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47137

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Posts posted by 47137


  1. A year on, I have just finished building a kit for a BYA covered steel wagon, and I think it is worth posting a photo here to show how a British outline model with bogies copes with curves.

     

    In essence,

    1) the usual code 110 RP-25 wheel is about twice the scale width of a prototype wheel

    2) we expect model trains to go round curves far tighter than the prototype

    3) the solebars of a model are often thicker than their scale thickness

     

    This leads us to expect to run out of width, but in truth my BYA negotiates a radius 2 curve without difficulty. I hollowed out the solebars to let it negotiate a radius 1 curve too:

    DSCF9980.jpg.a1a94aefe36716f327bdae4b5312715e.jpg

     

    I think this helps to show, 1:87 scale is a practical proposition for modern prototypes. I am enjoying a layout where the overall appearance of models on the track is correct (scale gauge) and I can exploit tight curves on hidden tracks.

     

    - Richard.

    • Like 1

  2. I like the engine shed. I think it's "necessary" to justify the kick-back, this will be difficult to shunt with wagons.

     

    Could you miss out the footpath along the top of the embankment? You could have a fence here to suggest the path beyond, and then soften the angle of the embankment.

     

    Or even arrange for a flight of steps from the footbridge descending between the tracks, towards the Y point at the front of the layout. This ought to help with blocking the view too.

     

    I can imagine an ash pit in front of the engine shed and a small but substantial-looking water tower in front of the track here too.

     

    - Richard.

    • Like 1
    • Agree 1
    • Thanks 1

  3. 1 hour ago, Mick Bonwick said:

    I have just added another topic to the sidebar in my blog, but the spacing between the links has doubled compared with those that were done a while ago. I have tried all sorts of things to change the new entries back to single spacing ,but failed dismally. Does anybody have an idea about how this change can be made? I don't think I've done anything different this time, but it's entirely possible that I have!

     

    I my own blog, I use SHIFT+ENTER to create new lines in the sidebar, and then a simple ENTER when I want to begin a new block of text. In the editor both sorts of new line look the same:

    1234224293_Screenshot2019-12-0119_24_18.png.7ac4e3406657794b682bda7d46719c3b.png

     

    But the web site renders them like this, with extra space before "Main Baseboard":

    1736965776_Screenshot2019-12-0119_24_42.png.1dea374b6c600426c2f3929b4e43ec75.png

     

    I have done quite a lot of faffing around to get this sidebar looking presentable, but now it is done I can add slot in new topics when I write them. Hope this helps.

     

    - Richard.


  4. 18 minutes ago, MGR Hooper! said:

    I just 3D printed a few of them (different style). I can always edit and upload them to my Shapeways shop if you want. If you send a few pics I can make them as accurate as possible too.

     

    Cheers!

    This is a kind offer and I have found your buffers on Shapeways. Unfortunately Shapeways need a whopping £15.66 to send them to the UK, and really this too much for me, at least at the moment. Let me try and make something, I'll report back.

     

    - Richard.


  5. One more photo of the lighting cover. This is the power inlet, underneath the front left of the cover. I find glass plates quite useful where there is a panel-mounted component but no panel, this one has a keyhole slot and didn't need any modification to attach the connector.

     

    - Richard.

     

    DSCF9934.jpg.1b20f77d03e72e7f0f52e05e32d48a47.jpg


  6. 59 minutes ago, Guy Rixon said:

    Perhaps the heads could be filed down from larger, round heads in metal? Buffer heads in fine plastic or resin tend to be fragile and prints of that size in tough plastic don't look good.

     

    58 minutes ago, Fat Controller said:

    https://www.wizardmodels.ltd/ might do something. Another possibility would be to get some round buffers of about the right size and cut out some thin brass sheet to form the heads.

     

    Guys you have given me an idea.

     

    Electrotren modern wagon buffer heads are 6 mm (max) x 4 mm. I could try putting some thin styrene rectangles on top of these, there will be minimal overhang and I might even replicate the curved faces.

     

    - Richard.

     


  7. 9 hours ago, JeffP said:

    Try Markits

     

    A nice suggestion but I suspect even Markits don't know what they make - their web site tells us "Link to dowload old catalogue have been removed until we can publish the new catalogue".

     

    Only round and oval buffers in their 2013 catalogue.

     

    I'm thinking along the lines of spare parts for something RTR but I have no idea what the source model would be.

     

    - Richard.


  8. I wonder if someone could tell me where I could look for some buffers with rectangular heads measuring 7 x 4 mm. Just the heads would be fine, or if they were complete then around 7.5 mm deep front to back.

     

    The size is important (within 0.5 mm or so) but the construction and the material they are made from is not.

     

    - Richard.


  9. It's funny how two model train fans can find much the same product just right and completely useless. The controller I received does flash patterns, flash rate, brightness and colour temperature, of which only the last is useful for the layout and touching the wrong button sends me into a cycle of unwanted strobe effects.

     

    I tried to send the lighting unit back for a refund, but the return address is to China, not to London as indicated in the listing - international postage throwing good money after bad.

     

    For the layout, I'll stay with the original lighting strip and my blobs of amber paint, but I can tuck the new lighting strip away and maybe find a better controller for it one day.

     

    - Richard.

    • Friendly/supportive 2

  10. On 06/11/2019 at 12:39, jrb said:

    For what it's worth, on my layout I bought some bi-colour led strip off eBay. It has warm white and cool white chips alternately down the length, wired on separate channels. The strip is driven by a controller with a remote, so you can alter the colour temperature of the light, from warm to cool, or anywhere in between (and you can adjust the brightness, too). I did put links on my layout thread to the items I bought, but they're out of date now.

     

    Edit: This isn't the seller I used, but this is the same led strip. And the controller is better than the one I got: https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.co.uk%2Fulk%2Fitm%2F392332849547

     

    JRB

     

    I have bought one of these and it as finally arrived. I suspect the parcel has come from China although the eBay seller claims to be in the UK!

     

    To be honest, you may well have got the better version. The controller I received seems to be able to pulse the lights in various patterns but not give a steady light with the ability to change the colour temperature. In fact I am tempted to say it is utter rubbish, but I might be able to use the strip in the living room with a simple two-way switch to change the mood.

     

    I am pondering whether to send it all back for a refund :-)

     

    - Richard.

    • Like 1
    • Friendly/supportive 2

  11. On 08/11/2019 at 13:14, mjcampbell said:

    Neat, I love the switches too!

    I think they give the model a bit of a retro look. They remind me of the buying electrical bits and pieces in Woolworths back in the 1970s, there were open trays of bulb holders and terminal blocks and so on arranged like a pick and mix.

     

    - Richard.


  12. I will be happy with a 42 ft turntable.

     

    I have purchased and downloaded a detailed drawing of a turntable from the Great Eastern Railway Society.

    https://www.gersociety.org.uk/index.php/files-emporium-home/lg032-turntable

     

    This is for a 55 ft turntable designed and constructed by the GER at Stratford Works and used after 1903. A model based on this but shorter will be much easier for me to build than the Cowans Sheldon one because the timbers of the walkways are running along the turntable not across it. Also, the rail section will be hidden by the walkways and I can make a stronger assembly with FB rail.

     

    Obviously this is fundamentally a GER design, but the general appearance matches up with what I think a British turntable can look like. So really, this drawing has answered my original questions well enough to make a start.

     

    Thanks to everyone for the variety of suggestions and ideas :-)

     

    For anyone reading this and pondering modelling solutions, I've just found a recent complementary thread here:

    https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/148676-small-turntable/

    I have a Peco H0m turntable, and I'm hoping to adapt this (if this model seems rather small, this is for a 1:87 not 1:76 layout).

     

    - Richard.


  13. 52 minutes ago, eastglosmog said:

    There is a picture of the 45' turntable at Fairford in 1947  (not to be confused with the 55' one installed later) in Karau's Great Western Branch Line Termini Vol 1.  The decking obscures whether it is bullhead or flat bottom rail, though I suspect the former.

     

    I've found a technical drawing of a Cowans Sheldon turntable here:

    https://www.tulliehouse.co.uk/objects/technical-drawing-2

     

    Trying to scale the drawing from the track gauge, the length of the turntable seems to be 43 feet, I'll guess this is the 42 foot design.

     

    Please ... not having a copy of Karau's book to hand, does the turntable at Fairford look anything like this drawing?

     

    - Richard.


  14. I now have a Peco H0m turntable to form the basis of a 16.5 mm gauge model. It does look promising, and I'm at a bit of a loss as to why I've not seen examples at shows or written up on the RMweb. It makes for a nice little model, much more at home on a branch line setting than the usual 70ft designs.

     

    To avoid cross-posting or taking Pete's original post off-topic, I've posted my prototype questions here:

    https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/149320-42-ft-pre-grouping-turntable-details/

     

    - Richard.


  15. I am looking for a nice clear photo or two of a pre-grouping turntable around 42 maybe 45 feet long, where I can confirm these details:

    - FB or BH rail

    - arrangement of the timbers holding the rails and forming the areas along the sides where people could walk

    - arrangement of the hand rails (if any)

     

    Ideally a Southern Railway location, but this is of quite minor importance. Just a photo of what they looked like, I suppose ideally in service rather than in preservation.

     

    I understand, a 42 ft design was a standard product of Cowans Sheldon and these were installed across Great Britain. I am finding a dearth of illustrations in my bookshelves and on line, it is as though these weren't popular with photographers. If no photos, pointers to one or two books with photos would be great.

     

    - Richard.


  16. Two more photos, extended and stowed. All of the trim is obechi I bought for model-making. I can pull the cover off completely, this leaves the white shelf fixed in place, and you can see the model from above.

     

    For the avoidance of doubt, I didn't design this! I made it up as I went along and really, it has come out better than I expected.

     

    - Richard.

     

    P1010362.JPG.e4663f880bc18beb0bd3f91819736090.JPG

     

    P1010361.JPG.69ba0117460f7562bd8a7efaba7974b3.JPG

    • Like 2

  17. On 06/11/2019 at 12:39, jrb said:

    For what it's worth, on my layout I bought some bi-colour led strip off eBay. It has warm white and cool white chips alternately down the length, wired on separate channels. The strip is driven by a controller with a remote, so you can alter the colour temperature of the light, from warm to cool, or anywhere in between (and you can adjust the brightness, too). I did put links on my layout thread to the items I bought, but they're out of date now.

     

    Edit: This isn't the seller I used, but this is the same led strip. And the controller is better than the one I got: https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.co.uk%2Fulk%2Fitm%2F392332849547

     

    JRB

     

    My lighting cover now has its cosmetic trimmings - some sticky backed plastic on the top and a strip of aluminium along the front. So it is a lot easier on the eye. I will call this "finished" but I have ordered up one of these controllable warm/cool LED strips to experiment with. It might be good for the main baseboard or even the living room.

     

    - Richard.

     

    P1010357.JPG.037db2c7b649d144c9d2fa8844111d32.JPG

    • Like 5
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