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BernardTPM

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BernardTPM last won the day on February 26 2010

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  1. Neither have visible valve gear. The Lima one does have a slidebar though.
  2. Nice selection Dave. The bridge at Tan-y-Bwlch in particular reveals how the girders used to be open (the whole is quite solid now). Does anyone have a date for when it was rebuilt?
  3. Don't forget that these 10ft w.b. Peco wagons date from the early 1970s (the 15ft w.b. ones are slightly older, from the mid/late '60s). In their time they were very good with things like brake shoes in line with the wheels (normal now, not so then) and the close coupled look in a train. Some are more accurate than others and some do seem to mix details a bit, but they represent good value at the price. The standard 17' 6" length is right for a lot of wagon types, but some of the designs are stretched (the 7 plank and steel minerals should be a scale foot shorter) or shrunk (e.g cattle wagon).
  4. There must be a serious flat on that front driving wheel...
  5. They never did the cab ends with that pattern of yellow and black again, save for the all Executive dark grey City of Glasgow (87 006) at the same time.That one had a large white double arrow on the side.
  6. They were briefly quite popular as an import in the late 1950s. Good choice and, no doubt, will be a talking point.
  7. Oooh, Coeur De Lion, the first one. I repainted a friend's Lima 87 into that scheme back then. Even had a go at making a Hi-Speed pan (not too successful in overhead operation).
  8. Five different classes in the first 100 locos and 40 of them were AL5s. No more than 25 of any of the others, some classes just 10.
  9. Playcraft 0-4-0T - clockwork and electric. In 0 the Big Big Train 0-6-0T had a similar look too.
  10. The Great Western did use 6 wheel bogies on some heavier coaches, mainly restaurant/kitchen coaches and some sleepers.
  11. Actually very few six-wheel bogies are suitable for high speeds.
  12. Looks like a Billiard. (Possibly not that exact one as they did lots over the years).
  13. Either way, since they knew at Christmas (from reading that release) they weren't going to be 'available now', they've had time to correct their ads, but have chosen instead to just keep them running even though the models aren't even finished yet, let alone in their way. An own goal.
  14. And not just British ones either. But I don't think anyone really expected cars to last that long in those days. Unless they bought a Reliant Robin
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