Jump to content

jwealleans

Members
  • Posts

    6,514
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

jwealleans last won the day on May 9 2013

jwealleans had the most liked content!

6 Followers

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

jwealleans's Achievements

11.8k

Reputation

  1. I've had a similar sort of issue with a tight spot where the body on a Crownline J19 developed a twist and applied it to the chassis when they were attached. Backing off one screw about a quarter of a turn solved the problem. It can be very easy to focus on one potential cause and miss what might be a much simpler one.
  2. It's long been a source of puzzlement to me that Ron Rising built Corfe to OO standards, given that he was involved with Pendon and therefore must have been familiar with EM. The trackwork is handbuilt and so is almost all the stock, so it's not as though he was trying to cater for having RTR on there. Most of the RTR from the 1960s wouldn't run on it anyway, the wheels are too coarse. That said, Corfe is now open again and I have my first shift on Sunday after 16 months away from the place.
  3. I haven't had a problem for a good three weeks now. Cue a load of occurrences, but it's funny how it only affects some users, isn't it?
  4. That's what I was skirting round saying, but it is the giveaway.
  5. I've had a couple of second hand locos like that. A Q1 which would only go in a straight line because the builder had used the kit loco-tender coupling, which had made the whole thing rigid. Replace with a hook and goalpost and she trundles round Grantham quite happily. I also had a J6 with no sideplay at al in the (cast whitemetal) chassis. Shame as it ran beautifully on straight track. New set of frames from Branchlines and it's all set to appear the next time Grantham goes out.
  6. Is the Q6 a Chivers, or the NuCast kit?
  7. Not according to the Railway Heritage Register.
  8. https://www.facebook.com/AshfordInternationalModelRailwayExcellenceCentre/
  9. There's no doubt that that will be the case for the majority of models, especially RTR. However I do think that those associated with certain names will either survive or be remembered. Look at Buckingham, at the LNWR models by Jack Nelson and J P Richards, at the Madder Valley and Gainsborough. There's still interest in a Beeson locomotive, for example, even though most of us (myself included) only have a vague idea of who Beeson was. I also think that there's a significant minority who find much more fulfilment in a physical model and the achievement of making it work than any VR experience, however immersive. That may not express itself in model railways, but I do believe that it will continue to exist.
  10. Absolutely. I am lucky enough to have acquired locos built by yourself, by Graham Varley and Mike Edge and painted by Ian Rathbone and Larry Goddard. That association, quite apart from the quality of the build and finish, makes them stand out in my collection. It also ensures that most of them will not be altered or weathered in any significant way.
  11. You know the answer to that. It's good for you.
  12. Bill is correct about the brown colour for vehicles with a short expected lifespan. The latest picture I have of a vehicle undisputably in LNER teak is summer 1956.
  13. I was keeping an eye on that. It's an LNER Toad B.
  14. What Tony describes is very much how we operate Asenby. There's a passenger service - if we have the extended version with the junction, there are two passenger trains - but in the main it's a small tank and six or seven wagons, then a pleasant 20 minutes or half an hour shunting while the fiddle yard man catches up on his sleep. It's both relaxing and absorbing at the same time - especially if he's so soundly asleep that you can send back a train which is one wagon too long for the yard without him noticing. That's always a result.
×
×
  • Create New...