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Andy Hayter

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Everything posted by Andy Hayter

  1. I agree about the spike in sales. I think there is no doubt that panic buying has caused widespread stockouts. However for me the test will be how quickly we get back to normality. We are fast approaching the point where everyone's tank is pretty full so purchasing will return to a level which reflects actual consumption. If it is a week maybe even two weeks for forecourts to return to normal, then there were plenty of HGV drivers and it was just a media story that caused panic. If it takes longer to restock the forecourts it means the issue was genuinely the ability to move fuel from the refineries to the petrol stations. Based on current information my money is on the latter.
  2. Any fold that is subject to frequent bending/flexing needs a solder filet to strengthen the joint. Otherwise the metal suffers from work hardening - bending back and forth causing the metal to fracture and fail. Most frequently used on those nails we cannot get out of a piece of wood. Bend back and forth until the nail breaks at the bend point.
  3. No, no and thrice no. East of the Medway - man of Kent West - Kentish man Easy to remember Kentish town (nothing to do with Kent) is in London. West of the Medway.
  4. But that is just one side of the coin Alistair. The other is that we all (me included) require more stuff. And stuff needs moving from the producer to the store/warehouse and from there to us. More stuff means more trucks means more drivers - except that there aren't more drivers, so in consequence there will be less stuff.
  5. I share your pain in so many ways Rich. I remember vividly 1.2.2020. It was the day for the AGM of our committee for festivals. As I was walking to the meeting room I met the mayor who informed me that the Prefect had asked her to inform me that I had now lost my rights to vote in local elections. I know I replied. Yesterday I was a European. Today I am just a foreigner.
  6. TARIC = TARif Intégré Communautaire = integrated community tariff
  7. In my list of items only one (Peco wagon) can be classed as electric trains and accessories. That was the point of the post.
  8. The codes are international Elaine. How they are applied or not to small shipments may well not be.
  9. The HS codes are indeed a real nightmare for the (wo)man in the street- or your friendly post office counter staff. Designed for the commercial import/export of volume goods from perhaps a case load up to a container load, they are now being applied to individual items. Imagine the problems of companies such as Eileen's Emporium. He receives an export order for the following: 1 pack 0.4mm brass wire 1 tin solder paste 1 sheet .5mm nickel silver 1 length fine link copper wire 1 PECO wagon kit 1 sheet transfers Every single item has a different HS code! Nightmare! No wonder he could not process export orders for months. Edit to add: The codes are easily found with a search engine. Finding the right code for the item being sent is another matter. You will not find model railways on the .gov.uk listing but you will find electric trains - not necessarily what you will look for when sending a coach to a customer.
  10. Irishmail (an unfortunate monika in these circumstances) I wonder if the root problem is AN or whether it is Irish Customs. Certainly from what has been written AN are not fault free when they return items that they have promised to deliver. One thing the representative has said is however completely correct. If Customs won't accept the documentation they cannot deliver it.
  11. Assuming this is model railway items - including accessories - the code is 9503003000 Electric trains, including tracks, signals and other accessories therefor; reduced-size (scale) model assembly kits
  12. " I have to now wait for the timber yard to have his stock and deliver my bits to me - I think he said by the end of the week " But did he say which week? This France after all. Where in terms of construction and materials, Manana has been developed into a science. Andy
  13. I have not been subjected to the recent spate of advertising. Possibly this is because of the security settings I have on my PC. What has occurred tonight - and it may be linked to the advertising and its solutions - is that a blank banner has appeared across the top of the page. No way to remove it and of course it obscures what is below. So when I page down, part of the new page is obscured. Sorry to bring yet another problem Andy.
  14. Thanks for that Gordon. Regarding wagons, there could be quite a range used. From the French range the low sided and flats from the so called TP range might well be used in significant numbers. Of American origin and dating from 1917, they were left in Europe at the end of hostilities. https://rma-49.fr/les-wagons-a-bogies-dorigine-americaine-dits-tp-1917/
  15. You may be able to pick something out of the wreckage in this shot of Brest https://ww2db.com/image.php?image_id=262 Locos would most likely be French this far west but I would not discount some German locos getting to the coast given the importance of places such as Brest to the German navy. Stock might well be a very mixed bag from across the Axis controlled rail network.
  16. I will see what I can find but photos of railways during WW2 were understandably rather rare - restricted availability of film, strictures on taking pictures of logistics items etc. Pictures of docks will be even less common given that all of them would have been under military control.
  17. So far the only "problem" I have had is not being charged when I should have been. Thank you La Poste/French Customs. Sorry no comfort for you. It does seem however that there is more than a little confusion around.
  18. Unlikely that any individual farmer would be able to extract the sugar and crystallise it successfully. On the face of it a simple extraction process is anything but and it seems is only likely to be successful on an industrial scale. There was a program some years ago on the TV where two teams of young scientists competed. One to get sugar from beet and the other to get sugar from cane. The caners succeeded but the beeters failed to get the sugar to crystallise.
  19. For a South coast port during WW2 the loco is also very improbable. Built by The Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway, they and the company were absorbed into the London, Midland and Scottish Railway - which well describes where they might have been found.
  20. Clearly with a recalcitrant Lord Malatease whose estate spanned all of the southern part of CA and indeed further south, the WNR had no choice but to circumnavigate his empire when he refused all overtures to cross his land.
  21. Delivery charges (postage) should be included in the "value" of an item for assessing VAT.
  22. Oh dear. Any railway modeller could have told them that you don't put the light items of stock at the front of the train. Perhaps they should have put some lead into the underframe!
  23. Gaps in the WTT. Once upon a time in France large sections of the country had no train movements during the middle of the day. This could of course have been due to lunch, but in fact the 4 hour or so gap was used by maintenance teams to do small but essential track or trackside jobs. Given that much of early operations was obtained from the UK, I wonder whether that was also a UK practice.
  24. Limited of course to County Durham. The Easington I lived in was not there but was subject to mining - ironstone. We reckoned that being next to the church would be good juju - after all a miner would not want his relatives graves to drop into the workings!
  25. Indeed. Luckily we can still get Blue Stilton (there is a white one as well so we should be precise in CA) here despite Brex(sh)it. I hope it continues. I fear it may not. Cheddar and mature red Leicester - called old Rutland for some reason - are also still available to us British neighbours whose status has developed from Europeans to just foreigners. There are many superb French cheeses - mild and mature - but these three English cheeses cannot be matched - any more than some UK cheese could imitate Comte, Roquefort or a good Brie.
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