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woodenhead

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Blog Comments posted by woodenhead

  1. I share @Harlequin's view on the coal storage - would the GWR have employed two pilots to handle getting the coal to the coaling stage - very inefficient unless the shed was big enough to warrant having more than one locomotive assigned to pilot duties as well as simply moving coal.  Looking through my Historical Survey of GWR sheds they didn't do it*, the sheds were designed to be efficient - perhaps keep the single track that goes behind the stage to reach the current three tracks would be enough to store your coal wagons, that would be similar to Westbury.  Closest to your main shed layout is Exeter, is that by plan or chance?  It did use a kickback but the sidings were in the same direction as the stage so one locomotive could be used to feed in wagons from the coal stack. 

     

    But then there is always the exception isn't there!  Penzance, it's coal stacks were in the opposite direction and did require either a second loco or the use of the turntable to run around the wagons.

     

    So carry on please, as you were, nothing to see here.  :lol:

     

    *read on as I am about to contradict myself!

    • Like 1
  2. My school was once buzzed by a couple of Starfighters back c 1980.

     

    I guess if you were in Germany this may not be that unusual, but I was in the middle of Manchester when they screamed overhead.  Turns out they were West German and had been over the UK on an exercise, gotten lost and were using railway lines as a guide but ended up low level over Manchester following the Styal loop.

    • Like 4
  3. 12 minutes ago, AY Mod said:

    I do like these transitory misguided elements of putting lipstick on pigs in your 60s/70s municipal wastelands; a bit like the Hepworth statues that stood in the Mander Centre for snotty kids (like me) to clamber all over when Dad had popped into Tesco.

    Where I live now people still reminisce about two fiberglass sea lions that used to be located in the town square outside the run down Gateway supermarket. 

  4. Not seen it yet, saw it advertised so all set up at 8:55 last night to watch it, first time I have put the TV on in weeks and the wife goes I am not watching that cr*p!!

     

    What followed was ten minutes of frantic resetting and retuning the TV box as it had frozen so I could record Red Dwarf and then ended up watching Groundhog day for the umpteenth time as she had not seen that.

     

    The wife dislikes TV but oddly whenever I actually switch it on to watch something she wants to watch a film on Netflix and then moans when there is nothing she likes.

    • Friendly/supportive 1
  5. "It seemed odd, seeing the big names absent - all second and third-tier operators working small fields and decommissioning works, now. Definite feeling of the good times having left town for the last time. "

     

    Which is not how the Scottish Parliament would have you see it, they would have you believe the best times are still to come.

     

    Did the UK really waste all the oil and gas?  

  6. 13 hours ago, rockershovel said:

    A small bouquet for a recent “find”, Travelodge at Bristol Filton. Hard to find amid a tangle of new development and temporary works, inadequate parking and a sweltering stairwell with two external glazed walls, but large rooms, WITH aircon ... also catering morning and evening, not something usual in Travelodge plus Costa and Subway adjacent.

     

    I’d suspect that it owes its development to the RR Engines works, directly opposite. Probably intended to serve visiting reps and engineers. 

    I once stayed in aTravelodge - it's evening dining came courtesy of Dominos and breakfast arrived in a box with one of those cereal/milk combinations.

  7. I think there are two types of Premier Inn -

    • The family type: in town, air conditioning
    • The white van man type: cheaper, industrial areas, no air conditioning.

    I was just checking out one I use on occasion when in outer London which is definitely the latter and just noticed it doesn't advertise air con either and is on a ring road.

    • Agree 2
  8. Facebook is just a means for people to go 'look at me', mostly it is vacuous content but there is some interesting content within groups if you can avoid the politically charged echo chamber groups.  I haven't posted anything to Facebook other than responding politely where I have been tagged in photos and I feel much better for it.  Facebook is designed to trigger dopamine rushes like all the online games that exist (candy crush et al),, this rush keeps you on the application which is what they want in order to secure advertising revenue.

     

    Instagram is all about selling 'your best life', again not a real representation of life.

     

    I haven't done Twitter but I guess it works in the same way

     

    Forums like this though you don't want to see lots of posts going 'I like this', it will detract from the content, using Dave F 's ongoing photographs thread, each post can get tens of likes, it would be impossible to digest the thread if those showing appreciation for the images had to type out a response.

    • Like 1
    • Agree 3
  9. I think you've put the main reason for your lack of motivation third on the list - depression, you can find away around the other reasons if the motivation was there.

     

    I've always struggled when it comes to the scenery - I would begin my layout enthusiastically and then reach the scenic stage where my confidence would wain and before I knew it a new idea for a new layout took hold and off I went in a new direction.  It was only last year that I finally accepted that I couldn't keep buying stuff for each new project and then see myself with too much stock and no railway to run it, then I sold off a good proportion of my stock.

     

    During some counselling last summer I had an epiphany - my incessant need to purchase was dopamine driven, it was the thrill of the finding and making the purchase - once I got the item it lacked any thrill and then made me feel bad that I had bought something I didn't really need - it's a sign of an addiction.

     

    I've also accepted that when I become obsessed with a new layout plan it is probably a sign that I am depressed and this is how I look inward into myself, falling back onto a comfortable pattern of behaviours.

     

    What's changed in the past few months is that knowing why I purchase stuff and why I make plans that I wont actually deliver is part of repeating patterns of behaviour that do more harm than good.  I've not purchased any railway stock since last summer, what I am buying in limited amounts are scenic items - paints, gravel etc and I am working towards finishing a railway and only once it is finished can I think about my next railway which will utilise some of my N stock.

     

    Take the rest you owe yourself, sort out your head and then come back to modelling but pick something small and achievable, look at the Billy Bookcase threads - simple baseboard, simple track.

     

    I typically use NHY581's Mutton as what can be achieved with simple track and baseboards, but I've also been looking a Ladmanlow sidings (Mutton inspired actually) as well

     

    Can I also recommend you find yourself a local mindfulness or Buddhist group - those groups can transform people's lives.

    • Like 1
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