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snitzl

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  • Location
    Nottingham
  • Interests
    Scratch Building Model Railways and Playing Guitar,

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  1. Hi TangoOscarMike, any complementary comments are allways welcome, as are consructive criticism and hairbrained idea's. Thankyou.
  2. Hi all, thanks for the comments. Because this loco requires a transverse cylinder, I've decided that it's probably simpler and less troublesome to have both wheel axles driven. The chassis, machined from solid brass includes provision for a compensated flexichas design with one fixed axle and the second axle, allowed to rotate about the gearbox worm axle. A pair of Tenshodo worm and wheels are used for each of the axles and a bevel gear extracted from a scrap sigma camera lens is used for the main drive. The Mashima motor maybe a little to big, we'll have to wait and see. Worm and gear locations are determined and then soldered to 2.0mm diameter silver steel, the gearbox is machined from solid brass. Assembled axle, drops into a 2.0mm square slot. Motor is mounted vertically on two spacers and secured by two countersunk screws. Thats all for now, Thanks for looking.
  3. Hi justin1985, I would suggest you look at all three blogs on Controller's, the first is an investgation into Stuart Hines original Pentroller, the second and third blogs take the original Pentroller design and use a few more common components to acheive the same end result. The blogs will explain all, Please use whatever you find usefull.
  4. Hi , The PICtroller is the modern version of Pentroller, instead of analog components, the PICtroller is micro processor controlled with auto detection on the motor types, both designs were initiated by Pendon for controlling both standard motors and more importantly for Pendon , coreless motors. After reading your link 'some reports', I'm not so sure, but I believe that Pendon use the PICtroller.
  5. Hi Regularity, Really sorry about that, I misunderstood.
  6. Hi Regularity, These controller's were developments of Stuart Hines original Pentroller, I've substituted and added extra components. Built 7 or 8 of these and given a few away, but they've never been made commercially, if you think there's a market, then please feel free to use them.
  7. Hi Oldddudders, I was a big fan of Allan Downes and found his work very inspirational back in the early 1980's, I'd like to think that perhaps just a little of his unique skills rubbed off. In one of his earlier article's , he used computer chats for the bricks ( because scale wise, they were the same size ) and stuck them on one by one, inbelievable.
  8. First of all, thanks all for the kind words, much appreciated. A loco is required for "Fun Town", something small and unusual to shunt the market stall wagons, browsing the web I came across a vertical boilered De Winton from the 1870's which had the right appearance, but I wanted if possible to include the transverse cylinder of the Albion, a locomotive built in 1848 for the South Yorkshire Railway. Another feature that I hope will be possible to include, is the curved footplate of the L.S.W.R Class 460 : 4-4-0 by William Adams. I've not actually attempted this type of modelling before on a locomotive, all loco's I've built in the past have been based on prototypes, I usually find a locomotive that appeals to me and search out the drawings, but with Fun Town, a different approach will be taken. This just might be a total disaster, we'll have to wait and see. Just to make things a little more interesting, the loco will also run on standard gauge P4 track, Protofour profile wheels, run on DCC with DCC uncoupling, Sharman's flexichas system built into the chassis and for character, the loco will be heavily distressed. De Winton from the 1870's. Transverse cylinder of the Albion. Curved Footplate of the L.S.W.R Class 460 : 4-4-0 by William Adams. Time to make a start.
  9. Thought about starting a workbench type thread for quite some time, up until now, all of my posts have been in the blog section of RMWEB. My main obsession at the present time is a project I've called Fun Town, an imaginary place were most of the scratchbuilt models are based on pure imagination. What I would like to do before settling down with the next scratchbuild, is present a few images of Fun Town to show some of which has been achieved so far. Railway Market Stalls outside the Stone built Terraced Shops. Next door to the Stone Terraced shops is The Mart, a stone building based on The Mart, Lower Parliament St, Nottingham. Fun Towns overhead Tram. Sharmans Steam Traverser located inside the Market Warehouse. A birds eye view on the walkway that links the Marts upper level to Verne's tower. Verne's flying machine on the workbench, the flying machine is DCC operated and has 3 motors and LED lights.
  10. As Anglian has suggested, you have to try the different construction methods available, whether it be card , plastic or plaster, there's plenty of detailed information on RMweb on how you go about it. Failing that, look into kit bashing, that might at least get you started.
  11. Hi Mikkel, I totally agree with you, Blogger just seems to be out there, on its own, just a little isolated.
  12. Hi Mikkel, I've discovered that I can't retain enthusiasm for railway modeling without some contact with other railway enthusiasts, so glad to be back and I've also missed some of you guy's. The lattice bridge you speak of was built for kimberley, but I also made a second bridge for Snitzl Town, there is a blog that covers the build. Regards Snitzl
  13. Modelling the Market Stall wagons for Fun Town. Searching the web for market stalls that actually ran on tracks and existed in our historic past proved fruitless, I've no doubt that when this blog get's published on rmweb, dozens of examples will turn up, if so, they might inspire further models. The type of market stall required for Fun Town did exist as a road type vehicle and was available in model form as a plastic kit by Wills, therefore the Will's model was used as a dimensional starting point. Although the model from Wills is based on a prototype of timber construction, the model presented here is all metal. Raw materials for the stalls included 10thou brass sheet, brass tube, brass wire, steel for the wheels, aluminium foil for the canopy and a little solder. During construction of the stall's, a few other possible projects sprung to mind, perhaps a stall replenish vehicle, steam tram for the customers and market stall holder's during a market stall relogation. What is Fun Town ? : Fun Town is a small table top module that can be used alone or form part of a larger unit, it fit's like a jigsaw piece to the Walls Traverser Cover to create a small 36" x 18" layout over the top of Snitzl Town's traverser. Done so far : Overhead Tram, Jules Verne's Flying Ship, Steam operated Traverser and Market Stall Wagons. Still to do : Steam Tram, Market Stall Engine with DCC uncoupler, Stall Replenish Wagon, Animated Figues, Hot Air Balloon, Interior racking & goods for the Warehouse and anything else that may be appropriate, in other words, a bit of fun.
  14. Part 2 continues modelling of the market stall wagons for Fun Town. If you've already read part 1 of Market Stall Wagons, then please skip past this intro text to the images below. Searching the web for market stalls that actually ran on tracks and existed in our historic past proved fruitless, I've no doubt that when this blog get's published on rmweb, dozens of examples will turn up, if so, they might inspire further models. The type of market stall required for Fun Town did exist as a road type vehicle and was available in model form as a plastic kit by Wills, therefore the Will's model was used as a dimensional starting point. Although the model from Wills is based on a prototype of timber construction, the model presented here is all metal. Raw materials for the stalls included 10thou brass sheet, brass tube, brass wire, steel for the wheels, aluminium foil for the canopy and a little solder. During construction of the stall's, a few other possible projects sprung to mind, perhaps a stall replenish vehicle, steam tram for the customers and market stall holder's during a market stall relogation. What is Fun Town ? : Fun Town is a small table top module that can be used alone or form part of a larger unit, it fit's like a jigsaw piece to the Walls Traverser Cover to create a small 36" x 18" layout over the top of Snitzl Town's traverser. Done so far : Overhead Tram, Jules Verne's Flying Ship, Steam operated Traverser and Market Stall Wagons. Still to do : Steam Tram, Market Stall Engine with DCC uncoupler, Stall Replenish Wagon, Animated Figues, Hot Air Balloon, Interior racking & goods for the Warehouse and anything else that may be appropriate, in other words, a bit of fun.
  15. Verne's Tower - Flying Machine. As part of Fun Town, I was thinking of modelling a hot air balloon that revolved around the large tower, but in the previous blog on Mike Sharmans vertical boiler steam traverser, Mikkel commented that the traverser was very much in the stye of Jules Verne in appearance. This got me thinking about maybe modelling the hot balloon baised on something Jules Verne might have designed, a web search was done and after browsing through many images a completly different approach was chosen. A small version of nautilus would be constructed that would be crafted from a super light weight cast iron and also include an helicopters rotor to enable flight. What is Fun Town ? : Fun Town will be a small table top layout that will include a market stall railway, overhead tram, animated figues, rotating Jules Verne flying ship, hot air balloon, steam operated traverser and anything else that may be appropriate, in other words, a bit of fun.
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