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Bloodnok

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    major_bloodnok

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  1. I started another thread dealing with the Maunsells in the train -- I now have a plan for what to do with those. As far as I can tell, the difference between a Maunsell boat train second and a Maunsell third of the same period is entirely interior and decals, so I should be good to reproduce what I need for that from Hornby shells. I know the 6 compartment brake seconds received Malachite pre-war, but none of the other coaches did. Given the fact that a) Hornby never did a low-window 6 compartment brake in Malachite, and b) Hornby's interpretation of Malachite is ... questionable, I'll be
  2. What are the best ways to track down which Pullman (or at least, which type) would have run in what train? I have a family photograph of my great grandfather driving H1 Atlantic 2038 'Portland Bill' at the head of the Newhaven Boat Train in 1945. As Bachmann have recently announced this loco (albeit in Malachite, not the black it had at this date) I'm looking to re-create a post-war Newhaven Boat Train. Several descriptions of this train indicate it regularly had a Pullman in the formation. But ... which one? A description I have from 1929 says it was a 12-wheel Pullman. How lon
  3. That was a wonderfully evocative tale. Thanks for writing that out, I felt like I was there tagging along with the boys I can't reach back that far, or take everyone along to anywhere nearly as exotic as Grantham. So here's "A day out at ... Purley ... in 19 ... 88". Actually, this isn't really a day out. More like many separate half hours. I have no idea why we were in Purley, but we were. I was 8 at the time, and while I have plenty of memories from that age I don't have a complete record. The actual purpose of the trip obviously wasn't important enough to stick in my
  4. Did anything come of this? It does sound interesting
  5. Given I'd need to be re-doing numbers on doors (and the coach number too), that would probably be a suitable source. I'll keep an eye out for those ones.
  6. Thanks, that confirms what I thought. With the requirement to shorten/extend the train in response to seasonal demand, that makes sense. All are recorded as low-window versions, restriction 4, and the brakes being 6 compartment rather than 4 compartment. <Glares at Hornby>. Did you even make a 6-compartment low-window brake in Malachite? I can find one in Olive, but not Malachite... Do you happen to know if/when the others received Malachite? Dad has decided he doesn't want to paint the loco black (apparently it looks nicer
  7. A bit more digging. From here: https://railwaywondersoftheworld.com/newhaven.html This description is from 1929, so rather before the period I'm interested in. But I've also seen a reference (that annoyingly I now can't find again!) that the immediately post-war boat trains were using the same pre-war boat train sets initially. Would this just be the rest of the set, or would that 12 wheel Pullman car still have been in the rake in 1945? I've also seen a photo of 20003 hauling the Newhaven boat train in 1950 with the first coach clearly being a Carmine/Cream Bulle
  8. Yes. Clive has posted a picture of a cut-n-shut trailer brake second on the previous page -- it looks like you need to take the brake part from a DMBS and transplant it into a TS.
  9. Don't discount Lima 101 centre cars yet. I don't believe Bachmann ever did a TS for their Class 101 DMU. I've only ever seen 2 car sets. That leaves you looking at the Hornby 101 -- and that is the Lima tooling. While Hornby tooled a new chassis for the motor car, they did not for the trailers. It's the same chassis under genuine Lima examples too. I'd expect you can get replacement axles (either from Hornby or 3rd party) if the Lima axles are too coarse for current trackwork.
  10. This photo is in my family collection: The driver in this photo is my Great Grandfather, Thomas Arthur Moody. The family description with this photo was that the occasion was the first boat train after the war. My dad and I have both done a little digging, and been able to refine that a bit. It appears that the date may actually have been Jan 15th, 1945, so not strictly "after the war", but you can tell why someone might have recorded it that way. The loco is H1 Atlantic 2038 'Portland Bill', and it's the Newhaven boat train specifically. Am I right in thinking the loco
  11. Unbelievably, three and a half months later, I did indeed find "the one that went 'ping'". It was hiding in the crease between the carpet and the wall. I'm not sure how it avoided all the vacuuming of sawdust and so on that's happened in the mean time. It must have been well stuck in that gap...
  12. I did another timelapse of building some electronics. This is a four-way switchable ABC braking generator: Did I find a better camera angle this time?
  13. I think that's what allows them to avoid the yellow panel requirement. It's also rather reminiscent of the XPT light arrangement. Now that would be a livery to truly irk some purists...
  14. I've been installing more train detectors. I've reached the point where all the track is now powered. This means for the first time I've been able to run a train completely around the layout: ... Next task is to do things with the block occupancy data beyond just displaying it on a panel. This means implementing some signalling logic, and then driving ABC modules from the signal state.
  15. Having seen more than one discussion about just how massive a bike it would have to be to weigh nineteen tons, yeah, I'll take that bet...
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