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Showing content with the highest reputation since 24/07/21 in Blog Comments

  1. I will give this my full attention when I have a bottle of lavender water nearby...
    4 points
  2. I should perhaps stress that the style of dress shown in the photo above would not be worn on the platform of a Welsh country station in 1908, let alone 1895. The intention was to illustrate Edwardian jadies! For full details, see here.
    4 points
  3. Ah, Paris! Chris has had a go with string here: https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/82047-traeth-mawr-building-coaches-mostly/&do=findComment&comment=4434807 Incidentally I've noticed a new range of Edwardian figures from Arch Laser here: https://www.osbornsmodels.com/arch-laser-osbf0020-oo-gauge-edwardian-passengers-oo--176-scale--unpainted-set-of-six-51528-p.asp
    3 points
  4. I dare say that some of the tree modelling techniques so ably demonstrated on RMWeb could be adapted to make a respectable model of those hats.... Kit PW
    3 points
  5. `Tis 1930 and the first passenger train has arrived...... hooray something to play with at last.
    3 points
  6. That's no thing to say about respectable young women, though from what one reads there was certainly at least the usual proportion of jades and jezebels:
    3 points
  7. For those who like a good bit of scandal, here's the original version of Abraham Solomon's First Class, as mentioned by @5&9Models back in March: Notice that in this version the young man is a Sporting Gentleman; in the revised version he has become a Naval Officer and therefore of unimpeachable good character.
    3 points
  8. Thanks! Those who are responsible can take the credit. The canopy shot is aided by the fact that track height is 1300mm above the floor. It's great seeing it all come together, and one of the best ways to appreciate it is to drive a train service through it... several scale kilometers of travel.
    2 points
  9. I'm still being patient for eight plates that I ordered on 31 December, 2020. I thought they would show when Jim announced on 3 June, via his website, that he had received a massive order of plates, and only had a hundred orders to go. Only July 6th, I sent him a letter, in 18 point font so it would be easy to read, asking if my order has been misplaced. The letter included a copy of our email exchange, where Jim acknowledged receipt of nearly 50 pounds, via paypal friends and family. I still have not had a reply. I am in the US, so mail takes a bit longer to go back and forth than in the UK, but not much. The other UK small suppliers I order from have been posting to me inside of two weeks.
    2 points
  10. Neil, I use acrylic primers if I am brushing and try and brush off any excess. I try to spray though, if I can, using Halfords finest. If you look back in Mikkel's blog, and look forward you will see quite a lot about figures and painting. There is some info about figures on my Traeth Mawr thread, just go page by page until you see a picture.
    2 points
  11. An art historian would probably tell us that, yes, the young man is a Sporting Gent but the fishing rod also refers to the compliments for which the young lady is angling (rather successfully by the looks of it: if the newspaper tells us anything, it didn't take long either). Kit PW
    2 points
  12. Hi Mikkel, Bill (Longchap) just directed me to this work of yours. I'm interested in Weston-super-Mare as it's my hometown I was delighted to learn about the former Stables and a quick search of Britain by Air turned up a great photo from 1920s showing the stables face on at the back of the Goods Precinct bordering onto Locking Rd. An archive link confirmed this was it's location. Here: https://www.britainfromabove.org.uk/en/image/EPW001031 It sits directly opposite the end of George street running back from the Yards with label LB above it. 'Reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland' https://maps.nls.uk/index.html
    2 points
  13. Dear Chris, Thank you for your kind words and much-appreciated advice. Figure-painting is something I have put off, but these were just too good to resist. I assumed one did the 'big colours' first, and finished with the detail (the smaller the area the less likely one was to slip). I have noticed both how my eye-sight would benefit from an illuminated magnifier and my hands from being steadier now I am past the half-century. Another concern is trying to keep the layer of paint thin enough to maintain the exquisite detail. I was sorry to see the primer 'reduced' some facial expressions. Do people prefer slightly thinned enamels rather than acrylics? Another aspect to explore... Many thanks again. Neil.
    2 points
  14. I hesitate to comment on Mikkel's thread about people, but I will. They do kook good, A word of advice, it is better to start with the faces and then work outwards as it is easier not to get paint on where you do not want it. I am not sure the figures at the back are more Edwardian, they just do not have such a big crinoline. I saw aphotograph recently of a lady, a titled lady, from the 1860s who had a very long dress that obviously was made to go over a crinoline, but she was not wearing it. What is surprising is that she had her photograph taken like that. I like it that you have a figure of yourself. I have a couple, and of my wife, but neither look like me. Mikkel has written in this blog an in his thread on how he paints his superb figures. My technique is to use a large magnifying glass with built in lamp, then putting both elbows on the table I hold the figure in one hand, the brush in the other and I touch at least my little fingers together. This way if I shake, both hands shake together. Keep up the good work. You will just have to make a diorama, or have them in a corner looking lost.
    2 points
  15. Unable to resist the allure of a well-dressed lady, I splashed out on Andrew Stadden's figures - who needs boring brick-work to finish a layout when you can feast your eyes on a crinoline or silk topper? - and they are stunning. These are my favourites at the moment, with the fullest skirts. The above is the full set, sorted by skirt size, three at the back being more of an Edwardian outline. And here come the gentlemen, sorted into coat style (frock coat single-breasted, double-breasted, tail-coat, 'sack coat')... I am the figure top row, 2d from right, to have a cane added. My photography is hopeless, and adding a coat of primer does not enhance the detail, but as you can see I have started playing around with sample 'slabs' of colour, an acrylic set picked up during the virus confinement at Wilko's. How you gents can get such precise detail on your figures I know not, but I hope with practice I can get some sort of decent finish. My partner bought me this for my birthday: ... which goes into even more detail than the 'joint volume' I cited earlier. If anyone has any queries they think might be answered by this book, please do not hesitate to ask me to check. Quite where I am to put these figures when finished, on a 1970's B.R. (S.R.) Goods Yard, I have no idea. But they were too good to resist when I had a few quid in my pocket. Hope this is of interest. Best wishes to you all.
    2 points
  16. Interesting topic and that kit appeals to me. I think Knightwing do (or did) some general purpose pipework and security fencing mouldings at a low cost for projects like this. Unfortunately I'm no chemist, so I wouldn't know what should go where. I don't think these factories exist as generic breweries for every chemical known to man though, but are specifically designed to produce particular products which are needed on an industrial scale. So to build something plausible, I suppose I'd have to nominate some specific chemical, and then I'd need an expert to explain its production equivalent of the knee-bone-is-connected -to-the-hip-bone. And I'd want to know how raw materials arrive and how the finished goods leave, preferably both by rail of course. Whilst that does look to me as a layman like a chemical plant and I like the illumination you've fitted, I suspect a chemical engineer would want all sorts of things changed. For example if a chemical is dangerous if it escapes, they tend to put a bund round the tank to catch any leakage. It bears a passing resemblance to the Gas terminal at Bacton in Norfolk, though that is rather flatter and seems to have a lot more pipes. https://www.shell.co.uk/about-us/what-we-do/bacton-gas-plant/about-bacton-gas-plant.html That would make an interesting model but it seems to have a (justifiable) 24-hour police presence, and I think you would be arrested on suspicion of terrorism if you so much as stopped and pulled out a camera. Looks like a cushy but very boring job for the rozzers.
    1 point
  17. It was held in a school hall in Sussex. The majority of the UK FREMO group are local, for historical reasons. I brought my stuff from London, and that's the way these meetings are normally done. In normal times it's common for people to cross borders to attend a meeting -- it's a social event as well, and a chance to swap knowledge and techniques. As with a joint layout project, by coming along individuals get inspiration and encouragement for their modelling. I did much more to my modules and stock in the week leading up to the meeting than I thought possible, for example ;-)
    1 point
  18. The brass gears would date the loco to 70's or very early 80's.
    1 point
  19. Thank you BW. It's a shame that it is so blurred, but we must be thankful for any record of it. And these ghostly images of buildings speaking to us from the past can be quite fascinating. You will probably know that there is a drawing for this in "Great Western Horse Power" by J. Russel (p 199). One of the larger single-storey examples on the system, with 2 x 10 stalls + an annex with a "Loose Box", a provender store and a harness room. I also happen to be interested in the Cattle Market shown in your map, as I am thinking of featuring such a facility on my next layout. It will depend a bit on whether I can accommodate public access to it within the design. Your map illustrates how it could be done, thanks!
    1 point
  20. Watlington has a topic here too: https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/150557-watlington-in-british-outline-h0-scale/ John has emigrated, I'm not sure whether he was able to take the layout with him.
    1 point
  21. I have found a few additional items to make an update to this list worthwhile. The most useful new resource is probably Lincoln Locos, who seem to be able to produce first-class 1:87 prints of their designs upon request. Also, Gaugemaster are now selling some plastic kits of 1:87 buildings under their own brand.
    1 point
  22. Mikkel, I think if you look at the films of the day the ladies carried on as much as they do now. They wore these dresses continually so were used to them. In 'Grandfather's London', photos from 1875, there is a picture of a lady carrying her child. Reason for Edit: jadies to ladies
    1 point
  23. Just seen this. Good to see some more of Andrew's period figures! C126, you could do a diorama for them, e.g. a family gathering around their means of transport, or similar. I'm doing a street scene at the moment and was wondering if I should include a couple of Andrew's ladies promenading. Although on reflection I don't know how much of a walk even the more liberal Edwardian dresses allowed for?! I think I prefer Solomon's second attempt. Although less daring at first sight, the colours and the looks are really much more, well, sexy.
    1 point
  24. Likewise sorry to hear your story, but, flip the situation on it's head, try get back into modelling, doesn't matter if it's only in a small way, and use it it as an escape/release from the real world issues, it worked for me, albeit in slightly different circumstances. Keep us informed, there's plenty of support hereabouts. Mike.
    1 point
  25. Thanks Martin and Porcy, I thought the Bachmann injectors looked a bit shrivelled. I have some Comet lost wax castings that I was saving for my Model Loco kit, but maybe I should just use them on 92061 rather than hoarding them :-). The plastic pipework is very fragile, and I have already broken part of it so it probably makes sense to replace evrything -- at least if I replace it with wire it will be round ... I hadn't realised Lanarkshire models did a slightly better air pump, so very grateful for the heads-up -- I might pick up a pair at Scalefour North on Saturday. Richard --
    1 point
  26. Hi Richard, Pete will confirm, but I'm sure that Alan Gibson does wheelsets on axles to fit Bachmann frames (metric rather than Imperial) - no need to drill out but too late now. There are some faults with the Bachmann that I think need attention, not all on every version. All 9Fs had exhaust stem injectors, despite what some books say. When the locos were scrapped, the first items removed were brass fittings and the largest of these was the exhaust steam injector. It was a very large and complicated device originally installed to enable economical use of steam and coal on long sustained runs. Where Bachmann seem to have gone wrong is to measure up a preserved loco and none of these that came from a scrapyard have exhaust injectors. They would be extremely expensive to have made and would be of no use on locos running on preserved railways at low speeds and over short distances. So two live steam injectors were fitted and Bachmann seem to have assumed that this was the norm. There are two preserved locos that didn't survive via a scrap yard, 92220 Evening Star in the National Collection and 92203 which David Shepherd bought direct fro BR. Both of these have exhaust steam injectors with their large diameter copper pipe bringing the exhaust steam to the injector. I've been on 92214 when it was at the NYMR and whilst it doesn't have an exhaust injector, the water valve handle for the live steam injector that replaced it is of the type used on the exhaust injector. Another mistake. The loco I purchased recently, 92113, has, on the RHS of the firebox a fine model of a carriage heating steam valve. None of the class were so fitted in BR days, not even Evening Star. Again it looks as though Bachmann have faithfully copied a preserved loco which has had one of these valves fitted for obvious reasons. The third thing to watch out for and it is trivial and would have been fitted to 9Fs running on the Western region, is the ATC equipment in the cab adjacent to the drivers seat. All other regions either had nothing or late on, AWS much less obtrusive. Oh, and the Dave Alexander Westinghouse pumps are a shade oversize. Not very noticeable on the 9F but very difficult to accommodate on a Tyne Dock O1. The Lanarkshire Models air pumps are better. Martin.
    1 point
  27. Other cars that could be added to the list are: Austin 1100 - short run model by Artapo Austin Healey 3000 - Wiking (detailing kit by Automobilia) Austin Mini Countryman and Van (including Police version) - Brekina Austin Mini Mayfair - Herpa Austin Healey Mk1 "Frogeye" - Saller Modelle (expensive short run model) Ford Anglia - kit by V&V available from http://www.mfredrichmodelle.de Ford Capri Mk1 V6/1300GT - Wiking Ford Capri III - Herpa Ford Capri RS2600 - Herpa Ford Cortina Mk1 - kit by V&V available from http://www.mfredrichmodelle.de Ford Escort Mk1 (2 and 4 door versions) - Wiking Ford Galaxy - Herpa and Wiking Ford Granada - Herpa and Wiking Ford Sierra - Wiking Jaguar E Type - Wiking (Transkit detailing kit is available from Automobilia) Jaguar MkII - Wiking (Transkit detailing kit available from Automobilia) Jaguar Sport Cabriolet - Wiking Jaguar XJ6 - Brekina MGA Roadster - Wiking (Automobilia Transkit detailing kit is available) MGB - AWM Morris Mini Minor - Wiking Morris Minor - Brekina Triumph TR4 - Wiking (Automobilia Transkit available)
    1 point
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