couple of plastic wagons of course, but I learnt a lot along the way. That's one of the great things about modelling, every build is an entry point to railway history. Thanks to everyone for the help.
    4 points
  7. I had brake fade on my cycli g tour of the rockies. A 2 mile descent at 1 in 15. I could smell the rubber and stopped twice to let thi gs cool dow, including my heart rate. 2000' of descent though. Jamie
    4 points
  8. With Great Coles Wood Farm in the distance, ex-L&SWR B4 Class No 30096 propels Box Van No 45374.
    4 points
  9. Swooping low over the town, our favourite Squadron Leader fires of the camera for this aerial shot.
    3 points
  10. You need to go to Specsavers, Baz.
    3 points
  11. Huh! I've been trying to get my head around the baseplates used on crossings (frogs) built with flat-bottom rail and Pandrol clips. With bullhead rail there are cast-iron chairs for every crossing angle. The chair's jaws are aligned at the required angle (which means there are a heck of a lot of different castings.) Other than the baseplate at the Vee the baseplates for FB crossings are not angled at all. They are simply spacers that maintain the correct distance between the rails. That makes it much simpler to make 3-D prints of the baseplates. Basically it only needs a single model to produce any of them. If you are still reading this drivel kindly move on to the next post
    3 points
  12. Excellent work Mikkel, the wagons look great and thanks for the link to my 7mm efforts If you want to have a go fading the writing on Slaters wagons with a fibreglass brush, paint the sides with varnish first and allow to dry. The varnish seals the lettering in place, but the fibreglass bristles wear this away very progressively and allow some subtle distressing/fading. Best wishes Dave
    3 points
  13. That just sounds very wrong... Maybe it's just me? I like how "Due to previous problems I no longer ship to the Russian Federation" History has taught the rest of us not to p### off the Russians...
    3 points
  14. I am trying to hold it, but I don’t think I can…. Don’t call him Surely
    3 points
  15. Following the West Riding, here's a going away view.
    3 points
  16. This kit of a Bedford OSBT 5 ton tipper lorry in 1:24 scale ismanufactured by a EMHAR which is a division of Bachman. I was a bit worried when I saw "Made in China" on the box but I thought I would give it a go. Perhaps I have been spoilt by the superb quality of the couple of MiniArt kits I have made recently (made in Ukraine) where the fit of the parts was superb. Every part needed quite a lot of sanding and filing to remove the mould lines but with a bit of work it builds into a really nice model. Stu
    3 points
  17. I put the fibres in a big coffee jar and like you, attacked them with a fork. Stir aggressively, stir often! The next layer will be attached with WWS layering spray. I've had a go and it works well. I will also add bits of scatter for weeds etc. I will probably be chopping up some old artists brushes to make standing weeds ( I get through a lot of them. ) The layering spray was accidental, it came in the unused job lot that included the applicator. I hope that I have begun to achieve the open countryside feeling that Rob @NHY 581 spoke of when I was describing the vision for this layout in the first few pages. I'm having a rest now that stage one is complete. I'm pretty flocked...
    3 points
  18. Hi, Here are some more photos from our running day. It was only the second time in 18 months we have had the pleasure of operating the layout, we very much enjoyed it. Sorry I feeling lazy so please make up your own captions for the photos below. You can post them on this thread, sorry no prizes for the best ones! This is a shot of the Dapol HST-P flashing past the depot! Mark brought this along for a test and running in session. I have to agree with him ,it is a fine looking model. Cheers Duncan
    3 points
  19. Lovely! The variation in the coach roof colours catches the eye, that's something I need to do on Chuffnell R. Along with about a million other things, that is...
    2 points
  20. What for? US railroad practice is essentially to maximise train length and minimise train numbers. UK railway practice focuses on traffic density, running train lengths which haven't really changed since the First World War. There WERE double headed freight workings in the diesel era but they were never common and I can't remember when I last saw one.
    2 points
  21. 2 points
  22. Looking good. Now I have no choice but to retrofit the big nuts on all my Gloucester wagons... I very much doubt any C&G Ayres mineral wagon was used for furniture - they were coal merchants on a large scale, as the size of their fleet indicates. There's a little essay about them by Keith Turton on Warwickshire Railways from which I learned that the green and yellow livery dates from 1910 - which skewered my Hornby upgrades, at least for my c. 1902 purposes - while the red goes back to broad gauge days. I find myself twitching about that Weedon wagon. I wonder if this is one where POWSides have used a Gloucester wagon to stand in for a wagon of some other builder. The layout of the lettering doesn't look quite right - I would expect Wallingford Watlington and Wheatley each to be written on a plank, not over the join of two planks. Unfortunately I don't have Bill Hudson's Vol. 2, which is where the Lightmoor Index tells me a photo is to be found but there is a photo of a coke wagon built by the Birmingham RC&W Co. in the HMRS collection. Anyway, as I know you know, there were plenty of dumb-buffered PO wagons still doing sterling service - there's a rather nice one from Wyken Colliery, on the LNWR Coventry-Nuneaton line, in that famous Vastern Road Yard photo! (Just to the left and down from the C&G Ayers furniture container.) Re. that container - it does look very like the ones that became widespread in the 1930s but c. 1905 there were no conflats - so presumably an ordinary low-sided open would be used. Excuse my insomniacal ramblings.
    2 points
  23. Who knew? I have an 8T cattle wagon by wrenn, I now look at it as my retirement plan!
    2 points
  24. Hell fire! I bought a Hornby Dublo Mica on the 'Bay last week for £5 BIN, £9 with the postage, virtually identical to this one which is 20 times the price. As I replaced the HD chassis the Wrenn's tension locks are not a feature, and the the couplings on the Bachmann chassis I used are better, as are the buffers and wheels. The Baccy chassis is vastly superior in terms of detail than the old HD mazak with no handbrake levers, which is continued on the Wrenn. I'll admit the printing is a little better, but not much; certainly not £94.01 better!
    2 points
  25. Thank you for those William, I had know idea there was a Carette K. Bay. Sts. B. Vauclain Compound outside of continental Europe. (its to the immediate right of the GCR tank in the last photo) Here its prototype, which is really a 4-4-2. The Royal Bavarian State Railway class S 2/5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bavarian_S_2/5_(Vauclain) Douglas
    2 points
  26. Major Update Time: Firstly, the goods platform is now complete (bar weathering) and the areas of flat land in the goods yard have been covered now with a mix of Earth and Burnt Grass Scatter and Ballast (both fine and coarse grades). The Balerno Brake Third is complete bar a couple of final details, no further progress on the regular Third. Trees have been made and added, as have a couple of wild animals. Finally, the coal merchant's hut was repainted to a Satin black and a sign placed onto the front side of the hut. Still need to wire in the third lamp. Next steps will be adding grass to some of the flat areas of goods yard as well as some coal, sacks and scales for the merchant and some weathering of the platforms and buildings. Overall, shaping up very nicely, starting to look like a more full scene now!
    2 points
  27. It has often been said that the camera is the harshest critic. I tend to agree with that so I thought I would post a couple of photos of completed sides to see how they look in the context of the layout before going ahead with the other two. So, here we are. Diagram 96 all third, compartment side. Diagram 94 composite, corridor side. Those look reasonable to me, apart from the dust. Getting there.
    2 points
  28. Heh, well, Compound the triang/Hornby versions have been battered into shape by dedicated modellers over the years. However I see they go on ebay for more than I'm building these for. I thought about it in the past and decided that getting it right from the start was actually the simpler option. Cheers Mikkel. There is a photo in the carriage book that shows them, but it is from an oblique angle and has a bit of reflection on it. So I scanned it in and messed about in Affinity for a while but couldn't get it to look right. So I hit the net, lion rampant with laurel leaves sinister. Oddly the best that came up was actually a crochet pattern. Really. So I threw that into Affinity and messed about. After a lot of changes it ended up as the image you see there, printed out on matte photo paper and stuck behind the glazed window. So if anyone is making some GCS I'd happily send them the print file. all 18.4 MB of it ......
    2 points
  29. Wrong trailer? Should be 4479 shirley...
    2 points
  30. 50-60 years ago my Dad rode a Lake District circuit including Hard Knott and Rynose passes. His bike had new brake blocks with a new material at the beginning of the day; by the time he got home there was almost no material left.
    2 points
  31. Hello Rowsley, what is the type of chimneyin your kit. In my period, many of the old Midland engines sported the lovely Johnson chimney. K’s did a nice one in cast white metal, and many years ago I bought a good stock, which now, sadly, are all gone. There are some very nice cast or turned brass which are advertised as the Johnson type, but they are more like the parallel chimneys of Deeley and Fowler, certainly not got the curves of Johnson’s design. Derek
    2 points
  32. Thanks Dave. Dry-brushed Vallejo "Pale sand" works well for light weathering, I think. That and MIG "Light European Earth" pigment are used for weathering across buildings, ground and stock, in an attempt to bring things together visually.
    2 points
  33. Graffiti is for babies ..................... or for those poor souls who can't find anything constructive to do. like, perhaps, railway modelling
    2 points
  34. So hopping in our TARDIS we go back 3 hours and 7 minutes and a few miles north-west to get to Schonblick where we left it. We then have a leisurely breakfast as we wait for time there to get to 10:09 when the passenger loco heads to the carriage siding. A few minutes later the freight loco starts herding wagons. 10:51 and both the passenger and freight trains are ready to head off to Neustadt. Neustadt needs some more attention now. The trip freight heads out at 10:48 (Neustadt time) and as soon as it arrives back at the temporary loops the wagons are put away and the loco gets its coupling checked - it was a bit low but quickly bent back into alignment. 10:54 and the S-banh arrives at Neustadt. The branch passenger is supposed to be running round its coaches but, slight problem, it isn't actually here. Checking the master schedule revealed that the entry for the passenger train's journey from Schonblick to Neustadt had been omitted from the local timetable sheets. Ooops. Still, being master of this little universe has its advantages and the branch passenger can be hustled over in the blink of an eye. 11:03 Schonblick time and the reight gets underway for its run of about 4 yards to Neustadt. Where it arrives at 11:15 Neustadt time. The timetable claims that the run takes 12 minutes which makes the scehdule look reasonable. If I was using a fast clock the journey would only be timetabled for a couple of minutes.
    2 points
  35. Very elegant, Dave. I'll have to look into that technique, it clearly works very well. Those frosted glass designs are a triumph.
    2 points
  36. I wish you a speedy recovery. Regards
    2 points
  37. Thanks John, I think the interior detailing is worth it for an empty wagon. Sheeting them would be a lot quicker though!
    2 points
  38. Due to unseasonably fine weather today we have cycled the High Peak It was a bit rough out of Cromford, ( ran out of gears) but once at Middleton Top things got a lot easier and the heart rate dropped below 400bpm The 1 in 14 (Hopton?) Was done in three chips without a dismount Our ride was punctuated by a ride on the Steeple Grange Light Railway. A fascinating 330 million year history of limestone with a train ride thrown in. No fares, just donations We turned round at Parsley Hay after a much deserved coffee So here I am saddle sore, but pleased with the 49.125km ( c 30 miles I think) completed and the postponment of the threatened shopping trip to Merry Hill I was a little concerned coming back down the inclines about whether bikes can get brake fade with heating. The back wheel was very warm to the touch and there was a real risk of making an appearance at High Peak Jn like James the red engine Oh, and I found some diesel. Strangely only 50 yds from home Andy
    2 points
  39. Been a fairly productive day today. There's a Grantham running session next weekend, so I've been preparing some locos which have a serious chance of being ready by then. That's K3s in the main. Other than the two already seen in these pages, I acquired this at the start of the month. Nicely built, big Portescap and a Larry Goddard paint job. Bargain. It's turned into a bit of a conundrum, though. 4005 did run with a GS tender in the 1930s, so good for Grantham. However it did not have vac braking for the loco at that time, so the top reservoir on the tender had to go, Larry or no Larry. There's no coal, so the paintwork scar will be covered up by a spill. Then the tender lining was wrong - it had been done as panels, rather than the top and bottom lines continuing round the corners and across the back. Now we're seriously interfering with a Larry paint job, but after a few days contemplating I took the lines off with cellulose thinners and a cocktail stick and made good the gaps. The other problems are the smokebox door rivets, which are wrong for the LNER period. I have drawn the line there as we might get into serious respray territory and they aren't that conspicuous. As well as Larry's signature underneath, it's marked (in his writing) 'Alton Model Centre'. Unfortunately they don't have records so can't tell me who built it. Whoever they were was a very good builder. It has a representation of the conjugated gear and plunger pickups, which I've never been able to make work. I don't think it's ever been used - the wheels were spotless and there were no couplings or any sign of any ever having been fitted. I'm not sure it had ever pulled a train - until today. It hadn't lived entirely in a cabinet, though - there was damage to the front guard irons and vac upstand and a number of paint chips, suggesting a drop or some rough handling. When I tested it on the layout, the sandpipes touched the track and the loco-tender gap was way too tight for 3' curves, suggesting it had not been run to any great extent. I've added worksplates and glazed the spectacles, touched in the chips and bare metal and extended the tender drawbar. It has now done a few laps on Ramsey with the Scotch Goods stock and works as well as it looks. If I can find a crew to fit in the very restricted cab it will get one, but certainly coal, fire irons and a light weathering are in view. Here is is with 17, which also did some more test running today, as a result of which the tender will have some ballast added. 227 is still having final paintwork done on the tender, but it'll have its own gallop round tomorrow. While the Scotch Goods was out, I added this to photograph - Riley now suitably protected for its journey.
    2 points
  40. Today, we fitted the long awaited turntable bridge from Mike Greenwood Models and to be honest what a fiasco this has been, 19 weeks from purchase to delivery and three turntables later..... when the turn around (excuse the pun) time is 2 weeks....Anyway it arrived yesterday and fitted today so here it is fitted at last. The 40 only just fits on it so we might need to put a restriction on some of the loco's that need to stable.
    2 points
  41. Decided to have a ride on the bike today as it was a nice morning and I’m not in work until later on took the bike on the roof rack to do the old leek and manifold railway from Waterhouses to hulme end, just over 8 miles each way on the old trackbed of the 2”6’ narrow gauge line that run up the manifold valley serving farms and small communities, it was built for dairy traffic but also carried passengers, a link to Wikipedia is below to see a bit more about the line https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leek_and_Manifold_Valley_Light_Railway the ride is absolutely brilliant, tarmac all the way, some a bit rough in places but nothing really bad, the ride starts at the old interchange station at Waterhouse’s where the narrow gauge line was alongside the main line you then cross the main road and head off up the valley The trackbed looks like a road but this is for cycles and pedestrians only Lots and lots of bridges crossing over the meandering river, the river however was completely dry today! It then narrowed and the line twisted and curved along the valley bed Lots of Rocky outcrops to be seen en route And then through Swainsley tunnel, after this the trackbed is shared by a road for a short while which looks to have replaced the old road with a weak bridge Into the shaded valley, the trackbed sightly higher than the river on a ledge The platform on the right is the old milk churn loading platform for Ecton creameries which was off to the right behind me And the end of the line at hulme end, the old station building now used as toilets and a small visitor exhibition which has a static 009 model of the station and surrounding area The tea rooms built to look like the old carriage shed that used to stand at that location, inside 2 of the roof joists/legs are the original ones used in the new construction Nice lemon meringue pie too! And heading back the other way to Waterhouses, just after leaving Hulme end before the valley starts to close in An old crossing The tunnel again lots of sweeping curves Thor’s cave above the river And back to Waterhouses, no more pics there though Some fantastic video of the line on YouTube can be seen here i then set off for home but decided to stop at rudyard lake and do a circular ride around there, there is a miniature railway that runs for a short distance alongside the lake along the old trackbed of the line from north rode jn to uttoxeter via leek they had a loco in steam today on the hourly service It’s an impressive set up with the whole station area signalled properly with colour lights etc The line runs unfenced alongside the footpath After that ends it’s cycle/footpath only to the end of the lake I then went back up the other side of the lake Past the abandoned cliffe park hall, apparently it used to be a youth hostel that has now been left derelict for whatever reason Then it was back down the hill to the dam end of the lake which was very low on water The train was making its way back as I came back along the old trackbed And back at the station by that time the steam loco had come off and a diesel had taken over for the last train of the day The line even has automatic 1/2 barriers! And that was that for the day, in later tonight Sudbury to Hinksey possession train
    2 points
  42. Just a couple of pics of 56090 at home on the layout with the Prestwick tanks. Looks fab and glad I did myself a new Colas 56 as the old ones didn’t quite hit the spot. Going to do a partner for it at some point. Next update will be along soon.
    2 points
  43. Here's another step by step story-board, of how I made a simple building, that I produced for another platform that I though might be of interest here:
    2 points
  44. Probably not. If that thing sells for £250, I will be borrowing my mate's Wadkin lathe and making half a dozen!
    2 points
  45. Work is progressing on various Titfield bits and pieces. Today we shared the latest CAD work for the Bedford OB on social media so I thought I would drop it here too. Enjoy!
    2 points
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