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5&9Models

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    http://www.5and9models.co.uk

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  • Location
    Shropshire
  • Interests
    4mm scale scratchbuilding and kit manufacture for 19th century railways, mainly LB&SCR, SER, LCDR and London railways.

    Currently building an exhibition layout of Bricklayers Arms C.1844 in EM gauge.

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  1. Thanks. The C&WR was more a branch of the SER. I found a simple line drawing in the Vulcan Foundry archive, then by coincidence an article on these engines appeared in the recent Invicta (Journal of the South Eastern & Chatham Society which prompted me to get on with it.
  2. Thanks. The C&WR was more a branch of the SER. I found a simple line drawing in the Vulcan Foundry archive, then by coincidence an article on these engines appeared in the recent Invicta (Journal of the South Eastern & Chatham Society which prompted me to get on with it.
  3. Thanks, I'm working on it but it's a long way off yet; Bricklayers Arms c1844-45.
  4. It's been a very long time since my last post (which I think was a 4mm scale chair!) but I've nearly completed my latest build: Canterbury & Whitstable Railway, Taylor 0-6-0 goods loco, no.121, c1847. The bulk of it was constructed whilst convalescing with a broken left metatarsal. What a tragedy to be signed off work and have to sit there day after day with my foot up, drinking tea and model making, life can be so cruel! A friend offered some Portescap motor/gearboxes in exchange for kits so one of these formed the basis for this engine. The gearbox had to be dismantled and reversed so the driving axle sat under the motor and the wheels were some old Romford ones from the scrap box. One of the biggest challenges was the haycock firebox with it's brass beading around the corners. The box itself was build up from two strips of scribed 10thou brass bent into an 'n', cut and soldered together, then the brass corners cut from 5thou, bent and beaten into submission around the curves, a horrible job and much learned in the process but it doesn't look too bad. It hasn't put me off doing another one anyway. The tender was rest was gradually scratch built using good old fashioned measure, bend and cut techniques, as was the rest of the loco, a refreshingly 3D print free zone! It still requires some water feed pipes under the footplate and there is an annoying little short every time it goes left which I must sort out. Of course some crew will be required before it moves 'off shed' but they can wait. The photographs leave a bit to be desired, I find the low sun at this time of year a bit tricky, our house faces due south and not casting a shadow over the photo at midday requires some degree of contortion. Hopefully they will do for now, next up is an 1845 Bodmer Single but as usual it will take me ages! Thanks for looking and please feel free to ask if you need to know more.
  5. But..(there’s always a but), they eventually offered him the post of General Manager and he turned it down to do teacher training! Thus I had a dad who could have brought me home a new train set every week but instead ended up being headmaster of my primary school! Life can be cruel like that...!
  6. In the ‘50s my dad worked for Lines Bros. in Margate making Triang railway models. He was in charge of purchasing the raw materials and he always said black was the hardest colour to manufacture. The injection moulded plastic had to be the right shade of black, any greenish, blueish or reddish hues would be rejected, and it was quite a common problem.
  7. If you think this is complicated you should see the endless knots folks tie themselves in over Stroudley’s Improved Engine Green. My advice is to model the 1840s ... then nobody’s got a clue what the right shade might be. Saves a load of bother!
  8. Also there are 18 different species of holly.....!
  9. I appreciate that an awful long time has passed since this post but I’ve just stumbled across it and have been admiring the horse box. Please could you tell me which edition of ILN the drawing is in, I’d like to look it up? Also, John gave me his masters earlier in the year for all the castings required to complete his resin brake vans (although which ones go with which van is unclear). I can now supply castings to suit. Cheers Chris
  10. What about Mike Sharman’s Oakwood Press book, packed full of BG loco drawings? ISBN 0 85361 314 1
  11. I’m sitting at home with a cup of coffee with nursing an injured foot feeling sorry for myself. Looking at these fantastic photos has really cheered me up. I am now fully inspired, thank you!
  12. What a great idea, I think that’s very effective.
  13. The first engine for the Holyhead Breakwater was built by Adams & Co., see attached from ‘Road Progress’ published in 1850. I wonder if this engine was used as the pattern for Longridge & Co. as the photos of Prince Albert fit W.B. Adams description very well. Chris
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