Jump to content

Crewlisle

Members
  • Content Count

    526
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

363 Good

2 Followers

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. I have been intrigued about all the suggested methods & materials to build baseboards to make them light, portable & durable, but £92 for a sheet of marine ply (Philou on Sunday) is going over the top! You only use marine ply for boat repairs or if it is liable to get wet. My 00 gauge layout 'Crewlisle' is on 5 separate baseboards built 47 years ago. Over the last 37 years it has been assembled/disassembled for many exhibitions & the baseboards are still as strong, flat & level as the day they were built. And what miraculous material did I use - Sundaela! Perhaps the main reason for their longevity is that the layout is in a spare bedroom. The frames are 50 x 25 softwood; external corners are dovetailed, glued with 'Evostik Resin W' woodworking glue & pinned; inside stiffener joints are cross halving joints, glued & pinned; the external frames are NOT cross-halved but retain their full 50mm depth along their length to retain their maximum strength. The Sundaela is 15mm thick & is glued & pinned directly to the framework without any plywood underneath or on top. It has made cutting holes for motors, etc. & for inserting track pins easy. If I was starting again I would probably use 6 or 8mm ply. With Sundaela you require stiffening at about 300mm between centres, with ply about 500mm. To build baseboards using 'Sundaela' boards you require to be a skilful woodworker to cut joints & accurate assembly of the framework. These skills are in short supply these days! Peter
  2. Can someone recommend a suitable sound decoder & loud speaker to fit in the tender without having to hack around the inside too much as I want to retain the steam coal pusher. Peter
  3. Why spend money on loco or stock storage boxes? Use what is normally available for free from offices - empty A4 copier paper boxes. With reference to the attached photos, cut the box down to roughly the same depth as the lid so that locos can 'stand' on the bottom, separated by cut strips of cardboard from the remains of the discarded box. At the front & rear of the locos use small pieces of foam or tear off small bits of newspaper & screw them up to act as pads during transport. For different length locos use foam packing to stop them moving about in the box. Most LMS, LNER & BR Pacifics have to be stored diagonally with suitable packing because of their length. Do a similar thing for coaches & freight stock except you put some bubble wrap on the bottom, lay the coaches/freight stock on their sides separated by cardboard strips, lay another piece of bubble wrap before you add the second 'layer' of coaches/freight stock & another layer of bubble wrap before you put the lid on. The coaches/freight stock are separated by cardboard strips cut from the rest of the discarded box. Using bubble wrap between layers protects the paintwork/transfers. Using this method is cheap & protects your stock. Only store a maximum of two layers of coaches/freight stock in each box. If you want, you can stack as many boxes as you like on top of each other in a cupboard. Write on the edge or top of the boxes what locos/stock is inside. Some of you will say that exposing the paintwork/transfers on your stock to cardboard will cause a 'reaction' & damage their finish. Let's just say that after over 30 years of exhibiting 'Crewlisle' at exhibitions with a large number of locos & stock stored in this way when not in use, I have not had one item damaged or paintwork affected by them being in direct contact with the cardboard. At exhibitions It also makes it easy to remove & replace stock. Peter
  4. I have started to create new nameboards for my layout. I have completed the actual name but want to buy some 60mm x 40mm self adhesive vinyl stickers or waterslide transfers as per the photo. Anyone know where I can buy them? Peter
  5. My 00 gauge layout 'Crewlisle' is on 5 separate baseboards built 47 years ago. Over the last 37 years it has been assembled/disassembled for many exhibitions & the baseboards are still as strong, flat & level as the day they were built. And what miraculous material did I use - Sundaela! Perhaps the main reason for their longevity is that the layout is in a spare bedroom. The frames are 50 x 25 softwood; external corners are dovetailed, glued with 'Evostik Resin W' woodworking glue & pinned; inside stiffener joints are cross halving joints, glued & pinned; the external frames are NOT cross-halved but retain their full 50mm depth along their length to retain their maximum strength. The Sundaela is 15mm thick & is glued & pinned directly to the framework without any plywood underneath or on top. It has made cutting holes for motors, etc. & for inserting track pins easy. If I was starting again I would probably use 6 or 8mm ply. With Sundaela you require stiffening at about 300mm between centres, with ply about 500mm. To build baseboards using 'Sundaela' boards you require to be a skilful woodworker to cut joints & accurate assembly of the framework. These skills are in short supply these days! Peter
  6. My 8ft 6ins x 7ft 6ins DCC layout Crewlisle is on three inter connected levels with the mid level continuous run representing the WCML with OLE. To get all my design in such a relatively small area, all my track is curved where it passes over the baseboard joints so it would have been unwise to use the standard method of soldering track to copper clad Paxolin at the baseboard edges due to the track having to be cut at very shallow angles ‑ especially running trains at realistic speeds on the WCML! The slightest misalignment would be disastrous. The track (Peco Code 100) & foam underlay (2mm polystyrene wall insulation) were laid over the joint, but the foam was not stuck 80mm either side of the baseboard joint. The track was cut 80mm each side of the baseboard joint with a razor saw and the short section lifted out and reinforced with thin card on the underside & ballasted. The rail ends of this section were carefully filed, rail connectors soldered to one end and sleeper chairs cut at the other end to allow the fitting of sliding fish plates. This allowed accurate and reliable track alignment & electrical continuity every time by having the track continuously joined with normal rail connectors. As the adverts say, "You cannot see the join!". I have been exhibiting for over 30 years & have had no trouble with this method of connection when having to dismantle/assemble the layout for exhibitions. I even have three points on the high level & a pair of crossover points (not cut) on the mid level WCML fitted across baseboard joints in the same way. The baseboards themselves are aligned with cast brass hinges with their hinge pins replaced by 50mm x 1.5mm steel pins bent at one end to make them easy to remove. Peter
  7. John. , There have been quite a number of posts on this forum quoting social distancing, but I think yours is the first to mention 'social groups'. Among layout operators, traders & of course visitors, about 25% are over 65. How could an exhibition be financially viable when social distancing is added? In recent days there has been speculation that no theatres or cinemas will be allowed to open until the end of the year. Peter
  8. Andy, Forget Tracksetta curves or formulae for transition curves, you are building a model railway not planning the trackwork for HS2! Instead of Tracksetta curves, do it the simple & cheap way. Cut some rectangular pieces of cardboard or hardboard & then cut out an internal radius or outside radius of your radii required. Bend & pin your track to the outside or inside of the templates; it is not going to have kinks in it (only possibly if you come down to 10" radius!). If it doesn't fit, adjust the track/points as required. I have seen modellers saying about the complex formulae for transition curves - take no notice; they are not required. If you want reasonable looking transition curves from one piece of straight track to another do the following: 1. Make sure that the last rail joints on the straight track are about 150mm from where you want your curve to start from. 2. Carefully bend your track, gradually reducing the radius of the curve to the final radius. This could be from about 2500 mm down to your minimum radius of 500mm. Look along the curve to ensure that there are no kinks in it & it is a 'fair' curve.. They have a saying in the shipbuilding or ship repair business, "If a curve looks right, it is right!". 3. Of the many exhibitions I have atended with 'Crewlisle', I have lost count of the number of questions I have had about how I built such good looking transition curves. Peter
  9. If you want 100% accuracy it is possible that the Jubilee & the Standard Tank in BR days will have been repaired/overhauled/ repainted at the ex Caledonian St Rollox loco works in Glasgow. If so, these locos will have the unique 10" high cabside numbers which you rarely see on Scottish based layouts. However, locos overhauled/repainted at other ex LMS works in Scotland (such as Kilmarnock, Inverness or Inverurie) had the standard 8" high BR cabside numbers. The WD Austerities were normally overhauled at Crewe Loco Works. As a trainspotter from the 1950s I can confirm that Scottish based Jubilees & Black Fives occasionally ventured as far south as Leicester on the daily 'Carlisle Goods' or St Pancras on the Midland Main Line. In the mid fifties there was a verified sighting of a Clan on a south bound express at St Albans. Sad to say I missed it! Peter
  10. What are the blatant errors on the 87? Obvious, a rubbish plastic pantograph that would put a Thomas the Tank Engine to shame! What continental model manufacturer would dare to present a scale electric overhead model loco without a functioning metal sprung pantograph? Surely someone at Hornby should have had the common sense to have sub contracted Sommerfeldt to produce a metal pantograph - even if it added £5 to the cost of each loco? Peter
  11. I accept it is completely out of exhibition managers control to see so many exhibitions cancelled or postponed in view of the Coroana Virus. However, may I make a suggestion. Some clubs have said that they are trying to reschedule their cancelled exhibitions, for example Ally Pally, to a later date in the year. No one knows how long this emergency will go on for. Wouldn't it be better for everybody if they forgot about the exhibitors to this years exhibitions & automatically invite them to their 2021 exhibition? All large exhibitions like Ally Pally & the NEC give invites to layouts years in advance. I was invited to the NEC for this year 4 years ago. This would mean disappointment to this years exhibitors & all current invites should be moved one year to the right. This would make planning easier for exhibition organisers. Peter
  12. How many modellers would want to faff around with the correct valve gear settings in 00 gauge before any model moved?. I would think it would be o.ooooo1 per cent. The vast number of modellers would not even notice it, except wondering why nothing was moving!. In 1 gauge or larger the serious modellers would expect it, but 00 gauge, forget it. I would not expect Hornby or Bachmann to waste money on the suggestion or even think about it. The rivet counters have gone too far this time. Peter
  13. Just a superficial observation, be very careful with the size of the cabside numbers. Locos repaired at St Rollox works in Glasgow (ex Caledonian works) after repainting had 10" thicker cabside numbers instead of the standard BR numbers which were 8" high. Very few Scottish based layouts I have seen have locos with these larger numbers. I spent my train spotting days in the 1950s on the Midland & WCML. When we saw a loco with the 10" high cab side numerals we all cheered & shouted that it must be a 'cop' before we found out what it was! Oh happy days. Peter
  14. Look at Google for the track plan & photos of my 00 Gauge DCC layout 'Crewlisle' with three interconnected levels. Size is 8'6 x 7'6. Do what I did many years ago when starting my layout, I listed what I wanted from my train spotting days at Market Harborough in 1954 to 1960 with regular visits to Peterborough for the ECML & Rugby or Crewe for the WCML. That is a 4 platform terminus to take 6 coach expresses, steam shed, diesel shed, turntable, goods yard, connection to a double track roundy-roundy WCML with through station & small goods yard, portable catenary & reversing loop. If you have a terminus, trains leave so must have to come back! When planning the layout, I used Peco paper point templates where I wanted them & tried flexible track between them to see if it could be done. If not, I repositioned the templates until I could get a fair curve between them. Simple but practical. Before anyone rushes to condemn my layout for a multitude of reasons like being unrealistic or too crowded, the original editor of Railway Modeller & author of many track plan books Cyril Freezer stopped at my layout at the Bristol Exhibition over 20 years ago & after discussing it with me for 20 minutes said, "You have a lot of railway in a small area but it does not look out of place". That was praise indeed from the man himself! To me, fiddle yards are wasted space; use cassettes instead. I use 12 on a rack under the baseboard each in turn used as part of the reversing loop inside the operating well. Each is 1370mm long & hold a Class 47 + 4 coaches or 12 short wheelbase wagons. They are replenished from the stock box as required. The longest trains I run are 6 coach expresses, Midland Pullman, HST & APT. Two can be held on the reversing loop or in two separate 1800mm cassettes made from plastic cable conduit. Using cassettes you can run as much stock as you want. I run 52 locos from Stanier Pacifics, blue & green diesels, AC electrics & finishing with the APT together with 49 passenger/parcel coaches together with 112 wagons of various sizes. I am the first to admit that it is not prototypical or the most detailed but was built to entertain. At exhibitions my operating team run a minimum of 2 & sometimes as many as 4 trains/locos simultaneously. There are plenty of photos on line & it will be appearing at the NEC in November for its 6th appearance there & last exhibition as the baseboards seem to get heavier for each exhibition! Description of the layout appeared in Hornby Magazine HM84 in June 2014 & catenary (all portable & pantographs in contact with overhead wires) in Model Rail 192 in February 2014 or I can send them via PM including details of how to build the cassettes & other features of the layout. Peter
  15. On the Hornby Forum last year on 16th June after the liquidation of DJM Models, I wrote a post about the possibility of Hornby bringing back their APT model. This was poo-pooed by a number of replies saying that it wouldn't sell, it would be too expensive, the actual APT only ran for about 4 years & other excuses for not bringing this iconic train back into production. On the 26th June I posted the following reply to some of their reasons: Naturally there is a mixture of positive and negative comments to my original post; unfortunately most appear to be negative. Yes, there were quite a number of variations to choose from the DJModels APT; I chose the 5 car version to fit my existing Hornby APT cassette on 'Crewlisle'. It did run as a test train of 5 cars as I have seen a photo. The two comments I do disagree with is that it would be too expensive and was only running for a short period of time 36 years ago. The example I quote to refute these arguments is the Midland Blue Pullman which first ran 59 years ago from 1960 until 1966 when the WCML electrification from Euston to Manchester/Liverpool was completed. Bachmann introduced their 6 car model in 2014 and I paid just under £200 with a rrp of £270 (I think) for the first run which quickly sold out. It was so popular that they did a re-run a few years later. An 00 gauge 5 car APT-P might be worth considering with modern motors, DCC onboard, lights and similar carriage connections to the Blue Pullman (plus of course the tilt mechanism). One thing which Hornby should do is please fit a metal sprung pantograph for those of us who have catenary to make it look right! That is the only reason I did not buy their new Class 87 because it was 10 out of 10 for the model but 0 points for the pathetic plastic pantograph. Peter
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.