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dibber25

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dibber25 last won the day on October 12 2013

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  1. I produced etched brass models of those glazed gable ends and the window frames in 4mm:1ft scale for a Model Rail magazine project about 15 years ago - I still have a few of the etchings somewhere. The model was effectively a 'OO' version of the well-known 'O' gauge model - we even fiddled around photographing it with mirrors like the 'O' version. From memory, it had part of the traverser and one or two bays of A Shop itself. It was displayed at one of the model events at STEAM and I think it was eventually sold, so it may still exist. A Shop, when built, was the largest industrial building under one roof, in Europe, and its total area was 11acres. My friend Keith Willows worked in construction and knew the guys who demolished A Shop. I have one of the GWR Storm Water manhole covers which Keith had converted into a (very heavy!) patio table. (CJL)
  2. I haven't checked, but I think D601 was the one number which is available in green with either the original (horizontal) or the later (vertical) grilles. (CJL)
  3. As far as I'm concerned if the subject is important to me I want all the books on that particular subject and I'm not worried about who the publisher is. I'm currently 'into' the Wisbech & Upwell Tramway. I have five books - Wild Swan, Middleton, Oakwood, Becknell and Town & Country. The Oakwood book is the most thorough in terms of text - the Wild Swan is the largest format for photos. (CJL)
  4. The steps are part of the chassis casting. The side skirt is a flat plastic moulding with some locating tabs along the top. The spark arrestor is factory-fitted and consists of an etched 'mesh' top and sides - the holes are tiny but in certain circumstances you can probably see through them. (CJL)
  5. "Can only be put down to paint finish." Not necessarily - costs of repair, refurbishment or replacement of damaged/worn out tools, adaptation of tools to fit different equipment, cost of recovering tools from one factory to another, increased cost of bought-in parts such as motors etc, or maybe just the need to make a better margin than in the past. (CJL)
  6. In a Christmas spoof article in Model Railway Constructor, Alan Williams once suggested a 'Cottage' class of Pannier tanks. Had it happened, I guess the 16xx that went to the Dornoch branch could have been named 'Dunroamin' on its return. Maybe the one that worked the vinegar branch in Worcester should have been Outhouse. (CJL)
  7. Towards the end of their time on the Wisbech & Upwell, D2201/2 received the later BR crest and wasp stripes, presumably on BR green livery. However, were the side skirts green or black? I'm thinking they were green but, being below running plate level, they might/should have been black? (CJL)
  8. I will check when I'm next in the office (I'm currently off sick) . I was under the impression that the test track included the sharpest available radii. Personally, I wouldn't operate a large locomotive like the Warship over Setrack curves and points but I still consider my comment that it negotiates them successfully, to be valid. I've watched a few models that are intended for Setrack use come to grief on them. (CJL)
  9. Interesting pic of 68226 - missing its door stops and hooks, and one plank of the door. Have the doors been fixed shut, and someone got too hot and kicked out a plank, I wonder? (CJL)
  10. I believe some figures are being worked on, but whether one of them is suitably posed for the firing job, I'm not sure. There's a tendency for most photographs to show crew members posing for the camera, rather than in working poses. (CJL)
  11. I'm not sure what details you believe to be wrongly positioned? There are some details for which we had to standardise the positions to avoid having to make absurd numbers of tools to accommodate minute detail variations - the end doorstops being a case in point. Those details may be wrongly positioned on some models. Some locos had them on the third plank and some on the second and one loco had one on the second and the other on the third! I have asked about the door hooks and my understanding is that they were present on all the locos but in some photographs they are difficult to see. I think we went as far as we could go - and possibly beyond what was reasonable - in order to accommodate as many minor detail variations as possible. This meant supplying some parts as customer-fit extras but that in itself upsets some customers who would rather have a generic one-size-fits-all model and who don't wish to apply self-fit extra details. My personal preference is to have both sets of doors open (in which case the door stops, hooks etc are hidden) so you can see the internal detail better, and (in the rear cab) so that the fireman can adopt his standard position with one foot on the draw hook, as that was the only way he could make room to swing the shovel! (CJL)
  12. ....but they avoided the need to hold passenger trains whilst platform traffic was loaded/unloaded.
  13. It has nothing to do with DCC. Analog control has advanced in the past 50 years and the massive whack of power that was necessary to move an old Hornby-Dublo motor is no longer necessary for modern motors, coreless or otherwise. It certainly isn't necessary to convert your collection to DCC - they'll run very well on a modern analog controller, so will the J70. (CJL)
  14. Coline33 - those are the same three that I started with. However, 68223 has now been renumbered 68217 despite a (minor, to me) detail issue. Apparently 68217 had the middle lamp iron and the 'stop block' for the sliding windows, combined. That would have required tooling a front end without the 'stop block' and a different lamp iron. I think I can live with those detail discrepancies in order to have 68217 which seems to have done quite a lot of work on the tramway. (CJL)
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