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Ravenser

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Ravenser last won the day on January 5 2011

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  1. I've done this with Blacklade in the context of a Minories style layout . Photos of the fiddle yard are few and far between , but the general effect should be obvious - a distant backscene , and the actual scenic break provided by a much lower row of Scalescenes arches The layout is worked from the front, and it works - but you really don't want to be putting things on the rails in the front road as it is tight under the scenic break. The back two FY roads are more suitable , though the back one is tight against the backscene... There is a Kadee permanent magnet in there , which is very useful for freeing incoming locos from their train : this is the longest FY road , so i'ts the one used for loco-hauled substitutes . It's also the only practical option for a consisted DMU formation, and it is the far end of the run-round loop - functions that operationally can be in conflict [ I can't run round the engineers' train until I've got the loco-hauled substitute back into Pl.3...] The "scenic cover" is a fuelling point - effectively a fourth fiddle yard road (here we are running kettles in the "funny trains" period. A station pilot has proved quite useful)
  2. I'm not sure it's actually too long and thin (though in an ideal world it might be 7 x 50' coaches not 8) The scenic weakness seems to me that great expanse of empty backscene: some group of decent scenic flats about half way down , like a warehouse or a brewery or the back of a department store , might help
  3. Ratio & Son... I think the business passed through two generations of the Webster family before Peco bought it
  4. Somebody did a Jinty to MSWJR 0-4-4T conversion, written up in Railway Modeller in the late 70s
  5. This opens up a whole can of worms. Which pop stars are cuts and shuts of which others?
  6. I'm no expert , but I have a feeling that 4 plank would be more usual for both general opens and freight in the 19th century. The GN built 4 plank opens to the end, the H&B seems to have used them widely (H&B stock represents 1880s practice - and it seems they barely updated anything until around 1910..), and I think I've seen early 20th cent shots of 4 plank PO wagons
  7. D&S did whitemetal kits for some pretty early LNWR vans and SER/LCDR opens. Might be hen's teeth to find now
  8. ModelRail Scotland claims to have an even higher gate Ally Pally and York must be in the 10-12,000 bracket for attendance So, assuming that ModelRail Scotland and Ally Pally have minimal overlap, you should have around 25,000 unique visitors to Ally Pally + Model Rail Scotland combined To suggest that 1 in 4 of all those with any degree of involvement in the hobby attend one or other seems too high. To suggest it's 1 in 8 feels more credible. 1 in 8 would imply 200,000 involved in the hobby
  9. Closing the pubs at 10pm is NOT a curfew. A curfew is when the police can arrest you for being outside your home during certain hours, as in Melbourne . Or , in drastic cases where soldiers are authorised to shot anyone on the streets... I'm old enough to remember when all pubs had to close at 11pm , nationwide, by law. This went on for many decades . Nobody ever called it a curfew . We called it "Closing time" As a practical measure it will seriously curb the "lads' [and girls'] night out" , and it should make it relatively difficult to go to 2 or 3 pubs during a night out. Since there's clear evidence that's one significant way the virus spreads, that will reduce transmission. But it's far less damaging for the pubs than a total shutdown
  10. It's a long time since I dabbled with stamp collecting as a boy - but I think a pre-decimal version of the current "definitive" stamps was issued, probably around 1968-9. So with a stamp from the original EIIR definitive set your kit really can't be later than about 1968 Put another way - I cannot ever remember seeing a stamp like that "in real life" , so that pushes it back to the 1960s ; and Ratio were certainly in Dorset by 1975-6. The coke wagon and the Tube C had gone from the range by then - probably several years gone. If the Coke wagon kit was "new" - it had to go through its entire production life by the early 70s. It's a sobering thought that our current basic stamp design has been with us for over 50 years - longer than even the Victorian "penny red" The extension planks above ("raves") make the coke wagon de facto an 8 planker - the gaps probably make it roughly equivalent to 9 plank . So it isn't really a 5 planker. I assume that this was done a] to lighten the overall structure and reduce the centre of gravity and b] to enable the wagon to be converted down to a 5 planker (commonly used by small coal merchants, rather than major collieries and big users) I have an unbuilt Ratio coke wagon in the cupboard (second -hand : I'm not that old)
  11. I too am the owner of a Lima 442-class.. And I think this might be a real one - the photo quality is grotty but I think there are 5 digits in the loco number up top, not 4 Hornsby, Main Northern, 1979
  12. Quite a lot of the Skaledale ordinary building are actually from Lincolnshire, although coming from the town in question I can confirm that business names have frequently been swapped round between buildings
  13. For clarity's sake , are you talking about railway buildings or ordinary lineside buildings?
  14. Extend the sidings into a goods shed. In inglenook mode you can only work with wagons on the visible part of the sidings - the goods shed is out of bounds A 5 wagon train looks a bit odd, and the length of the roads should at least allow for 5 wagons plus brake van. And just off the top of my head - goods sheds in such locations were often multi-level. To get round the problem of restricting the movement of the traverser , the third siding can be access to a wagon hoist. The front of this provides a place to park the brake van during shunting The very brave could even have a working hoist taking wagons up to a cassette mounted above the traverser....... All entirely authentic in such locations
  15. Painting and a few figures should sort it out. I've done one Dapol LMS non-gangway
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