Jump to content

PMP

Members
  • Content Count

    1,625
  • Joined

  • Days Won

    1

PMP last won the day on September 27 2009

PMP had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

6,537 Excellent

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://albionyard.wordpress.com/

Profile Information

  • Interests
    Soft furnishings, Kittens, Chainsaws etc ...

Recent Profile Visitors

2,333 profile views
  1. Absolutely Rob, I’ve no idea what context out of reach means here. In addition I’d love to know what an ‘average modeller’ is too, how is that defined and how is it relevant to the purchase of a RTR locomotive?
  2. There two different footplate castings as I understand it to reflect prototype practice. Rear facing bunker steps underneath the buffers for the GW built version, and side facing bunker steps for BR/Contractor built locos. The steps on the GW build locos were subsequently changed to side facing. 9405 had BR livery and side facing steps by 1955 so the GW/side step livery combined is an unusual combination. You’d need works records to determine when 9405’s steps were modified and if it were carrying GW livery at the time or subsequently.
  3. Feel free to disagree, I’ve used Airfix and Lima too, my preference is for the contemporary Hornby model. I agree the body bands are a pita not being there for earlier models and the fan and opening doors I can happily do without. Re body bands a neat way of doing them is masking their position and then a couple of coats of car undercoat primer paint. Let it dry thoroughly, remove the masking and you have very gently raised bands in place. I’ve seen it done with microstrip too but my preference was using thick paint.
  4. They were introduced possibly as far back as the early 1970’s as a generic seat strip for their coach range including the Midland (as mentioned above) and LNWR vehicles, rather than for specific models. By aggressive sanding you can take away a large element of the seat moulding thickness, then fix them back to back as in your picture and add any partition profile to the tops of the seat.
  5. That’s helpful knowing it was a first release review sample, when you described it as ‘recent’, this livery has been re-released in the past few years. My interest (and concern), were if it were one of those, I’m relieved to hear it isn’t. Regarding it’s accuracy, there’s relatively few issues with it, none that can’t be fixed with a bit of effort. Out of the available models so far, it’s the best. At some stage someone will tell you it looks nothing like a 31, despite it looking very much like a 31, an that Triang’s first 1960’s release is far better.
  6. Which catalog number, and year of release though Tony? This is the important piece of information. Some early 31’s suffered, others didn’t and it is quite specific as it sounds as though some batches received poor quality mazak, other concurrent releases in different liveries didnt suffer, and are fine.
  7. Just to be clear I didn’t say suddenly. They have been stored appropriately for roughly 14 years, and the deterioration occurred in that time frame. https://albionyard.net/2021/02/14/mazak-rot-a-matter-of-time/ Having over the past twenty years or so had many models through the mancave from all uk and a few over seas manufacturers, these two are the only experience I have of it. They are first releases so probably around 2007 for the Scot, maybe a year or so less for the Patriot, and fall into the era where a few types from different manufacturers suffered it. I’ve not seen anyth
  8. I’d use more bracing along the lines above. Whilst you may only occasionally move it, the original design will likely have longitudinal flex particularly if heavy with scenery. As you’re using 6mm ply it’ll be lightweight so more bracing won’t significantly compromise the weight. You’ve also got the option of drilling lightening holes in the bracing, and those holes can assist with feeding a wiring loom around the board, preventing the loom from hanging and catching beneath the layout
  9. Without knowing what the design looks like it’s difficult to answer. With the information supplied I’d say yes use screws and pins too, they’ll help with the assembly fixing, but not necessarily the rigidity.
  10. https://albionyard.net/2021/02/14/mazak-rot-a-matter-of-time/ R2628/R2634 to add to the list. These were early DCC ready releases of the Rebuilt Royal Scot and Patriots. Problem areas on mine are above the front bogie, and the gear casing casting screw mount fractured.
  11. A valid observation. One thing the internet and forums like this have been useful for is when there is a serious issue, the volume of individual comments rises massively, across various platforms, and through the retail community. That isn’t the case here. Seven members have commented on ‘poor running’ and three on broken steps in the last fourteen pages. Two faulty models subsequently reported as replaced an no running issues. Undoubtedly frustrating for those concerned, but not ‘significant’ numbers. I didn’t bother counting those that said they liked their 94xx and had no pro
  12. The Bachmann 2MT comes with a replacement short coupling, which gives a significant reduction in the gap. I’ve done my two, one with Bachmanns short link and one with my own. This is my version of the close coupling. You can also improve the appearance by removing the outer wiring cover for the tender connection too
  13. I think it’s likely to be a trick of the light. a look at the model on TMC website also shows the other side. And it looks like one bogie has four, the other, six. One of my photos of 25093 looks like four, the same model , same side by Lees Locos shows six. It could be the TMC model has a bogie with mould ‘flash’ in the holes, but based on my pic vs Lees, I’d go for ‘trick of the light’
  14. Unfortunately UK model railways are not made to a common standard at all. There isn’t a Uk industry standard manufacturers have ‘signed up to’, and neither to they consistently use NMRA standards which could work in many areas. You only have to look at couplings to find there’s no standard within the same manufacturer for coupling height, let alone between other companies stock. I too would suggest looking for a Bachmann version, (see pic) a far better model and more livery varieties to choose from.
  15. The EP I’ve handled 06/08/19 has six holes both sides of the bogie. I can’t imagine that HJ uk would have issued an instruction to the factory after the EP above, take two holes out of the equaliser bar.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.