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wombatofludham

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  • Location
    Fairbourne, Gwynedd, Cymru
  • Interests
    LNWR, LMS, West Coast AC Electrics, Midland Red, Crosville and Walsall/WMPTE buses, Classic British Airliners, VW and SAAB cars, The Eurovision Song Contest. Yes, really.

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  1. Crossed wires - Dragon never owned a Viscount, they did eventually acquire Herons and a Viking, but they never got to Broom Hall. Their scheduled service to Liverpool and Manchester out of the airfield at Pwllheli which ran for a few years, was operated by Dragon Rapides or smaller Auster/Miles light aircraft when loads were light, and they also extended their Renfrew to Liverpool service down to Pwllheli on Fridays and Saturdays, again using the DH89. Their licence for the Manchester and Liverpool service out of Pwllheli did authorise the use of a Twin Pioneer in the future, which they never
  2. Going off topic, I was amazed recently to find that during the 1950s there were regular flights from Glasgow to a field near to Butlitz Pwllheli by a Vickers Viking. The field offered "pleasure flights" over Snowdonia in a based Dragon Rapide, but the idea of flying on holiday to Pwllheli seems another world entirely to modern eyes.
  3. I know, I just wanted a UK style blue glass beacon, soon sorted with a touch of paint.
  4. I discovered these via Tatbay and bought one. The Mk2 Transit chassis were still being purchased by some ambulance services long after production ceased using up stockpiled and dealer stock, I've seen one C prefix example that was one of the last delivered to Cleveland. I purchased one of the Honkers Fire Service models which had clear beacons and Chinese script but they were soon changed courtesy of Posca paint pens. Like you say a cracking model and a gap in the Oxford range which goes straight from the 1960s-early 70s Bedford Lomas to the modern day Paramedic Sprinters, perhaps Oxfor
  5. The sun does shine here from time to time. The Fairbourne railway began as a horse drawn tramway built by McDougal's (of self raising flour fame) Property company, to haul bricks from a brickworks alongside the Cambrian railway to build housing for his planned upmarket seaside resort. His plans, which would have included a promenade and pier, plus much more villa housing on a grid street pattern, never came to fruition, but for a while, after the building works stopped, the line was operated as a horse drawn tramway to the ferry across to Barmouth, which had run since mediaeval times, or
  6. Correct, but with modern moulding techniques, using slides, it should be less of a problem for what would be a reasonable money spinner given anything red and blue goes off the shelves like the proverbial sun dried organic waste off a manual handling implement. Surprisingly for a class of loco that spend most of their lives, like Lady Chatterley, being messed around with by blokes in sheds, they carried an interesting range of liveries, early blue, early blue with yellow bib, rail blue with E numbers (not many, but some did, including one which retained a white roof) and refurbished rail
  7. Disappointed still no LMS standard crimson Compound, but very happy with the Portholes even at the RRP (which a certain box shifter is discounting already) and I'll happily add a BSK and SK to the existing rake of ex LMS P3 and Porthole CK in maroon for Wednesford's passengers to be bounced around in to Stoke and Manchester behind an 81, 85 or 86 in 1967. Otherwise a rather quiet announcement, probably no surprise given world events, plus isn't it Chinese New Year soon? Perhaps they are holding back to see how many staff return after the holiday.
  8. An 84 would offer them the chance of a tie in with the NRM as one is in the National Collection, probably as an example of how not to build an electric. Might help with the cost of production. There's also the Mobile Load bank version which was used by the research department in their always popular red and blue livery, and red and blue research stuff always flies off the shelf.
  9. Well Bachmann seem to think so, they continue to churn out 4 car stabiliser rail units and three car DMUs at prices we regularly see people questioning if they will sell. They must be happy their marketing people manage to shift them otherwise they'd be making something else a lot cheaper. They clearly sold enough first run Blue Pullmans to make a second run worthwhile despite pricing some said would make them shelf queens, and even the Grey Pullman train set which very nearly breached £1k appears to have sold, although they are still available. It will all come down to manufacturer
  10. In 45 years of on-off railway modelling, I can honestly say I have never bought a model off the back of a review, I've read them, but I make up my own mind on stuff, after all a review is still one person's opinion. And like backsides, we all have them, and sometimes they blow out unpleasant gas. Ultimately though, what anyone else thinks should be irrelevant. Piling in on magazine reviewers is utterly pointless unless you are someone who, like some of today's social media generation, can't exist unless some influencer has said it's cool.
  11. The S4C programme dates from 1998 and was shown again last night on S4C. It didn't really go into a lot of detail (although the revelation that the death of Lord Vane-Tempest who was a director of the Cambrian Railways, probably saved his cousin Winston Churchill from bankruptcy after he inherited a sizeable sum of money from Vane-Tempest, who was single when he died, was interesting). I can however recommend the book "Deadly Tablet" by David Burkhill-Thomas, which I found a particularly engrossing look at the crash.
  12. Bit of an update on Pendeford Yard. The videos have been "off air" for a while as Simon is rebuilding the layout. The upper level has now gone (it had become increasingly unreliable due to point motor problems and the difficulty of gaining access to the track) and in it's place a new set of exchange sidings has been laid, which will feed into a new steel works, allowing industrial locos and steel traffic to feature. About 50% of the layout is being reworked which is taking some time. However, we have been keeping people updated with a series of update videos which are on the YouTube channe
  13. Speak for yourself. I often find the second and third runs of toolings much more to my taste. Put it this way, I have a celebratory clean, pressed and ready to wear pair of boxers stored ready for when Bachmann announce their second run of the LMS Standard Compound in red, as I will no doubt become incontinent with joy and excitement
  14. Vivian Ellis, who wrote the music "Coronation Scot" apparently never travelled on the train, he was on the "Cheltenham Flyer" when the melody came into his head. At least he gave the music the name of a superior train. Much as I like "Corrie Scot" it is a bit of an overworked cliche whenever a piece of music is needed to go with film of something steamy. There are a number of other Light Music composers who have done music with a railway theme but most British light music for me captures the false nostalgia a lot of people have for the 1930s and 1950s steam railway (I say false nostalgi
  15. Might not be a bad idea. My first trip on a 156 from BHM to Norwich when new had me sat opposite the new "Tardis" lavatory which was confusing people with the array of buttons you had to press - one to go in, one to close, but crucially, one to lock. One, slightly inebriated gentleman just about managed to get the door open and shut, but crucially forgot to lock. Cue woman and child desperate for the loo - and before I could say "there's someone in there" said child pressed the button, to allow a full view of gentleman, "nicyrs i llawr", sat on the pan. Some form of DCC control of the
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