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Hobby

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Everything posted by Hobby

  1. Try sitting in a wheelchair one row back and trying to read a light on the other side of the road. The waist level ones are easier to use for wheelchair/mobility scooter users. The countdown ones are common in Germany, certainly in the big cities. Only trouble is they encourage last minute rushes or people with limited mobility starting to rush when when they are part way across which they shouldn't have to. Re the differences and why some don't have a flashing green man see this link. Also I suspect that if you tried the defence of "I don't have to obey pedestrian lights" as a defence they'd chuck the case out, the HC is clear enough, don't cross on red, cross on green and don't start to cross on flashing green. Couldn't be clearer... https://www.saga.co.uk/magazine/motoring/cars/enjoying/the-rights-you-didnt-know-pedestrians-have
  2. At the moment the problem seems not driven by the Law as such but by interpretations of the Law which I don't think the Law makers themselves envisaged when they wrote the laws. In particular the current trend to "no win, no fee" claims where they are exploiting every chink in the law to make claims (that lady's claim where tis discussion started is a prime example). I am sure that Common Law is developed over time and "common sense" is applied, actions that are seen as reasonable for instance. The blame/claim culture we are now seeing seems to be riding roughshod over everything these days. (I hope that makes some sense!)
  3. I suppose this is the ultimate thread drift, rail onto water! I think people are being very unfair about novice boat handlers. We had a cabin cruiser on the canals back in the 60s and 70s (I still have our Silver Sword for a trip from Scarisbrick down to London and back via Sharpness, Oxford, Birmingham and many "remainder" canals!) when there were very few hire boats but plenty of privately owned cruisers and narrowboats. The antics of some of the owner-boats sometimes had to seen to be believed. I can remember getting into the odd scrape myself, though a powerful inboard/outboard usually got me out of them! I would expect novices to get into problems from time to time, same as "Sunday" drivers often do, but let's be honest about this, many boat owners (who should, in theory, know better) are just as bad.
  4. And that's only one of the bus stops on that stretch.... Having said that it has a 50 limit there.
  5. You can't cover every eventuality, that's for certain, at some point you have to say "enough's enough" and that people have to take responsibility for their own actions, I'd say that in cases surrounding (mis)use of railway land we've already reached that level. Trouble is with the "blame" culture we have that won't happen any time soon... Going back to the HV vests, for a class of young schoolkids it's quite a good idea, at least they are not only visible but can be easily seen by the teachers if they try to do a runner!
  6. I was one of those who posted who you regard as "lucky", I'm sorry but I'd dispute that, we were made aware of the dangers and as we had no distractions like mobiles/headphones, etc., we were more aware of our surroundings and their dangers, that's not being lucky, it's having common sense and treating our surroundings with some respect... So what were these distractions we had back then you mentioned, Please tell me...
  7. It's an interesting point, what has changed? I, too, was brought up in that era. Our local playground was Longton Brickworks (shut for several years when we played there. It had three (very) deep lakes where the clay had been dug out) but I only ever remember one fatality there, due to drowning (the weeds got him), and the only reaction was for all the parents to remind us to "be careful"... It still had it's buildings and chimney and for several years we kids gradually removed the bricks from the bottom (as per Fred D., though we didn't know that's how he did it at the time!), eventually an adult spotted what was going on and they demolished it before we did! No that could have been nasty! We also used to wander across the mainline near Lostock Hall same as PS says above, and even though there were a lot of us there were no injuries or fatalities... I can even remember that we allocated a "look out" who kept their eye out for trains (4 track main line, two fast, two slow lines). The train crew who did the shunting in the sidings used to chat to us... So what's changed since then? Some of it seems to be a lack of awareness of their surroundings and dangers by people these days. Trains have always been dangerous but back "in the day" were were brought up with a healthy respect for things mechanical and the dangers that go with them, I am not sure that's the case these days. We'd never dream of walking down a road with earphones on and not taking any notice of our surroundings to give just one example... We saw the advert on TV saying "wear something white at night" and took notice... If were were told that the lakes were deep and dangerous we'd treat them with respect, at least most of us did... So, what has changed, why do people seem to do such stupid things where even an ounce of brains would be shouting "Don't!", such as those two poor girls or the person who dropped their phone on the track at Chesterfield and got down without looking... And, more worryingly, why are other people trying to blame their stupidity on someone else?
  8. You wonder how we all survived in the old days before all these signs were put up...
  9. Why should it be... The Trust says: Ms Caulfield said: "It's a difficult balance... if you put too much fencing or signage you destroy the beauty of the place." and "We advise visitors to act sensibly." Seems Darwinism is stronger than Common Sense these days...
  10. Surely some common sense should come into the equation. For a fatality I can understand a delay, but even then it's not more than a couple of hours or so (most of the time)... But for a stolen/dumped vehicle it should be cleared much quicker... The world's gone mad if we are causing line closures for this sort of thing. Use gloves and close the door and drag the thing out of the way, do the dusting for prints when it's safely out of the way and the line is open...
  11. Except when modelling in most common British model railway scales! Back on subject, how did it take several hours to shift it? Just get a long rope and a large truck and drag the thing off...
  12. No reason why they would, they are still part of the UK so comply with our regulations, not that of a foreign country.
  13. https://c8.alamy.com/comp/KY14Y0/storm-aftermath-fallen-tree-blocking-country-side-road-KY14Y0.jpg Though I prefer this one, though it's more conventional: http://6000.co.za/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/trencher2_smd.jpg
  14. Or 22.15m not so unwieldy. Or 24yds 0ft 10 1/2ins (approx)... Give me decimals over fractions any day
  15. I had the 1.6 in Czech Republic, yes they are "OK" but I prefer the Fabia if I had a choice. I'm on my third 7 speed DSG 'box, I wouldn't go back to manual now if I had the choice, brilliant gearbox...
  16. Yes, though a small Skoda will do as long as it's not a Yeti! That's why metric has centimetres, metres and kilometres so you don't do everything in millimetres! To be fair metric is a lot more logical than impreial as well. I seem to have started something with that off the cuff suggestion to change sides for driving... Please note it was said very "tongue in cheek" as a joke, there is no way we'll see anything of the kind in the UK until we all travel around in self -driving vehicles and the human side is removed altogether, it would cost far too many lives if we tried it now!
  17. What on earth did you book to end up with one of those monstrosities, Mike? I was annoyed enough a couple of years ago when they changed the Fabia i ordered to a Yeti but if it's been a Hummer I'd have refused it. I've got a BMW 1 series ordered next month in Germany so it will be interesting what i get, I'm betting on a Golf!
  18. We may as well do the switch from left to right at the same time... Been there, done that, but the other way round! You just have to keep reminding yourself...
  19. My reading is that he went past the second sign at walking pace with no intention of stopping at it so he could get up to the gates where he would then stop (to save a few minutes of time?). It reads as though he had no intention of stopping at that sign even though it told him that for the type of train he was driving he had to top unless the gates were already open for rail traffic. "The driver stopped at the first stop board and then proceeded at walking pace, past the second stop board, with the intention of stopping close to the crossing gates." We'll have to agree to differ on this one, Mike, even the RAIB thought the sign was OK.
  20. Depends how they are done, if there is a particular issue they can concentrate on that in addition to the normal on-going stuff to serve as a reminder. However it looks like this goes beyond that, it would seem that there was deliberate ignoring of the rules (signs, local instructions, call them what you will), unfortunately that sort of thing only tends to come to light when someone in authority sees it or an accident happens such as this. I would hope that the Driver Trainer and/or Assessors were not complicent with the "custom and practice", if they were it's going to take some work to get it out of the system. The "C&P" attitude seen here seems more reminiscent of "playing with trains" we used to see at the start of the preservation movement than what it should be now. I'd be more worried about that sort of attitude than the (red herring) sign.
  21. Hence we have Assessments and Safety Briefs, and I assume the FR do as well, so that they can be reminded. (Many road vehicle drivers could also benefit from such events! )
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