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Posts posted by [email protected]

  1. I use plungers almost exclusively. My solution is home made , costs very little, virtually invisible, does not catch fingers like wipers, permits wheels to have sideplay without loss of contact and can be easily removed for cleaning without taking the wheels off. 

     

    The photo below shows the construction but basically a piece of brass tube soldered into the frames behind the tyre has a plastic tube liner glued inside. The pickup is a piece of brass or copper wire, I use brass, with a scrap brass fret tag soldered near one end and the wire to the motor goes onto the tag.  Opposing plungers are pressed against the wheel by another bit of brass tube with one end closed off containing a spring and a plastic rod plunger.  Think toilet roll holder!  The pressure can be adjusted by shortening or lengthening the plunger.  You need less pressure than you think!

    A couple of my smaller locos use a piece of foam rubber as the pressure source.

     

    Ian.

     

    44D12FF6-F51E-4225-86F7-75FE3CC40559.jpeg.422afa2cfd17fd5bc4d4c63867abab84.jpeg

    • Informative/Useful 1
    • Craftsmanship/clever 2
  2. If you get one of the professional painters  to paint your model it will never be your own work which is recognised, it will always be an xx paint job!   
     

    At least have a go at painting, it’s not rocket science, read up on techniques and give it a go.  Even if it’s not perfect you can strip off the paint and try again. 
     

    Ian.

    • Like 1
    • Agree 2
  3. 50 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

     

    This is the proposed LMS rebuild of the GSWR Stirling 0-4-0 mineral engines, using the standard G0.5S Belpaire boiler. Drawings were prepared, then someone from Kilmarnock works pointed out that the class had all been withdrawn by about 1900. 


    Nice thought. Some of the Fower wheelers lasted until after the Great War, this one didn’t but is seen here in rude good health in 1908!

     

     

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    • Like 8
  4. 15 hours ago, airnimal said:

    Marc, I also like small odd loco' but with the numbers modelling S7 I don't think it is ever going to be feasible for any manufacturers to produce wheels for any of them. 

     

    A little bit of progress with this Furniture wagon but I am making it up as I go along whether it is going to be a runner is still open to debate. I have been on Grandad duties for the past 3 days which is harder than going to work full time. Plus I did 50 miles on the bike on Sunday which was hard work at my age but I have to keep going. Use it or lose it !

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    You are correct Mike.  There are so many different patterns and sizes of Industrial locomotive wheels that it would be impossible to cater for all.  
     

    I have made wheels, it’s not that difficult if you have the equipment, but would prefer not to have to do everything. If a range of wheel tyres in different sizes could be produced that would make wheel making a lot easier.
     

    I have no experience of 3D printing but would that be a suitable material for making the centres?  Industrial wheels are small and usually quite chunky, would the spokes be robust enough?  Some of my bigger locos have whitemetal wheel centres home cast from plastikard patterns and they have stood up to quite a bit of running without any problems.

     

    Ian.

    • Like 2
    • Informative/Useful 1
  5. Snap Mike!

    I followed a very similar path. Moving to 7mm scale from P4 I did build one loco in fine standard 0 but soon converted it to S7 and have never looked back. Being able to lift dimensions straight from a GA drawing makes modelling so much more satisfying.

     

    I am thoroughly enjoying following this build of yours. It is a bit of a cliche but modellers tend to favour the less usual prototypes when in reality they were quite rare. We have seen you produce some exquisite 'ordinary' wagons and this special you are building will truly be a 'special' example!

     

    Ian.

    • Agree 4
  6. 11 hours ago, Dave Hunt said:

    The threads here are fascinating and informative but I just want to point out that it is an indisputable fact that notwithstanding any evidence to the contrary the Midland was the finest railway on planet earth. In stating this I am completely unbiased in any way.

     

    Dave Hunt

    Chairman, Midland Railway Society.


    Facts are fine but don’t let them get in the way of a good story! It is worth remembering that the G&SWR had a close working relationship with the Midland and almost took them over, 3 times!  
     

    Ian Middleditch,

    Chairman, Glasgow and South Western Railway Association.

    • Informative/Useful 1
    • Funny 3
  7. Getting a rigid chassis square and free of twist with all the axles in the same plane is very difficult. There is only one perfect and an infinite number of almost right!  By fitting sprung or equalised bearings you remove the need for absolute square completely. 

    Even if you can built a perfectly square chassis you will only have three wheels in firm contact with the rails which compromises current collection. Of course if your track is perfectly flat!!!

    Ian

    • Agree 1
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  8. On 19/06/2020 at 19:46, CKPR said:

    No. 7 and No.20 (or maybe No.6 ?)  at the close of play this evening - No. 20 now has a new smokebox front, buffer beam and valences and has had the large hole in her boiler filled. This brings both engines to a similar state of completion and I can build them in unison from here onwards. In reality, these two engines were both built and rebuilt at Maryport and despite their very different pedigrees in model form, I am discerning a distinct family likeness, which I'm taking as indicating that I'm on the right lines.

    M&CR_7_&_20_[2].jpg

    M&CR_7_&_20_[1].jpg


     

    Hi CKPR,

     

    Would it be possible for you to take the photos with your back to the light please?  The back lighting of the subject makes the detail impossible to appreciate.

     

    Ian.

    • Agree 1
  9. I enjoy the odd browse through catalogues of yesteryear. This is one from my collection. A time when most modellers were scratchbuilders.

    For 1951 there are some interesting items illustrated especially the views of custom builds.
     

    Ian.
     

    8B8272E7-BACF-4872-B5FE-C33F5B393F92.jpeg.c70bed3d93cab02e4abde96e60c4f2ef.jpeg4C4436E1-6C8C-4C3D-A793-447F0486AD51.jpeg.3bfdecb3f7bcfa347c6358627a94a628.jpeg6E4A2FE9-025A-4EAC-B10D-804C8192E171.jpeg.1110014016956088397e3d8c08f115f9.jpeg

    • Like 5
  10. 1 hour ago, Compound2632 said:

     

    But 0-4-2 tender engines were popular in some quarters - perhaps especially among Ayrshiremen - in the 19th century.


    Yes the 0-4-2 was popular in Ayrshire but this one spent most of it’s time in Galloway working on the Port Road and Portpatrick branch!  Hence the tender cab.

     

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    • Like 7
    • Craftsmanship/clever 4
  11. Mike,

     

    I have an optivisor and am now using it for all my modelling instead of just on fiddly bits. One of the downsides of age! 
     

    However I also have a a fancy phone which does get used quite a bit but not to the detriment of the modelling time! This reply is being typed on the phone  because it is handy to do while I finish my after dinner coffee in front of the tv news.

     

    Ian.

    • Like 2
  12. 22 hours ago, airnimal said:

    Krusty, that is a possible but I have made the decision to go with just a longer inside corner plate.

    I must have been mad to attempt this drilling hundreds of holes in 3 different sizes and putting all these rivets / nuts / bolts on a simple coal wagon. It's the sort of things lighthouse keepers or long term jail birds do. And when construction is finished I have got to paint it to look like the photos.

    I have done a couple of hours this morning so to preserve my sanity will do a couple of hours out on the bike today.

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    The different sizes certainly make a difference Mike. The moulded nuts certainly look better than the rod or glued on cubes of styrene that I have used in the past.  You certainly are leading the way in quality wagon building!

     

    Can I ask a couple of questions please? Are you drilling the holes by hand or using a powered drill and where do you buy the moulded nuts?

     

    Ian.

  13. 6 hours ago, airnimal said:

    All the plans this year now look to be scrapped but at least we have a hobby we can do at home. Now we are all locked down and nowhere to go we will have to make the most of it while we can. I don't have a top draw of unbuilt kits like most modellers, only boxes of parts. 

    So out with the bits to see what we have and prepare the parts for a couple of Dia 13 bolster wagons. 

    Cleaning the cusp of the etches and modifying and preparing  the wheels still took a good few hours. 

    I have included  some photos of the modified Slaters S7 wheels and some Slaters unmodified finescale wheels. 

    All those propaganda photos by the P4 society many years ago worked for me. Remember those big chunky wheels falling off the track......

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    Agree with you completely Mike, the P4 wheel thing got me too!  
    I don’t have a stash of kits either but I do have quite a stock of wheels, motors, metal sheet and sections.  I won’t weary for something to keep me occupied plus it is good to have a legitimate excuse to get at the workbench!

     

    Keep safe and sane,

     

    Ian.

    • Like 4
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    • Friendly/supportive 2
  14. On 01/04/2020 at 16:16, Perthshed said:

    Hi, I too bought a set of etches for the G&SWR piano tank this week 01/04/2020 can you let me know which wheels i should use and if I can get some of the castings.

     Thanks,  Tony.


    I am the G&SWRA person responsible for the sale of the etches.  All gone now. They were designed some time ago by John Boyle, not as a full kit but as an aid to scratch building, and utilised a bit of spare sheet on another kit. There were no mainframes on the etch so we commissioned  profile milled ones. Original drawings and information on early Barclay locomotives is thin on the ground so John put together a drawing from basic dimensions and photos. Purchasers of the etch got a copy of the drawing but part of it is reproduced here.6A120056-2A63-460E-AFB6-EDBCD0D4F8B4.jpeg.f7063794e8d10aee3f1accbf6281f776.jpeg


    The wheels on these early locos were varied, on this example they were 3’ diameter , 6 spokes, but some had 8 spoked wheels of a different diameter.  Needless  to say there are no commercial wheels on the market which look anything like the originals. 

     

    When we got the etches originally I used some of them to build a model of 258, which became the G&SWR Works shunter on completion of the Largs branch where it had served the contractors.  In actuality I didn’t finish it as ‘Works’ but made it a freelance loco which let me use the Slaters Barclay wheels.  See my post of September 18 above.  
     

    However I still wanted to  build ‘Works’ which had 3’6”, 8 spoked, H section wheels, so during the Christmas holiday I made myself four wheels. I have now got the loco finished to painting stage, see below.


    1F81055C-D3B4-4F59-9411-7114C3E1F5E0.jpeg.506f90011ed7e88db1c36a993f498417.jpeg


    While I was in the mood for wheels, sounds like a song, I made a pattern for the 3’, 6 spoke, at the same time.  Currently away to be cast in resin but with the virus problem I don’t know when I will see the finished castings. I did however make one in solid brass just to see how it looked.

     

    Ian

     

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    • Like 14
    • Thanks 1
  15. I can recommend the nylon worm/brass worm wheel from Ultrascale.  Quite a few of my 7 mm scale locos are so fitted and run quiet and very smoothly.  The gear boxes I use are similar to the fold ups but home made from heavier gauge metal and very rigid. They have had about 15 years exhibition running and there is no obvious wear on either the worm or wheel. 
     

    Ian.

    • Agree 1
  16. Hi Mike,

     

    I don’t know how my reply has repeated out of sequence!   I have been out all afternoon and not online.

     

    The photo doesn’t show too well, just taken on my iPad, but I measured it tonight and there is just over 1mm of metal between the bottom of the recess and running surface so you could reduce the tyre diameter by almost a scale 3 1/2”.  That would go a long way to reproducing that well worn look!

     

    Ian.

     

     

    • Like 3
  17. Mike,

     

    Here is a photo of a Slaters driving wheel tyre in section.  It has been turned down from fine standard profile to S7 and you can see that there is still a lot of metal which could be removed to reduce the tyre thickness. The limiting factors are the groove and how you hold the wheel to reduce the diameter.

     

    The wheel got damaged so I thought I would have a look at the design of the tyre. 
     

    Hope this is helpful,

     

    Ian.
     

    6C5EED6D-CB23-4938-A68C-FA24175939A6.jpeg.cb1dc5c945b0ae8d9f8828b7af09522a.jpeg

    • Informative/Useful 1
  18. Mike,

     

    Here is a photo of a Slaters driving wheel tyre in section.  It has been turned down from fine standard profile to S7 and you can see that there is still a lot of metal which could be removed to reduce the tyre thickness. The limiting factors are the groove and how you hold the wheel to reduce the diameter.

     

    The wheel got damaged so I thought I would have a look at the design of the tyre. 
     

    Hope this is helpful,

     

    Ian.
     

    6C5EED6D-CB23-4938-A68C-FA24175939A6.jpeg.cb1dc5c945b0ae8d9f8828b7af09522a.jpeg

    • Like 5
    • Informative/Useful 3
  19. 12 minutes ago, airnimal said:

    Gordon Bennett *********  I have do it again ! 

    Having finished the Buxton wagon I thought I would make a quick build of a small N.S.R one plank open. 

    Simple, straightforward and nothing taxing. Or so I thought !

    I had a frame already made for a 15' wheelbase wagon in a pile of rejects, so it was easy to reduce it to 14' 6"" as the drawing. This I did but I decided it wasn't right so I scraped it and started again using the drawing from the N.S.R. wagon book. I am working from a photograph that wasn't in the book but it looks identical with detail differences. 

    I was pleased with my progress last night and sat watching the box with a glass of beer and the wagon and book in front of me. I looked to check the drawing to see what differences were between my model and the photograph in the book. 

    So I placed the model over the drawing and ********

    I hadn't noticed the dimension on the drawing said 14' 6" inside !

    Of course I have done it 14' 6" outside !

    Is this one of the signs of old age. Am I loosing it ! 

    My old boss always said its only a problem when you drop a clanger when you can't fix it.

    So if I cut off the end plank and headstocks and make new ones I think I might be able to rescue it.

    Or I might take up stamp collecting. 

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    Mike,

     

    You are not alone.  My scrap box is full of bits of metal which I have cut to the wrong size.  You would think that at our age we would remember, measure twice cut once!  However even with our little lapses, It’s still more satisfying than stamp collecting.

     

    Ian

    • Like 2
    • Agree 3
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