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ed1234

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Everything posted by ed1234

  1. ed1234

    Little Muddle

    As a photographer, might a camera lens blower (the sort in a rocket shape) be worth a try for agitating dust without blowing too hard? I'm surprised nobody has invented a 'static grass applicator in reverse' that you can hover over scenery to attract fine dust without exerting a suction force like an actual vacuum, though I'm sure there's a good physics reason why that's not possible...
  2. ed1234

    Little Muddle

    Making books for the family is quite easy these days with the various online tools available, and while the results maybe aren't quite Taschen standards, they're pretty good. While living abroad we have made calendars and books each year of our children for my parents and in-laws, which always go down very well and take little more effort than a couple of evenings sorting photos and uploading. It helps all our photos are uploaded to Dropbox in a single folder for that year, so sorting is straightforward. I imagine making a book for publication is a different matter, especially a hard back glossy one. Though I understand Amazon has a self-publication option these days - the explosion in recent years of children's books I had never heard of is often down to talented authors and illustrators pushing something out on Amazon and it becoming curiously popular. My children were obsessed for a time with a series called Little Blue Digger which, it turned out, was an Amazon self-publication. I assume Amazon take a healthy cut.
  3. ed1234

    Little Muddle

    Did gunpowder wagons typically travel in mixed rakes like these? I have an image of them being the 'nuclear flasks' of their day, on dedicated trains (or at least military only), but as smarter Spanish waiters than me have said: I know nothing.
  4. ed1234

    Little Muddle

    I don't know if you did it deliberately, but putting the figure(s) on the footbridge is a really clever trick. It draws the eye away and occupies the subconscious part of my mind that is thinking "I know this is a picture of a model so I must find something that proves it" and redirects it to wistfully imagining what they're looking at (it helps that they seem to be facing away). It's particularly effective at this point on the model where the viewer needs the most 'distraction' because of the scenic break. Clever stuff.
  5. Thanks Phil. Pontrilas version 1.0 is now somewhere in the landfill in the Cayman Islands, due to a series of both fortunate events (admittedly not for the model!) that meant we were able to sell our house and plan our return home to the UK. I have learned many lessons to apply to Pontrilas 2.0 in due course when we settle. In the meantime, here are some pictures of how far I got (not very!), against an image from the Flickr site of Jim Knight. See if you can tell which is the model and which is the real image: I shall leave this thread in existence until such time as the mods decide to delete it, as what would RMWeb be without some long abandoned layouts?
  6. Your scenery belies the scale - if you had told me some of these pictures were 4mm or even 7mm I'd have believed you. I think it comes down to the light - your pictures have a very natural quite harsh wintry light as is often found along the British coastline, which produces very credible shadows in your scenery (particularly the rock faces) which give them a real sense of texture. I assume you have a panel of pure white LEDs overhead?
  7. ed1234

    Little Muddle

    The best thing about that log wagon is that it truly is of its time - you would struggle to source a log the size of the bottom one these days. Modern farmed timber of the sort they move on railways today doesn't generally get to grow to those sorts of diameters before it's harvested. It's like how you can always tell in older West Coast USA houses that were built with old growth forests. Terrible ecological damage was done, of course, indefensible in the modern age of course, but what extraordinarily beautiful wood it yielded.
  8. Starting to take shape as a 'proper' cliff face now, Anthony! At least you know where you are with these big jobs - it's the tiny "I know there's an electrical fault somewhere" jobs that I find dispiriting.
  9. Given the scale of this layout, I feel this advice is like the old joke about painting the Eiffel Tower, in that on Heaton Lodge by the time you've finished one layer, it's been a week since you started and of course it's dry! Great stuff - enjoyed the video very much.
  10. It's ok, I just assumed everything is upside-down in Australia That's a cracking station scene.
  11. The bridge over the line would make for a good small layout / diorama to experiment with achieving grimy, weathered urban surfaces. The ramp provides a bit of visual interest without being too distracting. In the real world, one wonders how filthy those windows got back in the steam era...
  12. In case anyone is wondering, based on Wiki's figure of 399 miles for the WCML, that would still require 1.54 real miles at 1:220 scale.
  13. Here are a couple of versions of (I think) the logo you mean. They are taken from the Annual Reports from the early 1990s (Yorkshire Water was listed in 1989) so aren't great resolution or quality - they are scans from microfiches at Companies House - but with a bit of digital fettling might be ok, given the scale. The version seems a slightly better quality scan, and could be inverted fairly easily. You might have more joy with further research at Companies House. Note the company is now called Kelda Group.
  14. ed1234

    Little Muddle

    Prototype question re the engine shed: what is the little 'roof' above the centre of the doors for? I assume to provide a bit of extra height to allow chimneys etc. to pass through (you see a similar thing on the doors to some aircraft hangars). But why did they not just build the door a little taller?
  15. ed1234

    Little Muddle

    That is a superb angle, and somehow the lack of stock (of the rolling variety, not the bovine...) just gives you an opportunity to take in the peaceful scene and all its little details. There's really very little that gives it away as a model.
  16. ed1234

    Little Muddle

    That factory will make some lovely flats 80 years in Little Muddle's future, when the station area is the car park for a Tesco Extra.
  17. Yes, they're used as you say to turn trains around and (sometimes) to overnight early morning services. They also have a road link so maintenance teams occasionally use them to stable track maintenance equipment. Here's a picture I found on Facebook of all places - I think a Network Rail working on this machine had taken a photo of it. Unfortunately I have lost his details so can't give proper credit.
  18. I don't have a suggestion but just wanted to say thanks to @montyburns56 for starting this thread and to all those that have contributed. These images are fascinating - a mixture of moody, mournful, beautiful, poignant, etc. They also tell a story of a decline that we're still dealing with as a society. Great stuff.
  19. Love the lighting and shadows in those shots Anthony - the strong directional light feels like those moments (of which there are many in Wales, even if they don't last long) where the sun breaks through the clouds in the late afternoon and throws all the terrain into sharp relief. Together with the vegetation it has captured the windswept mountainside effectively. I assume you're using some form of LED-based floodlight?
  20. Fitting the surface I had always envisaged using a thin plywood for the surface, and in the event went for 1/8". In retrospect I should have used 1/4" as it would have required less 'underbracing' between the main spine of the boards. But it did mean I could cut it with a sharp Stanley knife. I made a cardboard mock-up first to get my dimensions, so I could trace onto the thin ply. The handprint on the garage door isn't mine, and indeed pre-dates our ownership of the house. Who knows what the last owners used this room for... ...and here's the ply version: The ply was glued and tacked down with panel pins. Around this same time, we had some builders in to re-do our pool, and the new tiles arrived in several crates surrounded on all sides by 1.5" thick polystyrene, which I saved from the tip (much to the amusement of the builders).
  21. Baseboard assembly I decided to start making the board that contains the station first, and move 'north' up the model. There's no particular reason for this other than it's probably the most interesting board for modelling, and was going to test various of my proposed approaches to the scenic elements. The advantage of building everything in SketchUp is that you can 'flatten' out all the elements to minimise waste of plywood. Where I am located, a sheet of 15mm birch plywood can easily cost £60. The red elements are the first section, yellow are the second, and there's even space for some of the third board (the blue). Taking shape I didn't take any pictures of cutting out the plywood, because I didn't think it was very interesting. I used my circular saw, a fairly new plywood cutting blade and my 'homemade saw track' which is just a piece of plywood and a 90 degree fence. For important joints where minimising tear-out was important, I put masking tape along the cut line. Slowly the pieces took shape (by coincidence the camera angle here is about the same as the 3D model above!).
  22. Thanks all for the thoughts on slips, double slips and suchlike. After a bit more playing in RMPro, I was wondering what you all thought of this arrangement: I have inserted two double slips - the left most one to address the issue discussed further up the chain (trains being able to get onto the GVR from Newport (green line) and off the GVR towards Newport (maroon line), and the one on the right to facilitate trains from Hereford (maroon line) getting into the bay platform / siding, and also permit bay platform trains to head up to Hereford (green line) if necessary. I have also moved the turnout that leads to the GVR (the right-most yellow turnout) 30cm (approx 23 scale metres) to the right, so there is a bit of space between the station turnouts/slips and the GVR 'junction'. In diagrammatic form this now all looks quite neat, and it seems (from comments above) to be closer to how Pontrilas actually was when it was operational. There is space to achieve this outcome solely with turnouts (no double slips) so if wiser heads than mine tell me this would be an unrealistic track plan by 1995, I will rejig some more.
  23. Thanks Phil, you raise a good point. Unfortunately the garage is a place of many hobbies so the railway will need to come apart and go back together every now and then. We also live in a hurricane zone with a reasonably high probability that at some point I will need to ensure it is out of harm's way if the entire garage gets flooded - a much easier task if it breaks down into 150cm units.
  24. Interesting. I have learned a lot about layout planning (and real railways) in the last few posts, so thanks for your thoughts. I can certainly move the mainline crossover back towards the left of the diagram to provide a loco's gap between the yellow pair of points (the branch connection) and the mainline ones. It might mean the mainline crossover is between the station platforms (though right at the end of them), but so be it. Thanks Philip for your thoughts. The chemical works and its associated line has always intrigued me. The only useful online source I have found about what it was up to is this report from a local historical society. I don't really have space to model it, and even in my economically dubious alternative history, small rural chemical works primarily producing naptha would have been long gone by the 1990s (in reality it was gone by the 1930s!). If this were a 2020s model then maybe The Golden Valley Ciderworks (also on the site) would have become a trendy artisan cider manufacturer with an eco-friendly railway siding. On the 1920s plan the line is still present. Its angle, plus the need to get up the embankment, must mean it joined the mainline a good distance away from Pontrilas station. One day if I get to visit Pontrilas in real life, I'd like to see if there's any remaining hint of the sloped embankment.
  25. I have tweaked the track plan a little to move the cross-over towards the station a little and now provide a route for diverted trains to come off the GVR, cross the Hereford mainline and continue to Newport (or come up from Newport and get diverted onto the GVR. Let's hope I have enough turnouts! (The curves on the below aren't millimetre perfect.)
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