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phil-b259

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  1. If its so disastrous why do several other European Governments still hold controlling stakes in what are obstinately ' private' companies? DB, EDF, etc have all had success in overseas investments - DB themselves said they made a decent return on their involvement in Franchising that benefited the German Government and German rail users not the British. Governmental involvement in a French dairy company was also the main reason a hostile takeover from the American food giant didn't happen - in contrast to the UK where Cadbury was bought, then effectively ransacked with the new owne
  2. The 374s are, dimensionally speaking, exactly the same as the Siemens Vero trains used by DB in Germany. As such there is no way they will fit the UKs conventional rail network. As others have highlighted the UK Government sold off its stake in Eurostar over a decade ago - the majority of shares are now owned by the French Government (via SNCF) and a Canadian Teachers pension scheme. Were Eurostar to cease trading then the class 374 train fleet would most likely be used by the French on domestic or inter - EU train services or sold on to the likes of DB and the reaming 373s turned
  3. I am fully aware that these 4 / 6 wheel coaches are not in any way accurate representations of the prototype - but on the other hand I do not have the physical dexterity to build, let alone apply intricate lining to 'accurate' kits. Nor do I wish to join the "lets model BR 1950s / 1960s grot brigade" - my encounters with steam are of the beautifully presented locos and carriages at the Bluebell - and THAT is the look I want to replicate in model form. That is not to say I wouldn't purchase 100% accurate LBSCR or SECR 4 wheeled stock - but equally I'm not going to sit there complain
  4. The clue is the assistance of the wide crossing surface. IIRC it is actually a bridleway or some such thing and as such ramped access must be provided* even if the beach the crossing leads to is not suitable for wheelchairs or pushchairs. *Extinguishing such a right of way is a legal nightmare and you can be sure that professional complainers will be only too ready to make a case of it in the courts. There was a case at Witham on the GEML a decade or so ago where NRs proposal for a stepped footbridge was chucked out by the courts even though said Bridleway had not seen
  5. Airlines are massively polluting and pay no tax on the fuel they use. Pandemic or no pandemic the future of the planet depends on LESS flights not more - and as such Eurostar needs to be there when travel restrictions are eased. Providing taxpayer support to airports and airlines which are ruining the planet while at the same time denying it to a rail operator which is acting to reduce said pollution by removing the need to fly is perverse and should not be allowed to happen.
  6. The impacts from Schengen should not be dismissed quite so lightly. At certain times of the day large numbers of domestic French customers used Eurostar from Paris to Lille and Lille to Brussels - this meant Eurostar was not solely reliant on international passengers for revenue. Because the UK refused to be part of the Schengen area it meant that domestic and international passengers cannot mix - which at a stroke torpedoes any business case for regional Eurostar services in the UK as you will be carting a lot of Fresh air about. Not having a link to HS2 is irrelevant - using up t
  7. Not so! St Pancras is easily accessible from a wide variety of places in the South East thanks to Thameslink or SE high speed services and in better days drew significant patronage despite there also being good rail links to Gatwick and Luton airports. In pre Covid times there were a reasonable number of travellers from Surrey, Sussex, Kent, Hertfordshire Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, etc. not just Londoners using Eurostar. Yes it might be more expensive than a budget airline ticket but not everyone is obsessed by money (or wishes to be squashed into the ridiculously ti
  8. Back in the 1980s several of politically right wing newspapers (the Telegraph, The Sun, The Times, etc) ran a story about how the EC (as it was back then) was going to ‘ban’ bananas which did not have a sufficient enough curve in them... (or was it bananas that had too much of a curve? not that it really matters mind). As is usual for the British press they omitted two important points. (1) It was in fact the BRITISH GOVERNMENT who had asked for the regulation to be created in the first place and who rather than fess up when it was leaked to the press (by a young Boris
  9. There is politics and there is politics. Given every law in the UK comes into being by way of an act of parliament and parliament is a grouping of politicians virtually nothing can be 'free' of a political dimension and it is foolish to claim otherwise. This sort of 'politics' is quite wisely in my view tolerated by the moderators and allows many topics pertaining to railways, the hobby and indeed life to be properly explored in a way that would not be possible otherwise. The other sort of 'politics' is where people are effectively campaigning for their chosen politica
  10. Further problems - this time with returns.... Brexit: Retailers could burn goods stuck in EU https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-55757931
  11. As I understand it that is because Norway deliberately made sure their fishing industry got an opt out when they joined the EEA. It’s also one of the reasons they have rejected full EU membership as such an opt out would not be tolerated for EU members. The thing is the UK could probably have secured a similar opt out providing it was prepared to accept the rest of the stuff that goes with EEA membership like freedom of movement and oversight by the ECJ.
  12. EFTA is not the same thing as the single market though! They are however closely linked which is why many become confused. Technically speaking the 'single market' is a third entity known as the EEA. The EEA is run by the EU and all EU member states are part of it, but EFTA is a joint partner in the enterprise which means that a side product of being an EFTA member means you end up inside the EEA / single market. To be a member of EEA you:- (1) Still allow full freedom of movement including the right for EU citizens to reside, work and study a
  13. The goal of the changes (both in the UK and EU) are basically to capture VAT on sales from the far east to UK / EU purchasers conducted via the likes of e-bay. However it would be illegal for the EU to treat some businesses differently to others so the changes must apply to all businesses including those trading only within the EU even if the net effect is to hinder inter EU business at the same time. The other thing to remember is that vat rates vary in each member state - this means that (1) Businesses in Germany will be at a disadvantage if the VAT rate in the Nether
  14. You reap what you sow as the saying goes... Brexiters wanted to regain 'Sovereignty' - well they have, and everything that goes with it! The Beeb have also picked up on this.... https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-55734277 Although business has been having trouble from the off... https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-scotland-business-55584500 https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-55662544
  15. Fatal mistake! As was made crystal clear, for the UK to remain part of the single market post Brexit it would have to.. Continue to allow the freedom of movement (i.e. could not impose any restrictions on the amount EU citizens coming here for work / study etc Continue to be subject to the rulings of the European Courts of Justice who would have the ultimate say and sit above the Uk judical system. Continue to make a financial contribution to the EU budget. Boris, Farage and their fellow Brexiters refuse to accept this and hence the U
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