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Pete the Elaner

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About Pete the Elaner

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  • Location
    30 minutes from London on the WCML
  • Interests
    It's a fun hobby. Please remind me if I appear to forget.
    My home layout: http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/120795-south-hampstead/#entry3387669

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  1. If you are thinking of trying 3d printing in order to produce some coaches, then I expect you will be overwhelmed & disappointed with how difficult something like that is. I started a few months ago because I wanted window frames which I found very difficult to get consistent by making them from styrene. What I wanted was different to anything available commercially. The first windows took me hours to design because I was also learning how to use the software and that was only straight lines & right angles. I have got that down to about 5-10 minutes. I have also designed a few other things like detail parts but the subtle curves of coach sides make it something I would not consider. It is not a cheap solution but good for making bespoke items, especially when you need several identical ones.
  2. The same is true for other things. If continually rebuilt, a real loco can last forever, but it can get to a point when the rebuild costs more than replacing it with something brand new (& possibly better).
  3. I have a 5 car 220 (I didn't know such a model existed until I saw it on sale S/H). The train is slow, managing around a scale 60-65mph, but I noticed the coaches did not roll very freely, so I tried the motor vehicle on its own. A centre car running around with no driving ends looks a bit strange but its speed increased to something like 100-110. 60-65 would be fine for my layout, but I am not happy that the trailer coaches are making the motor work so hard. That was a few years ago & because the model is not typically what I would run, it has not been on the layout for a few years (& to be honest, I don't even know where it is). When I do run it again, I will see what I can do to lessen the rolling resistance of the trailer vehicles.
  4. Most of what I see on social media (including here) seems to be about what we are allowed to do, not what should really be for the best. Has anyone checked the UK figures lately? https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk The steady drop in Infection rates had stalled a couple of weeks ago, but this now seems to have recovered & is falling very slowly again. The death rate is slightly behind this. Over the last 7 days, 3 had been higher than the same day the previous week. Restrictions for businesses such as restaurants, pubs & shops reflect that these provide employment which does not apply to a social event or club such as a model railway club. With these figures in mind, is it really such a good idea to be getting back? I miss being able to see my friends & working on the club project together. Getting back together sooner rather than later will prolong the time it takes before many places are open properly again.
  5. As above. Insulated joiners on the end of each frog part. I always do this then re-feed because smaller sections are much easier to troubleshoot & are less likely to be problematic in the first place. The way you've described your pointwork, it does electrically behave like an 'Electofrog' point.
  6. If it is relevant at all, pubs, clubs & restaurants can open with certain guidelines on July 4th, but sports clubs may not. This includes snooker clubs, which in the context of distancing are not very different from model railways clubs.
  7. I have also passed a sign for a model shop in Silom before. It seemed to be upstairs so I expect it was a small place but I did not remember seeing it last year when I was there. It was closer to Sala Daeng BTS than it was to Silom MRT: if you exit Sala Daeng BTS facing the Silom Centre & walk at street level towards Silom MRT it was on the right. That is all very well if you go to Bangkok for any reason. It makes London seem quite calm! If there is no commercial support, there is a little you could do to model Thai railways: they have some class 158s but they run on metre gauge track, so re-gauging them to TT would make them more accurate than OO. The Suvarnabhumi link uses trains similar to UK class 360s, but with large air con units on the roof, so it is a shame Bachmann's class 350 tooling has not been modified to cope with 360s too. I am not sure how interesting a layout the airport line would be though. Being 50' in the air would make things more difficult & a bit awkward to hide the entrances to your fiddle yards.
  8. This is especially true if you are running a sequence at an exhibition. If a loco fails for any reason, you can substitute a spare without having to record the change on paper or mentally. The reverse is true if you have a track failure in the fiddle yard, although this is far less likely than a train fault.
  9. Cavalex intended to do those along with the class 91. I have not heard much about that lately though so I don't know if these are still planned. Maybe if they remind Hornby, it will prompt them to compete?
  10. RE: generator vehicles - yes, with the associated costs of running it. Would that be much less than a diesel loco which also provides the power? But many are attracted to preserved lines because of steam power & heritage lines are not exactly overflowing with surplus cash, especially right now. Unlike Mk1s & earlier coaches which were built upwards from a chassis, a Mk3's body is an integral part of its design & is what provides its superior strength. They are also 10' longer than anything which preceded them. I can understand entirely why heritage railways would want to avoid them but I just feel that if they did, it would be a shame because they are a significant design in railway history.
  11. RE: generator vehicles - yes, with the associated costs of running it. Would that be much less than a diesel loco which also provides the power? But many are attracted to preserved lines because of steam power. Unlike Mk1s & earlier coaches which were built upwards from a chassis, a Mk3's body is an integral part of its design & is what provides its superior strength. They are also 10' longer than anything which preceded them. I could understand why heritage railways would want to avoid them but I just feel that would be a shame because they are a significant design in railway history.
  12. I have occasionally seen 4 or 5 locos running together. 45637 Windward Islands was on the same train as 46202 Princess Anne when they were destroyed at Harrow in 1952. It was only there as a stock move.
  13. I have occasionally seen 4 or 5 locos running together. 45637 Windward Islands was on the same train as 46202 Princess Anne when they were destroyed at Harrow in 1952.
  14. It makes sense to move as much as possible with 1 path rather than send things individually.
  15. Maybe. Maybe not. The reason phone cameras are so good for getting lots in focus (a large depth of field) is that their sensors is so small. This makes them excellent for most situations, including close-ups & landscapes. Sometimes it is desirable to take photos with very long exposures, like 2-4 minutes. I am not sure any phones will do this. It is often desirable to open the aperture to blur out anything in front of behind the subject, thereby drawing attention to it. This does not really a small sensor like that found in a phone.
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