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Flymo749

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  1. Hi Khris, Usually it's Alan Gibson wheels. That said, I've just used my first set of Ultrascales, and I think I'll be placing some orders to allow for the lead time of manufacture on the queue of unmade kits. That said, the real question is probably about how you short them out to conduct the current from the tyre to the axle. My preference is for the etched brass shorting strip. Have a look at Brassmasters, although similar are available from the EMGS, and there used to be some in the Bill Bedford range. They all basically do the same thing. I use a squ
  2. Morning! As I'm now a complete convert to the benefits of split chassis, this topic caught my eye. As others have said, Branchlines make an excellent jig for producing axles from their components. I use both the two- and three-part axles, using the three-part to keep the gearbox in a neutral section. I wrote a couple of posts on this a few months ago on the Scalefour Society Forum. You can see some being made here: Making Branchlines split axles I also adopt a belt and braces approach to making sure that the gearbox stays neutral by insulatin
  3. There is also a good article to look at by my good friend and occasional poster here, Mark Tatlow. It's is Scalefour News 195, and is entitled "Trackwork problem-finding checklist". It's basically a series of things that you can do to "debug" trackwork after it's been built - I know that mine certainly needs it! It makes mention of the Mint gauge, and quite a few other tips besides. If you don't have a hard copy, it's downloadable from the Members' Area. I keep digital copies of all the Scalefour News now, as well as the hard copies. Much easier to search when you n
  4. Bear in mind that the Mint gauge is used for checking track, not for building it. I just wanted to make that clear at the outset for you. The idea is that you slide it along, and it will reveal any tight spots or snags. It's excellent for fine-tuning track after it's built. There are plenty of discussions of its use on the Scalefour Society Forum. Cheers Paul
  5. Thanks Jeremy - much appreciated. Aiming to model nothing more recent than 1911, I've always a been a bit lost with this sparkifying stuff. Cheers Paul
  6. There are more than four of the Conductor Rail Supports in a pack. The picture is just to illustrate the completed items. I'll find out for you exactly what length of track one of the £4.50 packs covers. The broader range of 3rd/4th rail parts available from the Society are: 145A Conductor rail, S.R. & LUR, nickel-silver (includes £2.75 postal supplement) £12.75 10 mtr 145B Conductor rail, S.R. & LUR, nickel-silver (includes £2.75 postal supplement) £22.75 20 mtr 145C Conductor rail, S.R. & LUR, nickel-silv
  7. An Iain Rice build of "Bromley's Be-riveted Drudge" (as he termed the M12) is the star piece in issue 0 of the MRJ... It had me hooked at that! "A new quarterly journal for the finescale model railway enthusiast" was how it was termed, and we all know what happened after that... Cheers Paul
  8. Or you could build your own... Connoisseur Models kit, the dome and chimney aren't quite right but that only became apparent when it was photographed. The livery is remarkably pleasing, with just a touch of East End grime. I chose to build it as an 0-6-0. You never know when that extra traction will come in handy for hauling all those barrels of rum and sacks of spice around... Cheers Paul
  9. The Mk.1 Lever Frame (i.e. without the accompanying interlocking gubbins) remains on sale to any and all. In my time spent manning the Scalefour Stand, I've heard of this being used in everything from 2mm to garden railways. It's the second item down here: Scalefour Society public e-shop. HTH, Paul
  10. Which is what I intend to do ;-) I had a couple of random thoughts earlier today as to how to make the alignment easier when it comes to fit things together. I need to have a doodle in my sketchbook... Cheers Paul
  11. I have that drawing bookmarked ;-) That said, I'll be etching the hole to 0.7mm. I tried 0.8 on my trial etch of just the DC bits, and it was a bit too close to the edge when I broached the etched hole out to take 0.8mm rod. I'll actually be drawing this directly off the GA to scale for the overall sizes. I intend to make the upper part extend to the level of the bottom of a prototypical floor - you may have spotted similar in the way I etched the end handle "vees" ("ells"?) . In that way, if a kit/scratchbuild has the floor in the correct place, the height is automa
  12. As I have a couple of dozen of unmade Coopercraft wagon kits with DC1 brakes, I'm confident I have spares... That said, I won't be using them. There's something fundamentally wrong about the angle of the left-hand brake rod. If you look at this image of a built up Coopercraft N13 on the GWR.org website (http://www.gwr.org.uk/graham/cooplocomf.jpg) the rod points directly up at the middle of the wagon - almost as far back as the centre of the vee. Compare that to figure 11 in GWW Appendix. This is the "works" photo of the DC1 brakegear as fitted. The left
  13. Hi Rich, Thanks for noting that. I was aware of it, from the GA drawing. The DC1 should have left over right, rather than the more conventional right over left that you find on DC3 and Morton brakes. Chapter and verse, as always, at http://www.gwr.org.uk/nowagonbrakes.html The old casting was one of the very few that I have in my brake gear spares box which is a 9ft wheelbase. I definitely didn't have any proper DC1 brakegear at all. As this was a proof-of-concept exercise, that I could design the parts and that they would fit properly, I'm not fussed about the ove
  14. Excuse the cross-post, as the question of GWR DC1 brakes in 4mm has popped up on two different RMWeb threads in close succession. In talking about the DC1 set up, and the swan-neck lever in particular, I believe that this is what is intended: The w-irons are from the Scalefour Society, the brake vee is a spare D&S one, and the brake gear is an old 9ft casting - ABS I think. The nickel silver operating mechanism is an etch that I drew up at the start of lockdown, based on GWR General Arrangement drawings: I had a few etched when
  15. Excuse the cross-post, as the question of GWR DC1 brakes in 4mm has popped up on two different RMWeb threads in close succession. In talking about the DC1 set up, and the swan-neck lever in particular, I believe that this is what is intended: The w-irons are from the Scalefour Society, the brake vee is a spare D&S one, and the brake gear is an old 9ft casting - ABS I think. The nickel silver operating mechanism is an etch that I drew up at the start of lockdown, based on GWR General Arrangement drawings: I had a few etched when
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