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RANGERS

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  • Location
    The Welland Valley, well almost!
  • Interests
    BR blue period years, mostly interested in ER, ex GNR/ GCR/ GER lines but with some Scottish Pre-group, ironstone and industrial railways and Irish narrow gauge thrown in for good measure. And then there's cars, lorries, buses etc...

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  1. Good to see Waverley in happier times. The need for major boiler works has placed the future as an operational ship in doubt, https://www.waverleyexcursions.co.uk/ We were looking forward to taking a trip this Summer on the East Coast leg of the tour but the feeling is that it’ll be 2021 or 22 at the earliest before she’ll resume sailing, if indeed at all.
  2. Good to hear that commercial players in the industry will be making a contribution towards maintaining what is a wonderful institution.
  3. Don’t use the Piccadilly option if you’re strapped for time. As well as a longer scheduled journey, you’re in the lap of the gods as reliability over the summer has been shocking. Id allow an hour minimum travelling plus your judgement to cover delays/ airport checks etc.
  4. I had my first ride on one on Friday and left it distinctly underwhelmed. The ride was little better, maybe no better, perhaps even worse than the Mk4 sets. There was a swaying overe crossings which was unnerving and I can vouch for what’s been written elsewhere about the seats, they are worse than most buses and a long way fro the kind of thing that’s likely to entice people out of their cars.
  5. Dinky did the Muir-Hill loader which I believe was 1:43 scale
  6. A pal of mine uses magnetic couplings within rakes in O gauge. They’re on flexible rubber mounts which are set at the length of the gangway connections with the buffers retracted, allows them to go round corners whilst maintaining a constant distance on straights.
  7. Those regulations are already mandatory for coaches of this age which are used on services that fall within scope of PSVAR. The changes which take effect on Jan 1st 2020 only impact on coaches registered prior to Jan 1st 2005. Lovely model, captures the clean and square lines of theTourismo beautifully.
  8. Interesting they’ve chosen an LNWR colour for what are predominantly Midland services.
  9. I think that was the company that produced the Builder Plus kits in the 70s and 80s, some of the first railway kits I built.
  10. RANGERS

    Roy Jackson

    So sad to hear this yesterday. Roy was something of an icon to us mere mortals of the model world which was something I doubt he ever accepted or even recognised the concept of. Whilst his skills and achievements more than justified celebrity status, in my limited experience of him, it’s something he would have found totally alien. The standards he set were high, extremely high and I don’t think he ever understood why people thought that they were anything other than ordinary. Modest to the core, his simple view to me at Expo EM a few years ago was that if an “experienced bodger” like him could manage it, it couldn’t be difficult. The reality of it, as everyone else recognised, was that his work was at the very top of the tree, pushed the boundaries and illustrated the true craftsman that he was. Whilst we’ve lost a real giant of our hobby, and a genuinely nice guy, the vast legacy he left will enrich us for years to come. Sleep soundly Roy.
  11. They are, most of the way from Corby South to Storefield. The masts are almost complete between Corby and Kettering and the remaining gaps are gradually closing all the way South to Bedford now.
  12. The AC stock was used on the Skeggy's regularly for the first time in 1983. When HSTs were introduced on the Midland, the Mk2s cascaded replaced the remaining mk1s which as the MML requirement was less at the weekend, had traditionally been used on the Saturday extras. The Mk1s displaced from the MML moved on to the Summer dated trains and the oldest (and most decrepit, they really were!) vacuum only mk1s were withdrawn. The locos followed the same pattern, fewer 45/1s and 47/4s required for the MML at the weekend freed these up for Skeggy runs. I don't have any record of a 45 at Skegness before 1982 but they were commonplace from 1983 onwards.
  13. These ran from Welbeck Colliery in Derbyshire via Toton and Brent but I don't know when the North Kent works were equipped for MGR working, I believe they'd previously ran with vacuum braked wagons and I wouldn't be certain that MGRs ran before the 1970s. They ran twice daily in the late 70s and early 80s and were rostered for Toton type 4 haulage which could be anything from home, Holbeck or Tinsley based 45/0, 45/1 or any variant of 47 from just about any depot. Pairs of 25s were a pretty rare but acceptable substitute, legend has it type 1s were used on occasions after they'd been fitted with guard's brake valves in the early 80s but I've never seen a photo and as Cricklewood crews weren't trained on them, it seems unlikely they'd have progressed beyond Wellingborough. A look at an Ian Allan Locoshed book for your chosen period should give plenty of options. The roster had an exchange of north and southbound trains between LMR and SR motive power and crews at Brent but this didn't always happen and a pal of mine who was at Cricklewood 1978-1983 took the train onward with a pilot from Clapham several times.
  14. Are we really suggesting that a TfL approach would solve all ills outside London? TfL loses circa £2m a day, most of it on the buses. Elsewhere, across the rest of the country as a whole, total bus subsidies are a fraction of what the TfL network needs to prop it up. By all means re-regulate buses, and then cut around £10-12bn from other services to provide a bus network comparable to that which London currently enjoys, but undoubtedly not for much longer. London does work, but at a price, a price which there is now a slowly dawning realisation is one which the Capital, and more critically the country simply can’t afford.
  15. Are we really suggesting that a TfL approach would solve all ills outside London? TfL loses circa £2m a day, most of it on the buses. Elsewhere, across the rest of the country as a whole, total bus subsidies are a fraction of what the TfL network needs to prop it up. By all means re-regulate buses, and then cut around £10-12bn from other services to provide a bus network comparable to that which London currently enjoys, but undoubtedly not for much longer. London does work, but at a price, a price which there is now a slowly dawning realisation is one which the Capital, and more critically the country simply can’t afford.
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