Jump to content

sem34090

Members
  • Content Count

    4,131
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

sem34090 last won the day on January 12 2018

sem34090 had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

5,456 Excellent

6 Followers

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://sem34090.simplesite.com/441152081

Profile Information

  • Location
    Watching the trains pass a Socially Distanced Medstead and Four Marks. Also planning yet another layout.
  • Interests
    Railways, Railways... Erm... History, Decent* Music, Decent* fashion, Railways, Military Railways, Umm... Railways, Railway History, Railways, Military Railway History, Railways, Oh... erm... Analogue Photography, Railways...

    *Read: "Pre-1960s"

Recent Profile Visitors

2,218 profile views
  1. Someone was bound to ask - Is there any chance of this being made available to purchase? It looks wonderful!
  2. The six wheelers even more so than the four wheelers!!!
  3. And I must say that they're beautiful models. A friend of ours has one and we have another in bits downstairs.
  4. Need some nice period wallpaper really, but that might be a tad extreme for one photo!
  5. Ah, well, y'see... Those coaches look much too modern for the period. Really like the concept though. Might try that one myself at some point.
  6. I'll just leave this here... Dangerously close to topic, and not at all relevant to the above discussion, it may be found on the rear of the August 1912 edition of The Railway Magazine.
  7. Many years ago I downloaded a 444, 450 and 158 into SketchUp, replaced the multicoloured swooshes with green then did the rest of the train in salmon and brown.
  8. I remember I once had a really nice (payware) version of the WSR (for TRS2006) in then-current form that I thought was the best thing under the sun. Hours of fun with that. Can't remember who made it though. I doubt it's available now but if it is then it might be worth a look for better representations of the stations? I remember it came with two Manors, a 6400 Pannier, two BR Class 35s and a BR Class 117. Also included were some quite nice MK1s and a variety of wagons all modelled relatively closely on the WSR's fleet at the time. I remember being impressed how they'd modelled the cottage at Watchet that we'd stayed in that summer.
  9. I think, though, that as @45655 (him again...) have discussed there are enough common elements between signs that a generic 'Southern Railway Font' can be developed for use by modellers. Particularly on larger signs and in larger scales it is increasingly noticeable, for me, that certainly this would be better than trying to use a proprietary font such as the famous Gill Sans or even a derivative of Johnston.
  10. The blue car stop numbers were, I thought, an LSWR hang-over? Blue signs on the South Eastern therefore sounds rather odd.
  11. I suppose I could always knock some up for you - wouldn't take a few minutes. The sign at Alton is a preservation-era addition and is, I believe, based on a sign that was at Wokingham with the places swapped to match Alton. The pre-war shade, and possibly the shade used for signs throughout, has got a BS number and name, but I'm afraid I can't remember it; Ask @45655!!! (That's going to be my stock answer from now on for all things Southern, probably...)
  12. Here's my attempt at putting a basic version of the font together from photos of real signs found online. Note that the 'SOUTHERN ELECTRIC' legend at the top of the sign on the right isn't my creation; it's a font that was made by Iain Logan and is available to download here; http://www.zoo.co.uk/iainlogan/commercial/index.html. The Target shape and arrow are part of the font - the target replaces '9' , a left-pointing arrow is '(' + ')' + '+' and a right-pointing one is '=' + '?' + '@'. What I've 'created' (hardly) is a fairly bold version, some signs use a lighter weight version - Compare this to the photo above, for example; But I think it captures a general sense of the font. It needs a lot of refinement really, but with a bit of playing in MS Publisher or a similar piece of software one ought to be able to produce something that is at least usable on a model railway. I'm now working on making it able to be downloaded by people here. I may put some time into reworking it with a bit of guidance from @45655 when he next has the (dis)pleasure of my company. Speaking of which, I have a period telephone directory to replicate... A font like this will never, never, be perfect as there is quite simply an almost endless number of variations from one sign to the next. Slightly differing weights, slightly differing character shapes; I've included two 'A's and two versions of '1', '3' and '4' alone! Some of the characters are very messy; I was working from photos found online after all and to do this properly would require someone with some actual graphic design skills (i.e. not me!). @45655 (Again) has already pointed out the issues with the 'L', 'N' and the spacing around the standard 'A' so i will probably resolve these at some point. Hopefully, once I've managed to upload a link to download it, someone finds this useful though!
  13. I'm currently trying to get as many characters as I can together. So far I think I'm only missing 'Z', '?', '!', '-' and a few numbers. Obviously lower case is a non-entity here so I'll use that for some variations.
  14. Making an alphabet could work... Thanks for the idea Kevin! Now, where to find those letters and characters not normally used on signs...
  15. Bloomin' typical! I do a Google search for this, then click on this thread hoping it'd be useful only to be met with this! So... Does anybody know what font the Southern used for station signage and for loco numbering and lettering in the 1930s? Actually, I know that the answer is "on locos it was sign-written, on signs it came out of some sign-writer's pattern book" but I'm trying to find the closest thing I can. I've already been told that the station signs did not use Gill Sans and looking at a few examples there do seem to be differences.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.