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jamie92208

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jamie92208 last won the day on July 25

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  • Location
    Charente Maritime, France
  • Interests
    Midland railway, Horse trams, Church
    Cycling

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  1. You get someone else to build it for you. Jamie
  2. From fading memory, the local all stations service to Carlisle finished in 72, I remember riding it just before it finished and the driver let me come in the cab for the whole ride. He regaled me with stories of driving snow plough trains in the 62/63 winter. Anyway the down platform was removed after that. Dales Rail started up in about 76 or 77 and it had gone by then. The Friends of the S & C campaigned hard for reinstatement and I think it got done after Michael Portillo 'saved' the line. Hope the history isn't boring eveyrone. I grew up at Giggleswick with a view of 2 m
  3. Lots of You tube videos of such things happening I came across one on how to restore a vice, and it wasn't the type of vice that needed an age restriction. Jamie
  4. My apologies I looked at the wrong image, however with the lime coated buildings in the background I would go for Horton. The quarry there was a big operation and there were buildings in that area between the kilns and the main line. Sorry about the confusion. Jamie
  5. I'm not sure when the quarry at Ribblehead closed down. At that time the down platform was opposite the up platform. The quarry then closed but was reopened as a loading point for granite from Ingleton sometime, I think in the early 70's. The down platform was demolished and a new conne tion put in with the points where the down platform used to be. When Dales Rail started the northbound trains couldn't stop at Ribblehead. A new platform in the current position was built later. I've no memory of what buildings were there. However Horton was a much bigger quarry and the buildings w
  6. It looks more Settle and Carlisle to me probably at the northern end that I don't know so well. There appears to be some large industrial buildings to the right behind the loco. On a second look Horton in Ribblesdale and possibly Ribblehead when the quarry was still operating look like possibilities. Jamie
  7. That must have been the one near Christmas. An ex US Marine ISTR, a bad do. As to the various invites. We hope to travel once safe after Vaccinations. A coffee at Sarthe sounds a great idea. The Muddy Hollow is not too far from Stafford and we hope to spend a night or two with a friend there on our way back home. Sounds like a plan is coming together. Jamie
  8. Good evening. Starting wing tonight with another of Tornado, doing what it was built to do. Then we move on to the 20th October and another day out to Glasgow. Our first destination was Lanark which seemed a fairly bleak place. However there was some sort of track machine in the other platform to add interest. We then set off to do the Hamilton Circle. but I didn't get any photos there. However Hamilton was devoid of any obvious Academicals but we did find proof that the missing link is alive and breeding in the area, at least three specimens were
  9. Not a lot has happened over the last month. The modelling mojo seems to have got up and gone but a lot of hard work has been done in the garden. However today that changed. I found out some time ago that the main station board has warped and there is a dip of about 10mm in the middle of it which creates a sort of ski jump in the middle of the single slip at the west end. I need to put a piece of steel under it to sort it. This board was the first one I built and I tried two different methods of bracing under it. Obviously they didn't work well. I decided to take the board out
  10. The book is superb. I could either post it to you or hand itbover at a service area whilst en route to the ferry in due course. Sarthe services are a regular calling point for us. Jamie
  11. Thanks for that, I obviously misread the class number in the photo. It was definitely the 2-10-0's. The picture was of the Shamokin turn with the helpers on an ore train. Phil Hastings and David P Morgan did a fabulous photo essay about the "Shamokin Shifter" in their book, "The Mohawk that Refused to Abdicate and other tales of steam". I must get that book out and re read it. The photography is outstanding and David Morgan's prose is wonderful. Jamie
  12. Whereabouts on the Paris Toulouse line will you be Joe. Jamie
  13. Thanks for that. I did have a think about it being a 153 leading. I think that the reason the West Yorks batch stayed as 155's was because they were owned by WY Metro who wanted to keep them as complete units. The remainder were owned by BR. Jamie
  14. Good evening from a dark Charente. We are still in London on 27-8-2009. After being south of the river for the morning and early afternoon we headed north to Willesden Junction. A 56 was heading towards the West London Line past the scrap yard. Then a 378 came along from Clapham Junction heading East. Whilst a 321 in what I think was Silverlink livery headed north. We then skip forward to the 7th October and I had hear that something special was heading north from Leeds so headed down to Armley Road as what I think is a Northern 156 headed out towards Harroga
  15. It's definitely Giggleswick with the loco shunting the Spencers Lime sidings. They were on the north side of the line. I would say it was mid 50's by when the sidings were supplied with lime from Giggleswick quarry by three old 4 wheel lorries. These then took coal back to the quarry to fire the kilns. The traffic used to be handled by an overhead cableway that was dismantled in the late 50's. Mr Greenhow was the station master and the drinking water was delivered by the first DMU each morning in a large can. I used to watch this shunt on an afternoon when I was supposed to be running rou
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