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Showing content with the highest reputation since 16/01/21 in Blog Comments

  1. When painting my Edwardian period figures (Andrew Stadden), I initially prime them white, then use enamels to paint them. I always mix up colours (never using anything straight from the tin), and mix up 3 shades of the same colour, a base colour, one a little darker (by adding slightly more of the darkest colour used in the mix) for the shadows, and one a little lighter (by adding a touch of white) for the highlights. I tend to apply paint where it is needed with a very fine brush in the shadows rather than an all over wash, and dry brush the highlights. A few photos o
    8 points
  2. Thank you Mikkel. I use Slaters Plastikard sheets. They’re fine but you can’t mix bonds as the courses are slightly out which is really irritating. The other trick is on corners; score a groove in the back and bend the sheet round so you use it like a wrapper. That way your courses stay in line and you don’t get that giveaway joint all the way down the corner edge. I only discovered this half way through my project so some of the earlier buildings don’t have it and it shows. The best disguise for this is to pick out some of the corner bricks in a slightly darker shade,
    5 points
  3. Just completed the SE Finecast kit of the long wheelbase 517. I hope you find the pictures of interest.
    5 points
  4. A detail crop from a photo of Lambourn station in 1898. This was before the GWR take-over. At this point the LVR's wagons were LVR owned second-hand GWR GER and Metropolitan stock. Four sheeted hay/fodder wagons, though I can't make out what it says on them. Perhaps destined for the GWR provender store at Didcot, as per the discussion above. The GWR sheet used on the heavily loaded cart is a bit puzzling, as I doubt the GWR would have a cart here at this time. But what the GWR don't know doesn't hurt them, I suppose
    5 points
  5. Hi Ian, good to hear from you and thanks for your comments. My ‘ballast’ if you can call it that, is Sandtex ‘Old Stone’ masonry paint decanted into a smaller tin (golden syrup) and several spoons of sharp sand (children’s playpit) thrown in and mixed well. Then it’s brushed in, left to dry and then a second coat applied to fill in the gaps and holes that only become apparent when the first layer dries. Wipe it away from rail tops and sides or live to regret it! A general thinned wash of mixed Burnt Sienna and Black acrylic dulls everything down and once all is completely dry, a dry brush of t
    4 points
  6. Thanks Eric. Yes, I was thinking ‘scratch n sniff’.
    4 points
  7. Pat Garland pic half way down https://www.lambournvalleyrailway.info/newbury.html with a Dean Goods on what is described as a pickup goods, but actually a hay train, in early BR days. The wagons could be en route for Didcot. (In which case, presumably marshalled into a DN&S goods at Newbury goods yard, but that it a lot of flaffing around shunting.) Can't help thinking though that Lambourn to Didcot would probably have been a lot quicker by horse and cart. The economics of hay transportation must have been very iffy.
    4 points
  8. I thought normal GW practice was that it was all down to the frames, if it has the original frames then it is still the same engine, everything else was interchangeable.
    4 points
  9. Any colour you like, so long as it's brown.
    4 points
  10. The cobbles look very realistic. Worth the time spent.
    3 points
  11. Brilliant! Will the tannery come with its unique fragrance? Best wishes Eric
    3 points
  12. Could part of the problem be that at some time between the 1920s and 1960s the way monochrome film recorded red and blue changed? It seems the programme can identify blue in Victorian photos: It's definitely NOT a tool for historical research into colours. But thanks for pointing it out anyway; it is a great displacement activity!
    3 points
  13. I agree, Mikkel. I don't think 'rail blue' fans would be impressed by the following 'restoration', although the software does seem to know something about yellow ends: (This photo originally appeared in Stoker's blog 'Rosevear') I regard this as strictly a 'fun' program that can create some charming 'olde worlde' scenes: Mike
    3 points
  14. I think this problem affects all aspects of modelling that with which we are not familiar, certainly industrial subjects. We model what we see, or what we think we see, or even what we would like to think we can see, often with only a basic understanding of what 'it' is nevermind how it works or even why it's there. The example given of signals plonked in random positions is a good one, it winds me up too but I'm an ex-signalman. But the station car park on the same layout will be fine because everyone knows how car parks work even if they don't drive. Collieries, dis
    3 points
  15. Surely Mikkel the old broom handle was never discarded but used for something else! And so it continues - In these days of austerity/lockdown/80% salary furlough, I have become even more mean than usual and have looked to reusing things that I once discarded but never actually got rid of. OK I'm a hoarder. So this Wills Metro kit may have a London Road Models gearbox which I abandoned some time ago in favour of High Level boxes. I've so many of the LRM versions, I thought I'd put them to use. This Frankenstein's monster will also have the bunker from an M&L 633 kit that I decided lon
    3 points
  16. I suspect it's very like the old hand-tinted postcards, especially in accuracy of colour!
    3 points
  17. Possibly right. I might be mistaking the front lamp for the bufferbeam. Eitherway, I'm not changing it now. No 453 at Craven Arms circa 1910:
    3 points
  18. I agree about crossing a Rubicon when you paint ModelU figures. I wouldn’t use anything else now. I’ve even had a go at sculpting my own figures in 4mm and my layout has a few of those. They’re ok if they have their back to you! Personally I prefer enamels for painting anything and that includes figures. I stir the paint very well, wipe the stirrer onto a palette and then have a black, white and dark brown handy for mixing lighter and darker shades. A very pale dry brush is helpful afterwards to highlight the fantastic detail these figures have. I certainly agree about avoidin
    3 points
  19. Have you seen some of the characters in the Pre-grouping docks thread? They look very well nourished, in fact I think they "ate all the pies" and some more! Shades of Mr Bumble from Dickens. Simon
    2 points
  20. Thanks Mikkel and it’s true about motivation. The stock box just holds the bits while I’m working, the numbers relate to the order they entered the system, I keep a matrix so I know which wagon has which type of chassis and wheels etc, eg #13 has no chassis yet as it’s due to have a more complex brake arrangement one, and I haven’t started it yet. The box also has a bigger compartment at the end to hold odds and ends, as yet unallocated parts. This is part of the enjoyment of building for me somehow.
    2 points
  21. That really is top class modelmaking. The thing that stands out for me is the subtle variations in shade of the brickwork. Most modellers ( including myself ) tend to make colours too dense, but that is just about perfect.
    2 points
  22. Impressive. Full of atmosphere, even without scratch'n'sniff!
    2 points
  23. More concerned that adding a passenger rated horse box to a service passenger train leads to it being called “mixed”. Although the headlamp code would remain the same, this isn’t a “mixed” train.
    2 points
  24. Oh, well spotted - thanks Miss P. If anyone were to model that, people would roll their eyes! Apart from the fire hazard, I wonder again how it stays on board. Still, remembering hay loads from my childhood, once it was all tangled up I suppose it did have a certain mass and weight. Or perhaps no one cared about the hay and it was all an elaborate money laundering scheme.
    2 points
  25. A closer look at a better version of the photo doesn't reveal anything about the lettering on the wagons, I'm afraid. I have now found a para which I initially missed in The Lambourn Branch where the authors briefly speculate that non-LVR wagons - especially GWR - were used for in-and outgoing traffic that went beyond Newbury, as transshipment at Newbury would have been too troublesome. This suggests to me that LVR wagons did not travel outside the line. Edited to clarify
    2 points
  26. Second-hand, as the website says. Very second-hand, judging by the photo of the Met C&W Co. ones (4th photo down) - though they do appear to be all of the same type so they may have been sold off from Met's hire fleet rather than simply being old wagons for which the company was acting as broker. This photo (9th photo down) gives the best view of the ex-GER wagons, two of them, from which it's clear they are this antique type, dating back to the 1860s in design, if not necessarily construction. Plus of course there's the inevitable Midland wagon - not a D299 but a 3-plank dropside, D305, o
    2 points
  27. Nice to see the old Finecast Metro again. Or the box at least! This adds a whole new dimension to the philosophical discussion of the fisherman's knife/old broom: If you replace all the parts and then use the replaced parts to make a second identical object, then which is which and what is still the same? I need to lie down
    2 points
  28. Kevin Robertson (who else) and Roger Simmonds can help us here, with the following quote in their superb The Lambourn Branch (Wild Swan 1984 p. 108, not to be confused with later publications by Robertson on the same branch): "Being in a prime agricultural area, a considerable amount of general farm produce was also sent from the station, hay and straw accounting for a large proportion of this. Some was destined for the GWR's own provender store at Didcot, although most went for sale at market. There was also some inward traffic of this nature, some of the local trainers purchasing
    2 points
  29. I like the Dawlish scene, more the beach details than the train. A 2 wheeled pram is something I must make. I wish I could afford as many cigars as IKB. Seems like fun software, I'll have a go .
    2 points
  30. Is this a Local shop for Local people....
    2 points
  31. Yep I'm intending to use permanently fixed rakes of wagons, on my N layout with maybe just the last wagon or two able to be picked off at a wayside station. I'm still looking for a good 2mm coupler , I prefer Dingham in 4mm but they don't make them for N..
    1 point
  32. Thanks Chris, I will have a go with Slaters for my next project. I have been using the Finecast English bond sheets as they have a slightly worn/old world look in close-up, but I have recently had problems with getting the mortar neat, and recent experiments suggests it's down to the groves in the Finecast sheets.
    1 point
  33. Yes: https://maps.nls.uk/view/104196163.
    1 point
  34. Brilliantly excellent ...
    1 point
  35. Thanks Dave. I find it makes a huge difference taking the photos outside. Artificial light, even ‘natural daylight’ LED lighting tends to make the colours too intense. A little tweak when editing the photo can help too.
    1 point
  36. I think the signal man will report train parted... No guards van.. Come to that no instanter or vacuum brake hoses either, as they are XPress rated. Good modelling, what couplers are you intending to use?
    1 point
  37. A tour de force! Dave has already mentioned the colours, which are exactly the shades I associate with Victorian times (or maybe your modelling has brainwashed me ). The textures are excellent too, I think, just look at those setts. PS: Chris, can I ask what brick sheets you are using?
    1 point
  38. Thank you. Very kind of you. Terry
    1 point
  39. Yes, the loco also worked the DN&SR line. The Lambourn bay at Newbury provided much inspiration for the bay at Farthing, including the trackplan, the platform arrangement, the clerestory "strengthener", the horse traffic and the 850. But heavily re-interpreted!
    1 point
  40. Lovely work. The climbing rose is particularly convincing, I think. I am reminded of this photo of Lustleigh, which I keep returning to: http://www.lustleigh-society.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/station-flowers.jpg
    1 point
  41. There is not much more wagonry, and most of the photos of LVR days are also on the LVR website. As the GWR took over fairly early in the line's history, it does tend to dominate. It is an excellent line history though. Lots of bucolic 850s and panniers on short auto- and goods trains (post 1920s bias). That and Robertson's work on the DN&SR are among the best line histories I know. He did a follow-up book called The Lambourn Branch revisited. This is more of a miscellany of his findings since the original publication. It has certain issues with the printing, though
    1 point
  42. You see to have persuaded it to produce some more intense colours than I have managed so far. As you say, it's a pleasant displacement activity
    1 point
  43. I think either would be a decent machine and be a good first printer. I don't have experience of the Ender 3 v2 but have been happy with my Ender 5. I like how I have been able to make modifications to it to add automatic bed leveling with a BLtouch probe and change out the cooling fans to something a little quieter (not that the original were too bad). The amount of support and information online is excellent, folks like kersey fabrications and teaching tech on Youtube are particularly good. Have fun David
    1 point
  44. Continuing to drift gently off-topic, I note that the Wikipedia article on the LVR, evidently quoting the Wild Swan monograph, states that the carriages were purchased from the Lincoln Wagon & Engine Company, though further down the were bought from Brown, Marshall & Co. I believe that the Lincoln Co. was primarily a rolling stock finance and leasing firm (vide Turton's Fifteenth) so what I think may be going on here is that the Lincoln Co. were acting as broker for Col. Archer Houblon; this suggests to me that the Lincoln Co. also procured the wagons for him - or at least the six ex-
    1 point
  45. One thing to ask is whether they are coming in or going out? Lambourn is a small place, but with a heavy concentration of racing stables, which would need plenty of hay.
    1 point
  46. I've tried a lot of the Wills sheets and all the ones I've bought in the last 10 years or so have been of the more workable plastic.
    1 point
  47. Hi Dave Many thanks - look forward to catching up again. The lever frame is made from the DCC Concepts levers which are quite nice to use, if not 100% reliable.
    1 point
  48. Think it will be heading towards 15A land when the lurgy goes away...
    1 point
  49. More similar postings please. This has been great to see from start to finish. Thanks.
    1 point
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