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Giles

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Giles last won the day on November 15 2013

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    http://gilesfavell.com/By%20Giles.htm

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  1. I know the occasional lorry isn't to everyone's taste - but never mind! I have silver soldered the tipper body frame together, with the opening tail-gate. (MDF drop-sides and headboard timbers) The tail-gate should of course lock when down so that the load doesnt get spilt. In reality this is of course a manual operation, but for RC, this is going to have to be an automatic mechanical system. So...... the tailgate is held closed by a pair of pivoting latches, which are operated by a rod forward on the tipper frame. This terminates in a bell-crank, which, when lowered hits a block or plate, and forces the catches to rise and trap the tail-gate. It actually works as well..... 2019-08-17_07-04-12 by giles favell 2019-08-17_06-59-39 by giles favell, on Flickr Rc tipper by giles favell, on Flickr
  2. Giles

    Copper Wort

    I'm ashamed to say that I've only just found this thread - and what a glorious layout! The buildings are just sumptuous, and the whole thing is full of interest, making you want to peer into every nook and cranny. This is one that I shall drive miles to see! Wonderful!
  3. I know the occasional lorry isn't to everyone's taste - but never mind! I have silver soldered the tipper body frame together, with the opening tail-gate. (MDF drop-sides and headboard timbers) The tail-gate should of course lock when down so that the load doesnt get spilt. In reality this is of course a manual operation, but for RC, this is going to have to be an automatic mechanical system. So...... the tailgate is held closed by a pair of pivoting latches, which are operated by a rod forward on the tipper frame. This terminates in a bell-crank, which, when lowered hits a block or plate, and forces the catches to rise and trap the tail-gate. It actually works as well..... 2019-08-17_06-59-39 by giles favell, on Flickr 2019-08-17_07-04-12 by giles favell, on Flickr Rc tipper by giles favell, on Flickr
  4. Personally I think a lot can be done with the design of the layou itself. I built Denton Brook (and The End of The Line) to be at a height of just under 1100mm nominally, but both were designed to be three dimensional, and viewed from low angles as well as normal heights and give an interesting and plausible picture from a wheelchair, even though they wouldn't be able to see the surfaces at the highest levels. It worked, and on a number of occassions I have had very happy convesrations with people in wheechairs who are enjoying the scenics and the action. I operate from tall stools from self-preservation from front/side, which also gives good view and communication.
  5. And next up is a tipper..... I think I'm making this just to learn about the problems - I don't need a tipper lorry really.. The donor is a TK artic, chopped. I can use the cab and the front of the chassis, and needed to scratch build a new longer chassis to graft on. The tipper mechanism is powered by a little 6mm diameter gear motor, driving a M2 bearing mounted lead screw. This all occupies the space normally assigned to the drive motor, so a smaller, 8mm diameter gear motor has been substituted, and crammed in, and this drives the rear axle via a cardan shaft. It's been tested to make sure it works so far...... 1:43 Tipper by giles favell, on Flickr
  6. I've had to squeeze a motor in the space that's left after fitting the tipper mechanism. There's no room for my usual N20, so I fitted the lovely little 8mm diameter gear motor that I also fitted to the Mechanical Horse. I was worried that it wouldn't be strong enough - but it is! It also necessitated the use of a cardan shaft, so I made UJs form 3mm tube and 0.7mm NS wire, as per OtherPlanet's method. There's no RC yet - this is simply a test to make sure the transmission works..... Th
  7. I know this has been done many times, but I thought I'd have a look at it....... The donor vehicle (well, the front end...) is the Bedford TK, and the brass chassis will be grafted on to it. I still have to sort space for the traction motor. I used Mod 0.4 bevel gears in order to make space for the tipping mechanism, which needs to be as low as possible in order to get some mechanical advantage on the pivot. The tipper motor is a 6mm diameter 60rpm gearmotor from ebay, driving an M2 shaft.
  8. On the back of this, I have been experimenting with viable differential gearboxes, and built two different types. One with four bevel gears, which is 13mm x 8.5mm diameter, and the other a spur gear type which is 7.5mm wide x 18.3mm diameter, Both have their uses, but on the whole, the bevel gearbox is much easier to make, and is perhaps more versatile. Differentials 1 and 2 by giles favell, on Flickr Differential 2 by giles favell, on Flickr
  9. As some know, the latest arrival to the factory at Denton Brook is an Aveling Porter Traction Engine (owned by a Manager there I believe - he likes to play...) This radio controlled model is based on a Duncan's Models white metal kit, with working motion added, wheels machined down and neoprene tyres fitted. A 400mAh battery under the canopy will run it for most of the day. A 120rpm motor is fitted transversly in the firebox driving halfway up the laser-cut gear train. This is my first try at something like this, and a lot has been learned..... TE1 by giles favell, on Flickr
  10. I do like that...... that's nice.....!
  11. Lovely! An Austin 7 is pushing it, size wise - it will be a charmer...!
  12. I've been a passed driver on two preserved lines, and therefore driven whatever happened to be rostered. I thoroughly enjoyed the years I was involved, but I lived quite a way from the lines, and that made for very long days - travelling, lighting up - a days work and then disposing, followed by another couple of hours drive home ...... I then built a 10 1/4 live steamer, and a group of us built a railway to run a our locos on, and the building of the railway was great fun - the running of it, less so. I confess that when things stop being fun (that are supposed to be fun) I tend to move away from them, rather than have miserable time doing it. I loved working the full sizes stuff, I learned loads, I'm really glad I did it - but I don't miss it, and I can't see that I would ever go back to it. Politics is rife and absolutely inevitable with any group of people, and that can sometimes get in the way. There is something wonderful about opening the regulator on a loco, but there is also something wonderful in completing a model you've just been slaving over!
  13. I love the weathering in this scale! It makes all the difference.....
  14. You can also get "Bendy MDF' which has a multi-slotted reverse face, intended for curving (in one plane). I used this on The End of The Line, with a gloomy over-cast sky 2017-10-03_02-14-32 by giles favell, on Flickr 2017-10-03_02-15-42 by giles favell, on Flickr
  15. Nice...... I too have the 54:1, and I think it is the ideal ratio, giving a lovely range of spèeds. It really is looking good!
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