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5&9Models

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    http://www.5and9models.co.uk

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  • Location
    Shropshire
  • Interests
    4mm scale scratchbuilding and kit manufacture for 19th century railways, mainly LB&SCR, SER, LCDR and London railways.

    Currently building an exhibition layout of Bricklayers Arms C.1844 in EM gauge.

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  1. This evening’s test was to see if Little England would actually pull six cast white metal 1st class carriages on a level road, and... “Oh ye of little faith”... it did! But, (and there’s always a ‘but’), it would only do it bunker first and the gears make quite a racket! I also need to adjust the spring loading on the front axle as the wheels slide a bit. Perhaps a weighted collar around the axle would help. For the sake of BBC style balance, I also tried my 0-4-2 on the same rake and it strolled quietly away with them like they weren’t there! I love that engine..!
  2. In Mr England’s obsession with lowering the centre of gravity he seems to have forgotten that the buffers really do work better with the support of the frame behind them. As you say, one heavy shunt and they would buckle.
  3. To be honest I’ve yet to see if it will work the ordinary stock of a model railway!
  4. Over the few years I've been a member of RMWeb, I seem to have erroneously created several blogs. My clumsy grasp of computers has been a bit frustrating as I never know where I've posted and have a horrible habit of posting new material on the wrong blog and so on. Therefore a little bit of belated Spring Cleaning is required and I have copied the info from my previous 'George England 2-2-2' blog to this one so that I can have it all in the right place. So, apologies to those who have read the first bit before and I hope that the new material is sufficiently interesting to make up for it! The Railway Chronicle for December 16th 1848, carries an article on 'a specimen of a light locomotive, called the 'Little England', which, with its tender on the same frame, will work the ordinary stock of a company. The 'Little England' and tender weigh together when roadworthy 9 tons 5 cwt. It has a 7-in. cylinder, a 12-in. stroke, and 4 ft. 6 in. driving wheels. The diameter of the leading trailing wheels is 3ft. The distance between the extreme centres is 14ft.' The article goes on to describe the journey from New Cross to Brighton station with three first-class carriages containing 31 persons of note. Its sprightly performance was much praised and George England went on to produce several versions at his Hatcham Iron Works just off the Old Kent Road. In the Summer of 1849, George made his first sale of his little 2-2-2 engine to the Dundee, Perth & Aberdeen Railway. Before the year was out, a further example (named Dwarf) went to the London & Blackwall, and the following year six more were sent to a variety of destinations. Of these, three (named England, Samson and Hercules) went to the L&B, one (also named England) travelled north to the Edinburgh & Glasgow and another to the Liverpool, Crosby & Southport Rly. A further locomotive (named Little England) was prepared for the Great Exhibition, becoming exhibit no.509 and receiving a Gold Medal for it's efforts. A charming contemporary illustration apparently shows 'Little England' and is probably the Great Exhibition engine with a wheelbase of 15ft. Clark also illustrated one of George's engines with a 12ft. 6in. wheelbase, so there were different versions along the same theme sometimes with the same name. Finally, a photograph of 'Dwarf' on the Sandy & Potton confirms the 15ft wheelbase version. The aforementioned etches provide a good basis for what is essentially a scratch build. Motorising such a tiny loco is always a challenge and I chose to hide an H&S mini motor in the bunker and drop the gears down under the footplate, up into the firebox, to a 40:1 worm and pinion on the driving axle. The gears themselves were robbed from an old toy engine from my childrens wooden train set, (don't worry, the motor was burned out beyond redemption - I'm not that mean)! It all seems to run very sweetly and does the job at a total of 90:1. I'm going with the 15ft wheelbase for my model although I'd like it to be 14ft to represent the original 'Little England' I can't face 'cutting and shutting' the etches and it's not obvious where to loose the 4mm without making it look very odd indeed. I suspect I would need to steel 2mm from behind the drivers somewhere and 2mm in front which is just too much hassle! I appreciate this little locomotive has graced the pages of RMweb before thanks to the excellent contribution by chris p bacon, however, thanks to the aforementioned gent sending me a set of etches to aid the scratch building of my own attempt, I thought I'd share the progress here. The Railway Chronicle for December 16th 1848, carries an article on 'a specimen of a light locomotive, called the 'Little England', which, with its tender on the same frame, will work the ordinary stock of a company. The 'Little England' and tender weigh together when roadworthy 9 tons 5 cwt. It has a 7-in. cylinder, a 12-in. stroke, and 4 ft. 6 in. driving wheels. The diameter of the leading trailing wheels is 3ft. The distance between the extreme centres is 14ft.' The article goes on to describe the journey from New Cross to Brighton station with three first-class carriages containing 31 persons of note. Its sprightly performance was much praised and George England went on to produce several versions at his Hatcham Iron Works just off the Old Kent Road. In the Summer of 1849, George made his first sale of his little 2-2-2 engine to the Dundee, Perth & Aberdeen Railway. Before the year was out, a further example (named Dwarf) went to the London & Blackwall, and the following year six more were sent to a variety of destinations. Of these, three (named England, Samson and Hercules) went to the L&B, one (also named England) travelled north to the Edinburgh & Glasgow and another to the L.C&S.Rly. (although what that stands for I'm not sure - help me out someone)! A further locomotive (named Little England) was prepared for the Great Exhibiton, becoming exhibit no.509. A charming contemporary illustration apparently shows 'Little England' and is probably the Great Exhibition engine with a wheelbase of 15ft. Clark also illustrated one of George's engines with a 12ft. 6in. wheelbase, so there were different versions along the same theme sometimes with the same name. Finally, a photograph of 'Dwarf' on the Sandy & Potton confirms the 15ft wheelbase version. The aforementioned etches provided a good basis for what was essentially a scratch build. Motorising such a tiny loco is always a challenge and I chose to hide an H&S mini motor in the bunker and drop the gears down under the footplate, up into the firebox, to a 40:1 worm and pinion on the driving axle. The gears themselves were robbed from an old toy engine from my childrens wooden train set, (don't worry, the motor was burned out beyond redemption - I'm not that mean)! It all seems to run very sweetly and does the job at a total of 90:1. I'm going with the 15ft wheelbase for my model although I'd like it to be 14ft to represent the original 'Little England' I can't face 'cutting and shutting' the etches and it's not obvious where to loose the 4mm without making it look very odd indeed. I suspect I would need to steel 2mm from behind the drivers somewhere and 2mm in front which is just too much hassle! Having cobbled together a working gearbox the rest of the loco could be built up. It's a combination of etches and bits of brass and nickel silver. The copper firebox top, dome, chimney and other round parts were turned up on the lathe, an essential tool when modelling engines of this period as one can certainly never expect to find the correct size and shape from proprietary sources. The final chassis has wiper pick-ups to the leading and driving wheels, but the trailing wheels had to be cast from resin. An issue I hadn't foreseen was that the usual steel-tyred wheels ran so close to the sides of the motor that all they wanted to do was stick to it. The only solution was to make them from plastic and the resulting wheels work just fine... thankfully! Facing right. Facing Left, and not quite on the rails...!
  5. Excellent model making and a very interesting wagon.
  6. Well, if your local church ever ask for it back, at least you have a plan B !
  7. I would try using tungsten putty instead of lead. It sticks where you put it and remains pliable so if you ever have to pick it out it’s a simple job.
  8. I had a chance (or was it that I finally got around to it?) to finish these three, two for the GNR and one little wagon with no owner (hashtag sad face). The first two are the Horsebox and Open Carriage Truck designed by Archibald Sturrock and built by Joseph Wright for the Great Northern Railway. Horses were conveyed in this box three abreast with their heads in the overhanging section above one of the dog-boxes. Hinged removable partitions separated the horses, and left the animals a width space of not much more than 2ft, quite a squeeze. The livestock conveyed in the dog-boxes themselves require no further explanation, although in the absence of suitable canines, they may have been used to carry extra feed or even tack. Almost identical horseboxes were made in 1855 for the New South Wales Railway. Fortunately a very clear photograph of one of these exists, providing a good general impression of the appearance. These boxes had two extra vertical ribs on the outside framing at one end. The vents in the side doors were also more generous but perhaps that is a reflection of the warmer climate for which they were destined. A simple wooden brake and lever is also evident on the NSW version but such a fitting was almost certainly not on the vehicles supplied to British lines. These would have had no brakes at all, requiring a scotch block or bar when stationary. Horseboxes of this pattern were built for other lines but evidence is sketchy. Photographs suggest that the first horseboxes for the LCDR were to this design and possibly the SER as well, although that might just be my own wishful thinking! The jury is out on colour, some say varnished teak, others say painted brown, I've gone for brown. The same applies for the OCT, a good photo of the NSW version also exists. The little wagon below is something of a mystery, it was built by Smith & Willey of Liverpool but it is not known if this was for a specific customer or if this was simply a 'stock' design for anyone who required such a sturdy little general purpose wagon. Early details of this company are sketchy, however Smith & Willey were operating from their Edge Hill & Windsor Foundry at Smithdown Lane, Liverpool from the mid 1830s. It was gutted by fire around Christmas 1845 but restored, and by 1847 the arrival of the iron merchant John Finch brought much needed capital. Further works were established at Seville Place in Dublin as The Irish Engineering Company. In 1849 the retirement of Henry Smith caused the partnership to be dissolved and henceforth it was known as Finch & Willey. The firm continued to enjoy some success supplying a wide variety of ironwork and machinery, railway trucks, wagons and carriages but by 1851 the company was in such financial difficulty that a stock sale was held and the business much reduced. However, the company were able to claim some fame in the construction of a bridge designed by I. K. Brunel to carry the South Wales Railway over the river Wye at Chepstow, a model of which was exhibited at the Great Exhibiton of 1851. The Seville Works also supplied the London, Brighton & South Coast Railway in excess of 800 tons of ironwork for the extension of their station at London Bridge. Final closure and sale of the remaining plant and premises in Liverpool came in 1853, but the Irish side of the business continued. By 1860 the works had turned their hand to the manufacture of bedsteads and an advertisement of 1863 once again promotes wagons and rolling stock to be built both in Dublin and at Goswell St., London. Who knows what colour they might have been, I was in a SER mood so it ended up red.
  9. Extraordinary work! Nothing like making life difficult for yourself, I admire your tenacity. Hope you get it sorted, I’m really looking forward to seeing what will be a fabulous piece of model making.
  10. David Austin of the South Eastern & Chatham Society and of the HMRS has a lovely big model of Folkstone Harbour in 7mm.
  11. Fabulous work as always, (and a very tidy and organised blog too)! Thank you!
  12. Good point, I hadn’t thought of that. However Thomas Buckingham and two of his Porters were soon dismissed for ‘being inefficient’ and Buckingham was replaced by a Head Porter from London Bridge.
  13. In 1844, the Head Porter at Bricklayers Arms, Thomas Buckingham, had sixteen men under his control so I suppose many hands make light work.
  14. I think in terms of weathering it’s fine, although perhaps a darker wash around some of the lower sections to darken the mortar would look good but only in small amounts. For me, the biggest improvement would be to add a bit of variety in the brick shade. It’s all very uniform at the moment and I think picking out some individual bricks in a couple of darker, and perhaps one lighter shade would make a big difference. It takes a while and it’s a bit fiddly, but it adds a realistic variation in brick tone. It’s only modern bricks that are a uniform shade. In the past when bricks were made from coarser clay and fired in clamps they came out all sorts of shades and colours. Hope this helps. Chris
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