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Coryton

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  1. Coryton

    Unifrog?

    That's true, but I've been getting away with it for 10 years or so and I know I'm not the only one. After all, if route isolation was so undesirable, Peco could have changed their points to non isolating a long time ago, I'd have thought. I do not think that's true, at least not in the sense I mean. Looking at the photos earlier in the thread of the underside of the bullhead and N gauge points, the bullhead points don't have any wiring running from the heel to the toe side of the points. The N gauge ones have a wire bypassing the frog as with
  2. Coryton

    Unifrog?

    Thanks. That's very clear. In principle though, it seems to me that by cutting the all the links and appropriately re-connecting, you could route the power across the frog as in an insulfrog and get power switching back. And it's clear that the N gauge ones are not wired in the same way because the photo of the underside shows one wire running across the frog just as in an insulfrog.
  3. Coryton

    Unifrog?

    It's just taking a feed from "red" and another from "blue" isn't it? So that the frog can have whichever one is appropriate to the way the points are set. I think I'm starting to understand. From here it's clear that the bullhead points and N gauge ones are not the same. The N gauge points seem to have a rather odd looking asymmetrical arrangement where power to the inner rails on the diverging side of the frog for one route is taken around the frog as in an insulfrog point, but for the other is taken from another rail on the diverging side of the frog. (I know there ar
  4. Coryton

    Unifrog?

    Thanks. And that's consistent with the Railway Modeller article that said that DC users just need to add extra sections to all their sidings to use these points. However....either the non bullhead ones are different (and thus there is more than one type of unifrog) or the people who say that they can be made power isolating by cutting/making links have somehow got it wrong. Actually this - from Peco themselves - seems to make it quite clear. No power routing no matter what you do. It's certainly not the "best of both worlds" to anyone on DC who is used
  5. Coryton

    Unifrog?

    That's what I thought. But what I can't get a consistent answer on is whether getting power switching to the track beyond the points like an insulfrog point (so that anything on the route that the points are set against is isolated): - Requires just cutting two wires - Requires soldering extra links - Can't be done without an external switch linked to the point position
  6. Coryton

    Unifrog?

    Thanks for responding. My problem is that I have ready so many different things. I realise that they are neither electrofrog nor insulfrog - what I'm trying to find out is how close to either they can be made to act without adding extra switches. Clearly I can do without power switching points by adding lots of extra DC sections. I'd rather not. Yes I have read that. And I have also read (more than once) that all you have to do is cut two links. Hence my confusion. I can understand why Peco have done this. I think they could
  7. Coryton

    Unifrog?

    The last time I looked at this thread I was a bit confused and looking at it again I'm not much the wiser. From looking here and elsewhere on the web, I've come to the following tentative conclusions: 1) Out of the box, unifrog points act as 'insulfrog' points but without power switching (e.g. there is power to both diverting routes) - great for DCC, not necessarily so helpful for DC. 2) Snipping two wires makes them act like an insulfrog point with power switching 3) They can be used as 'electrofrog' points but only by powering the frog via a switch linked to
  8. When they first came out, they actually came with regular Marklin track. I presume it wasn't worthwhile tooling up for special track until they saw how the range sold. But it was a bit odd given how cheap the sets were and how expensive Marklin track is. It did mean that expanding the track beyond what came with the set was rather pricey. If I remember correctly, My World started with a somewhat smaller range than Hornby are starting with. Then again I suppose Marklin have already blazed the trail.
  9. I described above how I believe they work. Possibly my understanding is wrong. But they certainly can. It does seem a bit magical, but I have one* and it definitely works. It consists of what looks like a regular reed switch with a small permanent magnet stuck to it. * Honesty compels me to add that I have more than one but I haven't actually got round to using the others yet.
  10. The ones I've used are not that complicated, though I'm sure that would work. It's "just" a reed switch with a small magnet strapped to it. I believe the way it works is that the magnet isn't strong enough to close the reed switch, but enough to keep it closed. I'm sure the devil is in the details and I'd imagine that getting the right size of magnet in the right place isn't straightforwards. I find it surprising that they aren't more widely available because having a contactless way of turning a circuit on and off, but drawing no current when of
  11. My guess would be that they use latching reed switches - no electronics needed and no power consumption when the lights are off. Unlike a normal reed switch, one wave of a magnet turns them on and they stay on, and another wave turns them off. I have only a somewhat vague idea how they do it but they are very useful. (And fun). Latching reed switches don't seem to be easy to get hold of - in fact the only source i know of is Layouts4U who will sell you them on their own, or as part of the lighting kits they have been selling for a few years and which the new Hornby system bears an
  12. Latest from the Rails of Sheffield advent calendar - Dapol OO 121 in "Midline" livery for ~£80. Pretty good price if you like that sort of thing.
  13. And today N gaugers get their turn at the auto-trailers. If they go as quickly as the 00 ones did, I wouldn't hang around if you want one!
  14. Pretty hefty discount on Bachmann 00 auto-trailers today in the Rails of Sheffield advent calendar. Edited to add: And now all gone.....
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