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MarkSG

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  1. The people that the Steampunk range is aimed at have no knowledge of the Bassett Lowke heritage. I suspect that Hornby decided to use the name because it has a vaguely Victorian ring to it, which fits with the product. And the steampunk stuff has obviously been successful so far, because Hornby are making more of it.
  2. Hornby's core business is toys and models. It always has been. It still is. The part of that business which appeals to us is just one aspect of the core.
  3. Thanks, that's interesting. Particularly the train noted by Roye England, that's the sort of on-the-ground observation that's really useful. I suspect, though, that both the location and the date would have made a difference. My assumption (which I'd like to see some evidence for, but seems reasonable to me) is that major freight hubs - such as Birmingham, in the photos on the Warwickshire railways website referred to earlier in the thread - would see a large number of "foreign" wagons, for the simple reason that they are likely to be the destinations of the loads they carry. I wou
  4. They were, but they've moved a lot further into that arena since the patents and design rights expired. And, of course, they knew in advance that those rights were going to expire, so they had already started the shift before they did, precisely in order to ensure the future of the company afterwards.
  5. Hornby, the company, produces loads of things that are not Hornby, the brand. Airfix, Scalextric, Corgi, etc. They're now trying to develop Bassett-Lowke as another brand that isn't directly related to normal railway modelling. If it works, that will build up the business. Remember also that the original Hornby also made Meccano. Having non-model-railway brands has always been a part of the business. Tri-ang owned Minic, Pedigree and Frog as well as their model railway brand. Bachmann have recently announced a range of Thunderbirds kits. This is perfectly normal. A business that wants to
  6. The design right in Lego bricks has long since expired. So long as you don't put the word "Lego" anywhere on them, anyone can make precise replicas of the bricks themselves. And, indeed, many manufacturers now do. That's why Lego's own business model has shifted way from simply making the bricks and towards making specific kits that are built with the bricks, because the design of the kit is still protectable. But these, of course, are Hornby's own design - they're not copying Lego's kits - so there's no infringement there either.
  7. The common pool is, of course, an absolute gift to modellers as it means pretty much any general purpose wagon can be justified almost anywhere without even needing to invoke Rule 1. There's a wonderful "Prototype for anything" photo of the Wisbech and Upwell tramway showing a J70 hauling a set of vans from each of the Big Four companies. But, statistically, the most common wagons at any location would be those of the "home" company, so an evenly split mix-and-match would be somewhat unrealistic. You do need a majority of your wagons to be from the company or region you are modelli
  8. The cowcatchers are removable, so there isn't actually any difference between partially and fully unskirted, as you can interchange between them. Spare cowcatchers are included, because the default ones have a hole for the NEM couplings but if you prefer a more authentic appearance with three-link couplings you can use the more authentic ones without the cut-out. Or you can remove them completely, to give the loco its main line running appearance. What you can't do is interchange between side skirts and no side skirts. If the model has them, they're not removable, and if it doesn't
  9. It does look nice. Quite apart from the fact that it's spot on for my W&U layout, the external bracing on the doors gives it quite a distinctive appearance that will look good in a train of mixed vans.
  10. MarkSG

    Rapido Swag

    I'd rather be a Grade A certified Nerd than be on British Rail.
  11. In no particular order: Railex, Stafford and Cheltenham. The first two because they're the best big shows within my usual travelling distance, and the latter because it's my nearest regular and always a really good show for a small exhibition. When I lived in Stoke, my top three would have been Stafford (again), Wigan and Manchester. The latter two are too far away from where I live now to justify a day trip, but I do visit that part of the world fairly regularly on business and I've been lucky enough to be able to combine that with a visit to one or the other on a few occasions wh
  12. Update from Oxford Rail on Facebook: "Engineering samples are due to arrive this week for approval. Details to follow shortly" https://www.facebook.com/oxfordrail/posts/2848445065367792?comment_id=2859669760911989 So if all goes well, we may see some photos of pre-production samples fairly soon.
  13. Yes, they were. See, for example, these photos from the 50s and 60s: http://sutherland.davenportstation.org.uk/aaprint/coa.html
  14. The red livery appears to be Millom Ironworks. See, for example, these links: https://preservedbritishsteamlocomotives.com/andrew-barclay-works-no-929-alexandra-0-6-0st/ https://preservedbritishsteamlocomotives.com/works-no-2333-david-0-4-0st/ Both of these went to Carnforth after being sold for preservation. The first of those links is the main loco in photos 7 and 9 at the top; it wouldn't surprise me if the second is the other red loco in photo 9. I can't find any more prototype photos of the red livery, but it's appeared on models as well:
  15. I'm not sure that the red loco is a Peckett. The second photo clearly shows that the tanks have flat sides, which to me looks more like the Andrew Barclay that Hattons did a model of. [Edit] Yes, I'm pretty sure it's this one: https://preservedbritishsteamlocomotives.com/andrew-barclay-works-no-929-alexandra-0-6-0st/ [second edit] And, according to that page, it was at Carnforth, so that does seem to pin down the location as well.
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