Jump to content

DavidBird

Members
  • Content Count

    458
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

301 Good

Profile Information

  • Location
    ex-Chilwellian, now at the End of the Line.

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. No, not that one. Wish it was!
  2. Just above the left-most oil tank... ;-) https://www.google.com/maps/@57.0053705,-5.830873,3a,75y,122.35h,87.23t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s9C4kAiOQpHhL9-l2StsZzg!2e0!7i13312!8i6656
  3. You have a PM... Well, not quite, if you know where to look
  4. No it won't. You'll miss my house out if you do that! Actually, that's ok as it wasn't built in 1983...
  5. Junctions seem to have been named either after the location - eg Netherfield Junction, Sneinton Junction, or after where the branch leads to - eg Mansfield Junction. So why is it called Rectory junction? I can find no reference to a vicarage or rectory nearby by looking on old-maps.
  6. Junctions seem to have been named either after the location - eg Netherfield Junction, Sneinton Junction, or after where the branch leads to - eg Mansfield Junction. So why is it called Rectory junction? I can find no reference to a vicarage or rectory nearby by looking on old-maps.
  7. Many thank Rob 30851, and also to Three Cocks Junction (yes, that is a username) by PM. With their help I now have my guesses confirmed as more or less correct! Many thanks gents.
  8. I've still not located that photo I mentioned before. There is this one on display in the Mallaig Heritage Centre, which shows indistinctly the end of the building in question. It also shows a good view of the building at the Up end of the cattle dock.
  9. I spotted on "a certain well-known internet auction site" an auction for a diagram, and selection of lever plates, from Rectory Junction. I was pipped at the post for getting it, but the seller very kindly took a set of clear photos for me before sending it off to the buyer. I won't post photos here as I haven't (yet) got permission to do so. It is dated March 1964 and also 1/11/71. It shows clear signs of alteration, by painting out removed track and signals. The track layout matches well with the (low-res) diagram on the s-r-s.org website here https://www.s-r-s.org.uk/html/lner/E921.
  10. Many apologies, I've been misreading your posts. I believe there was indeed a short platform at the far end of the loading dock siding, with a row of huts (small warehouses) where the approach to the Heritage Centre is now. There must be a reasonable photo out there somewhere, as it was gone way before my time, but I do remember seeing a photo of these huts. This photo shows the row of huts, but no sign of any platform, it would be behind the red Simpson's tanker. https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/5395139 And this one is just inconclusive. There is someth
  11. Ok, here's a couple more photos of the cattle dock area. The 1st is a general view, whilst the 2nd is a close-up of the end, which shows the base of the loading gauge still in place.
  12. Just to add to the discussion of a "selector". The use of a floating wheel attached either by a wire to, or directly on, the lower end of the signal box lever and two wires from the two signals around this wheel, means that when the lever is pulled, both signals are pulled. But because of the detector attached to the point blades, only one of the signals is free to move. So pulling both wires only actually clears one signal arm, which is automatically the arm appropriate to the route the points are set for. If you are able to make it to Scotland, this arrangement is easily visib
  13. Most remiss of me, not taking my own advice and not keeping up with this thread. The end-dock is definitely still there, even with traces of the loading-gauge post. However there has been material of some sort filled in where the short length of track serving the dock was, and ash from the steam locos is still dumped there. It is certaintly not used for extra parking, well not for public use anyway, although it is used as storage for PW materials. Under where the large heap of ballast is, and the weeds, are the remains of the stanchions for the cattle pens.
  14. What if Edward Watkins' great plan had come to fruition, with a combined GCR-Met-SER and an 1880s channel tunnel...
  15. Bumping up this thread again, no apologies... Clearing out during lockdown, I came across these photos. I took them just as the demolition of the Trent viaduct had begun, must have been about 1983...
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.