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Found 405 results

  1. Hello John, Thanks for commenting. Thought I'd try all Peco parts (cheap, easily available) wish they did 1.5mm Check rail chairs. The Vee is standard Peco which went together spot-on at 1:6, the wing rails must be 1:8+ though, as I had to increase the bend to fit the Templot template (thanks Martin). I've been happy with C+L chairs/solvent/wood timbering in 4mm before, this time I ended up using araldite on all the chairs. I should have made longer Check rails, but they seem to do the job. The next one will be better.
  2. METAMORPHIC ROCK is ANY OF A CLASS OF ROCKS THAT RESULT FROM THE ALTERATION OF PREEXISTING ROCKS IN RESPONSE TO CHANGING ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS, SUCH AS VARIATIONS IN TEMPERATURE, PRESSURE, AND MECHANICAL STRESS, AND THE ADDITION OR SUBTRACTION OF CHEMICAL COMPONENTS. The underlying rocks of Bosemlin are plywood and deal and I am altering these by a process involving the application of a saw and drill slowly turning them into sawdust. Yes, I am still rebuilding the landscape at the River End. I shall bullet point the actions taken lest this episode becomes a lengthy description about cutting plywood. Although as the Corona Virus lockdown proceeds even reading such a diatribe could be a light relief from listening to politicians wittering on with excuses about why nobody in the UK has actually be tested and there’s only enough PPE for a St John’s Ambulance Treatment Unit in Hawick. Exaggerate? Me? Never! In fact I’ve changed my mind. I’m only posting photos. Each is said to be worth 1000 words. You decide. I am never sure where the actual junction at Boscarne is. That is to say which end of the lines. Here are the diverging lines. This is the final Templot. More about Templot another time. The approximate positions of the two river bridges. The actual height of the bridge is a bit more than half that allowed. The extra height allows more landscape flexibility. Bird eye view of the final curve alignments. Nothing less than about 38 inches. And the view from outside. It has taken me quite a while to extend the baseboards and devise the curve and also get it level. Still some woodwork to do at this end but the main elements are in. Quite a lot of the scenery at this end will only be properly visible from inside the layout. Thanks for reading. Stay safe! View the full article
  3. Metamorphic rock, any of a class of rocks that result from the alteration of preexisting rocks in response to changing environmental conditions, such as variations in temperature, pressure, and mechanical stress, and the addition or subtraction of chemical components. The underlying rocks of Bosemlin are plywood and deal and I am altering these by a process involving the application of a saw and drill slowly turning them into sawdust. Yes, I am still rebuilding the landscape at the River End. I shall bullet point the actions taken lest this episode becomes a lengthy description about cutting plywood. Although as the Corona Virus lockdown proceeds even reading such a diatribe could be a light relief from listening to politicians wittering on with excuses about why nobody in the UK has actually be tested and there’s only enough PPE for a St John’s Ambulance Treatment Unit in Hawick. Exaggerate? Me? Never! In fact I’ve changed my mind. I’m only posting photos. Each is said to be worth 1000 words. You decide. I am never sure where the actual junction at Boscarne is. That is to say which end of the lines. Here are the diverging lines. This is the final Templot. More about Templot another time. The approximate positions of the two river bridges. The actual height of the bridge is a bit more than half that allowed. The extra height allows more landscape flexibility. Bird eye view of the final curve alignments. Nothing less than about 38 inches. And the view from outside. It has taken me quite a while to extend the baseboards and devise the curve and also get it level. Still some woodwork to do at this end but the main elements are in. Quite a lot of the scenery at this end will only be really visible from inside the layout. Thanks for reading. Stay safe!
  4. Famous last words but, as I've fixed the County's roof in place yesterday, it hit the bridge both on the up and down lines right on the edge. I assumed that the chimney would be the most vulnerable but these must have been built to the extremes of the loading gauge. No problem will just have to raise the bridge which thankfully is also not yet fixed in place. As an express, the County will never stop at Berrington and Eye. I did check but it hits the loading dock which is built in the yard to tighter tolerances so no dropping off horse boxes! I set the platform edges in Templot when designing the layout and built them to that. It was still worth checking; I have a couple of 70' coaches to build that will go behind the County. They were marshalled on the Birkenhead to South West services. I think I might have to check the swing on these too for clearance as both platform are on curves.
  5. I downloaded Templot, what a great program / tool that is. Thanks.
  6. hayfield

    Dabble in EM.

    Especially with Templot being free I cannot see why anyone should even contemplate chopping up a C&L plan, all you will get is a plan with a series of doglegs, not necessarily spaced out evenly. For longer Radii get twp people and a piece of string. One person acts as the centre point and just keep lengthening it until the arc of the string matches the arc of the track. Or if you wish to draw a radii, tie a pencil to a piece of string, measure out the radius you require, pin the center point and draw the radius line. Unless you are a perfectionist it doesn't have to be mm exact. Or use a track setter, the radii is printed on it
  7. hayfield

    Dabble in EM.

    Does not come as a kit put as individual parts. I thought the EM Gauge Soc sold these bases, but I can only see the universal point and crossing pack. Certainly they are available from the Scalefour society, I buy then at their shows.The common crossing will work on a curved turnout, which you could easily use on a curved Templot template to your chosen radii (this is the hardest part done for you).I can always email a PDF if you give me details of radii and crossing angle. Curved turnouts are just as easy to make as straight ones. The additional switch and common crossing packs are good value at £2 each, most folk have the standard and slide chairs if track building, bridge chairs a bit dearer at £8.50 but thats for 100 which will last for ages, check chairs costs the same but enough for 10 turnouts, whilst the cost of some of these chairs add up you are saving money on not using standard chairs. Don't forget the functional fishplates both in plastic and brass. But you could equally make a decent turnout from the basic bits The additional switch chairs make one left and one right hand turnout, you are left with several half chair pieces, and if used , would be cost neutral with standard chairs, the common crossing chairs makes one of the following 1-5,6,7,8,10, if all used again will be cost neutral on the saving of cutting up chairs, Check chairs also are about cost neutral against chopping up standard chairs. A larger initial outlay but looks so much better and more or less cost neutral As far as the special chairs are concerned C&L were not in the game however Phil is in the process of updating his sprues 2 bolt are out now and 3 bolt in the next couple of weeks. each pack contains 250 standard chairs, 2 bridge chairs, 2 J (joint) chairs and 2 types of fishplate, 350 parts in all for £22. Dearer than Exactoscale, but the J chairs have not been modelled before, as have the 2 bolt bridge chairs and the reinforced fishplates
  8. Hi Dave. This google search shows a number of pictures of Barry Slips, both real and model. With the exception of the photo of someone whose name happens to be Barry Slip, most of them are either here on RM Web or on Martyn Wynn's Templot site. I have been on the Missenden Modellers Weekends for both Track Building and Templot and I have produced a template for one of these formations in both Templot and Trax. All I need now is for the rest of my life to subside so I can sit down and make one up... Cheers Elliott
  9. When in danger or in doubt, get the model railway out. The fourth layout in the Farthing series is taking shape, a welcome relief from the lockdown blues. Above is a reminder of the trackplan. So complicated that it broke Templot. Only very advanced modellers can do that. A test piece to see what the new Peco Bullhead track is all about. I decided to give Peco a go as a change from handbuilt track. The chairs are wrong for GWR, will be interesting to see how much I notice it. One advantage of the new Peco track is that it’s voice controlled. You simply tell it where to go and it will lay itself. The layout will be operated as a micro on a daily basis, but I may add a further module for extended operation, or even a direct link to my "Old Yard" layout. The rear siding therefore extends to the baseboard edge, and is protected by a removeable buffer stop, knocked together from balsa in the stopgap style of the old N&SJR. The other stops are standard GWR, built from the Lanarkshire Models kit. In order to fit them on the Peco track, I had to carve off most of the chairs. Have others found a better solution? For replacement, I dug into my stash of C+L GWR chairs. Ironic, as I now have proper GWR chairs next to the Peco ones. Maybe I should slice up some Peco chairs and fit them instead. What a cruel close-up by the way, I need to get out the filler. I wanted some sort of 'inset' track for the front siding. Photos suggest that while proper inset track was certainly used in some GWR yards, more pragmatic solutions were preferred when feasible. This includes leaving the four foot unpaved, as seen in the bottom three photos here (all heavily cropped). That seems to have been a favoured solution where cartage vehicles needed firm ground to off-load or pass alongside the rails, but didn’t have to cross them. I haven’t seen this modelled much, so gave it a go. The outer sections of the sleepers were cut off to avoid the chairs fouling the paving. At this point I was seriously wondering why I hadn’t just made my own track! Here, DAS is being applied to the four foot. The rail was raised slightly above the edging stones to allow for track cleaning. Partly modeller's license, but also in compliance with one or two prototype photos. While not as elegant as proper inset track, I like how it creates a visual break in the setts. The setts were made using old paintbrush heads, fashioned to shape. The material is Forex, a.k.a. ’foamed PVC’ but apparently now without the PVC. The technique also works in DAS clay. The photo is a bit misleading as I used a ruler while pressing the setts, in order to ensure straight lines. A scriber was used to individualise a few setts and sort out mistakes. The material can be curved slightly if necessary. The method has pros and cons. You tend to get a fairly uniform look and it’s hard to avoid the occasional gap between the grooves when pressing down the brush heads. But with practice I found it speedy and tidy, and I like that it can be done away from the layout – especially as I have to work in our living room. Drainage channels were made by drawing a screwdriver tip along a ruler… …then pressing in setts as appropriate. This drainage channel was done differently, by simply pressing the setts deeper than the surrounding ones. The ground in front of standard GWR stable blocks was often paved with either cement or bricks. I went for red bricks, forgetting that one drawing I have says blue engineering bricks (better quality). I may repaint them, but then again I may not. For the entry to the goods depot, I used a Green Scene roller on blue foam as described in my workbench thread. The arched setts are a nod to the yard at Birmingham Moor Street. The Pooley & Sons weighbridge is a Scalelink etch. The weighbridge office is a temporary mock-up. The flagstone pavement was done using the same Forex material as the setts, with the kerbs and flagstones lined out in pencil and then scribed. My original plan was that the road the front would be laid with setts, but after encountering this thread I began to examine photos and realized that 1900s urban roads were very often laid with various forms of non-tarred macadam or similar. Here is Worthing South Street, captioned ca. 1900-1920. Even some parts of central London had streets like this. Sometimes such roads had gutters paved with stone, at other times setts were used or there was no gutter at all. Copyright Getty Images, embedding permitted. Call me a romantic but I like the dry, light and almost ethereal appearance that such roads exhibit in certain summertime photos of the period. I used sanding paper, painted with Vallejo light sand and ivory. It still needs some weathering and a good smattering of horse dung! For the GWR spearhead fencing, the initial plan was to use an old Scalelink etch - but it's rather fragile for a position at the front of the layout. So I used the Ratio GWR fencing. Photos suggest that the verticals should extend to the ground, beneath the lower horizontal bar. Never mind. The fencing sometimes had supports, may add those in due course. I wanted the fencing to be detachable, to allow for close-up photos and easy replacement if I break something. So far it rests in a groove lined with blue tack. If that proves a botch too far, I could try micro magnets. Some stations - e.g. Minehead – had a lovely display of enamel signs mounted on the spearhead fencing. I used those from Tiny Signs, cut with a scalpel, varnished twice and edged with a brown marker (in that order, otherwise the marker may discolour the sign). The signs act as view blocks, and also help draw in the eye to what will become a staff entrance. Here’s Charlie the horse admiring the adverts. He looks a bit out of focus. It must be the provender. In his opinion, the GWR always did mix in too much bran. Work to be done includes a scratchbuild of a GWR weighbridge office (the mock-up seen here is the old Smiths kit), and one or two other structures. The elevated rear section of the layout is a whole little project in itself, I'm hoping it will add further depth to the scene. Lastly, an overview shot. It’s all wired up, but I can’t operate it without a traverser. So that’s next.
  10. RichardS

    Track Planning

    I can happily report that the brass dowels work quite well and all the scenic boards aligned first time. Dowels in place and before boards bolted together Furthermore, by a coincidence or was it some long forgotten element of my plan the height from the floor to the bottom of the scenic boards is 100cm which just happens to be the one of the predetermined heights allowed for by my Aldi adjustable trestles. This is pretty handy as any for the obvious reasons. Happily the bottom of the dropped scenic boards is 1000mm from the floor The scenic boards are dropped and the track bed will be carried on risers this is because the junction sits on a reasonably wide ledge cut into a hillside – the land thus falls away one side and rises on the other. Using an open top design will allow those areas where the land is below the track level to be modelled with greater ‘feel’ for the way land works. Those familiar with the Bodmin and Wadebridge will know that Boscarne Junction is the location where two single lines become one. The two single lines take the traveller to Bodmin (SR) later Bodmin North, and Bodmin (GWR) later Bodmin General. The latter is now the HQ of the Bodmin and Wenford Heritage Railway. The single line to Bodmin North in fact also branched just after Boscarne Junction at Dunmere Junction whence the famous Wenford Bridge goods line made its way along the Camel Valley to the foot of Bodmin moor. The single line made up form the two Bodmin branches went of course to Wadebridge where it joined the North Cornwall Railway and ultimately Padstow where the famous Atlantic Coast Express terminated. Bosmelin is of course Boscarne Junction and the track plan is pretty simple. It comprises 4 parallel lines. Each of the contributing companies had a running line separated by an exchange siding, while the fourth line was a loop siding added to accommodate greater volumes of China Clay traffic and used by the SR and BR(S). In total there are only 7 points/turnouts. Having pondered upon the merits and challenges of using OO-SF, EM and P4 standards I have decided to use PECO’s new 4mm Bullhead OO track chiefly because I just don’t feel I have the time to make a layout this size with finer track – not to mention the cost of re-wheeling all the stock. But this is not to say that the layout will be OO in mentality. I favour the finer scale approach to modelling and thus everything – except the track gauge and wheel flanges – will be (to the best of my ability) modelled with the fine scale ethos in mind. Thus the track plan was conceived and planned as if it were to be P4 and indeed is based upon a Templot plan based upon a 25″ Ordnance Survey Map of 1907 (I think). It follows therefore, that should eventually I decide that ‘broad gauge’ is achievable I can simply substitute the track. I say ‘simply’ but by using the PECO track the actual turnouts are a different geometry so I have had to adjust the plan slightly to accommodate these. No curves anywhere are intended to be less than 915mm radius (thats 36″) but having said that in one or two place a very slight tightening has been needed but we taking a few mm only which is really insignificant. Couplings will be a mixture of 3 link and an auto coupler of some sort where wagons need to be separated. Most stock will remain in rakes and you cannot beat 3 links/screw/instanter for realism when running. Which auto coupler I shall use, I am not sure yet. Possibly, S&W but I also want to investigate Dinghams. It won’t be Jackson. They might be almost invisible but, couplings are not invisible in reality and they’re a bit fragile and need regular maintenance. Any way the track bed is next. I’ll leave you with a track plan drawn up in the free version of Anyrail. Bosmelin – Track Plan – Anyrail. PECO OO Bullhead track
  11. RichardS

    Track Planning

    I can happily report that the brass dowels work quite well and all the scenic boards aligned first time. Dowels in place and before boards bolted together Furthermore, by a coincidence or was it some long forgotten element of my plan the height from the floor to the bottom of the scenic boards is 100cm which just happens to be the one of the predetermined heights allowed for by my Aldi adjustable trestles. This is pretty handy as any for the obvious reasons. Happily the bottom of the dropped scenic boards is 1000mm from the floor The scenic boards are dropped and the track bed will be carried on risers this is because the junction sits on a reasonably wide ledge cut into a hillside – the land thus falls away one side and rises on the other. Using an open top design will allow those areas where the land is below the track level to be modelled with greater ‘feel’ for the way land works. Those familiar with the Bodmin and Wadebridge will know that Boscarne Junction is the location where two single lines become one. The two single lines take the traveller to Bodmin (SR) later Bodmin North, and Bodmin (GWR) later Bodmin General. The latter is now the HQ of the Bodmin and Wenford Heritage Railway. The single line to Bodmin North in fact also branched just after Boscarne Junction at Dunmere Junction whence the famous Wenford Bridge goods line made its way along the Camel Valley to the foot of Bodmin moor. The single line made up form the two Bodmin branches went of course to Wadebridge where it joined the North Cornwall Railway and ultimately Padstow where the famous Atlantic Coast Express terminated. Bosmelin is of course Boscarne Junction and the track plan is pretty simple. It comprises 4 parallel lines. Each of the contributing companies had a running line separated by an exchange siding, while the fourth line was a loop siding added to accommodate greater volumes of China Clay traffic and used by the SR and BR(S). In total there are only 7 points/turnouts. Having pondered upon the merits and challenges of using OO-SF, EM and P4 standards I have decided to use PECO’s new 4mm Bullhead OO track chiefly because I just don’t feel I have the time to make a layout this size with finer track – not to mention the cost of re-wheeling all the stock. But this is not to say that the layout will be OO in mentality. I favour the finer scale approach to modelling and thus everything – except the track gauge and wheel flanges – will be (to the best of my ability) modelled with the fine scale ethos in mind. Thus the track plan was conceived and planned as if it were to be P4 and indeed is based upon a Templot plan based upon a 25″ Ordnance Survey Map of 1907 (I think). It follows therefore, that should eventually I decide that ‘broad gauge’ is achievable I can simply substitute the track. I say ‘simply’ but by using the PECO track the actual turnouts are a different geometry so I have had to adjust the plan slightly to accommodate these. No curves anywhere are intended to be less than 915mm radius (thats 36″) but having said that in one or two place a very slight tightening has been needed but we taking a few mm only which is really insignificant. Couplings will be a mixture of 3 link and an auto coupler of some sort where wagons need to be separated. Most stock will remain in rakes and you cannot beat 3 links/screw/instanter for realism when running. Which auto coupler I shall use, I am not sure yet. Possibly, S&W but I also want to investigate Dinghams. It won’t be Jackson. They might be almost invisible but, couplings are not invisible in reality and they’re a bit fragile and need regular maintenance. Any way the track bed is next. I’ll leave you with a track plan drawn up in the free version of Anyrail. Bosmelin – Track Plan – Anyrail. PECO OO Bullhead track View the full article
  12. RichardS

    Planning.

    When building a ‘model railway in the landscape’ the planning process is comprised, essentially, of three elements which are all inter dependent. Make an alteration to one and this will impact the other two. The three elements are the baseboards which must support the track and give a foundation to the landscape The track plan which must nestle in the landscape and look as though it was an integral part and lastly the landscape itself, the landforms, rivers, woodlands, embankments etc. All three elements must be juggled and adjusted to arrive at an acceptable compromise – for all model railways are a compromise at the end of the day. I’ve been juggling with Bosmelin for a long time, too long in fact, and eventually a stake must be hammered in the ground or in our hobby a saw applied to piece of wood. And so I find myself at the point of commencing the construction of the main scenic boards for Bosmelin. My Templot plan has been ready for a while and is as close a match to Boscarne Junction as can be achieved based on the 1907 25″ OS map. Of course it is rare to be able to adopt a real location without some adaption. For Bosmelin the overall length of the junction to 4mm scale has been cut by about 300mm and the alignment of the diverging branches to Bodmin SR and Bodmin WR will need to be changed but by and large the actual model track layout will be pretty close to the real thing. The problem will be the points, turnouts or if you prefer crossings and switches. The use of Peco ready to lay point-work produces a fixed and rather ‘straight’ geometry. Whereas the plan requires a bespoke set of switches to maintain the integrity of the subtle curves in the layout. So it seems that I shall have to construct the point-work. I have made a point before and it’s not to difficult provided you take your time, don’t rush, use quality gauges and follow instructions or guidelines. The point-work will be built to 4SF or OOSF standards which means that the track guage through the crossing will be 16.2mm and the flange way will be 1mm. This is of course the EM Society standard with the gauge reduced to 16.2mm which is designed to give better running through the crossings as the wheel is supported at all times. Standard RTR stock will run through. the crossings provided the back to back measurements are refined to not less than 14.3mm. Effectively what is being done is to remove ‘OO slop.’ Elsewhere the track guage will be 16.5mm. More details about 4SF can be found online at http://www.4sf.uk To finish here’s a couple of snaps of a baseboard under construction and the templot plan.
  13. RichardS

    Planning.

    When building a ‘model railway in the landscape’ the planning process is comprised, essentially, of three elements which are all inter dependent. Make an alteration to one and this will impact the other two. The three elements are the baseboards which must support the track and give a foundation to the landscape The track plan which must nestle in the landscape and look as though it was an integral part and lastly the landscape itself, the landforms, rivers, woodlands, embankments etc. All three elements must be juggled and adjusted to arrive at an acceptable compromise – for all model railways are a compromise at the end of the day. I’ve been juggling with Bosmelin for a long time, too long in fact, and eventually a stake must be hammered in the ground or in our hobby a saw applied to piece of wood. And so I find myself at the point of commencing the construction of the main scenic boards for Bosmelin. My Templot plan has been ready for a while and is as close a match to Boscarne Junction as can be achieved based on the 1907 25″ OS map. Of course it is rare to be able to adopt a real location without some adaption. For Bosmelin the overall length of the junction to 4mm scale has been cut by about 300mm and the alignment of the diverging branches to Bodmin SR and Bodmin WR will need to be changed but by and large the actual model track layout will be pretty close to the real thing. The problem will be the points, turnouts or if you prefer crossings and switches. The use of Peco ready to lay point-work produces a fixed and rather ‘straight’ geometry. Whereas the plan requires a bespoke set of switches to maintain the integrity of the subtle curves in the layout. So it seems that I shall have to construct the point-work. I have made a point before and it’s not to difficult provided you take your time, don’t rush, use quality gauges and follow instructions or guidelines. The point-work will be built to 4SF or OOSF standards which means that the track guage through the crossing will be 16.2mm and the flange way will be 1mm. This is of course the EM Society standard with the gauge reduced to 16.2mm which is designed to give better running through the crossings as the wheel is supported at all times. Standard RTR stock will run through. the crossings provided the back to back measurements are refined to not less than 14.3mm. Effectively what is being done is to remove ‘OO slop.’ Elsewhere the track guage will be 16.5mm. More details about 4SF can be found online at http://www.4sf.uk To finish here’s a couple of snaps of a baseboard under construction and the templot plan. View the full article
  14. Gordon Thanks, looks like a goo idea, one of the issues is the paper holder in my cheap HP printer, if the guide is narrowed it prints off centre, plus one (long) border is nearly 1" wide. However cutting with a straight edge and scalpel is easy enough its just lining up the sheets on 2 axis I have issues with Plans which go on boards I use as rough guides, for building turnouts, crossings and formations I build them off board and take extra care when attaching pages together When building I try and keep formations as small as I can. Its also easy to rearrange the pages within Templot to minimise the number of pages required for each formation. I also try where possible not to have page joins through crossings on the build templates etc
  15. Gordon I use a scalpel knife to trim the sheets, I do find it a bit hard keeping all the pages square though. The main platform bays will form the datum line, along with the roads to Wrenford and Bodmin Parkway lines. From these everything else will flow according to things like structures and baseboard joints. I did think about swapping the crossover into the goods yard with the turnout into the engine shed, however not only keeping it truer to the subject it is based on, it will also add additional operational interest for instance engine shed to workshop 4 moves rather than two. I am also considering adding one or two extra sidings in the goodsyard/workshop area, but will depend on how they look in relation to the existing track and buildings As for my track building skills, thanks but its more down to the skills of Martin Wynne designing Templot and Len Newman and his skills in product design with C&L and Exactoscale. Not forgetting all the knowledge and help I have gleaned form members here, on Templot Club and demonstrators at shows.
  16. Some trackwork finally! The handbuilt turnout section has been wired and fixed down along with the conveyor pit and associated road. Last night I got the tortuous looping curve section bonded down and started to look at the Peco Y that joins up to the boxfile. Slight deviation from the Templot plan for the curve as I had to straighten out the turnout exit to allow the Farish 0-6-0 chassis to run through. The road through the conveyor pit was always just a temporary placeholder as when I did the plan I had no real idea how the conveyor was going to sit As you can see, the Y is wired but not fixed down yet. I have modified both Y's removing the overcentre spring and adding a frog feed wire as relying on blade contact to power the frog as designed was not going to be reliable enough for me. The frog for the fixed crossing where the NG leaves the complex leading up to the Y will also be switched by the Y motor. So once the route is set from Y through to dual gauge section all will be good. For the Standard gauge track that leads onto the boxfile the Y will have to be reversed. This may change as I'm closely following developments at MERG where a new frog juicer design is evolving. If this is suitable I'll try it for the fixed crossing. Track is stuck down with runny Loctite Superglue, cured with Deluxe Materials Rocket Blaster cyano accelerator. Pin track in place, which is easy with 6mm of foam core underneath, flow the cyano around the sleepers, allowing it to flow underneath, then a quick zap with the Blaster, job done Getting closer to the point where the boxfile gets permanently stuck in position ......
  17. Just spent an hour playing with a few ideas in Templot Both exit routes have sidings as per the older track plan, but added the loco works (top middle) as it is now
  18. As you sat, thanks to the skill of Martin Wynne using Templot now has become very easy for most things, and as it happens Bodmin fits into the space I have providing only one exit is used. As for the station building it will be a very basic form of kit bash- owing to my limited imagination and building skills, Still with what has been used as my DIY workbench freeing up its been a welcome relief to start it. The good thing is the delay has altered my mind to build it to EM gauge rather than 00SF
  19. For once a major step forward, Thursday I visited the timber yard and got a sheet of 9 mm ply stripped down. Only one error in getting too many of the 3" strips cut in half, thankfully a had an offcut at home which I could cut 2 strips from. Thursday was a preparation day and made one board yesterday and the second today A full length view station area top left, entrance to the engine shed bottom left and goods yard bottom right. The Templot plan is a bit of a mess, its an old one which is a bit angular and was designed for 00SF gauge, I converted it to EM, but as I am going to alter it slightly I did not bother realigning the turnouts and plain track, as they will be altered Last night I roughly scaled up the North London Groups Bodmin plan which is on the internet, I am not going to build a scale model of Bodmin station, but kitbash a couple of Wills Station buildings, just wanted an idea of the station area building sizes and platform length and width, my trailing crossover is roughly in place. As said before I will be using a bit of modellers licence, it will have a second platform, a goods shed will remain, possibly a third siding at the station end. A single road engine shed. As for the loco works I will do something not quite certain yet Two more boards to be built, the next 4' board will have the engine shed and works, A 4 th board will be L shaped 2' x 3' will have both curved exit routes (the bridges will form a natural break) and a short 5th board will hold a fiddle yard Cassettes? Still a good step forward and will allow me to more focused
  20. bcnPete

    Back to my roots...

    Afternoon all, Following the recent post and demise of my Meeth 2mmFS DJLC entry I promised to share my alternative proposal. Part of the decline of Meeth was that it had no real layout future beyond the competition - more time should have been spent thinking this through long game One idea I have previously toyed with in BCN, even in 7mm scale was a model of Treviscoe clay dries. The thing that killed off the 7mm one was the thought that I would want to purchase a class 37....so 7mm toe dipping on a budget was never going to happen Despite my excursion into Scottish railways (which I have thoroughly enjoyed) my real interest has always been in China clay so this seemed the natural choice (admittedly Meeth was also a China clay proposal) I have always been taken by the John Vaughan image of a class 37 edging past a dries building so it was time to revisit this but in 2mmFS. I was aware of a rather nice 4mm layout on the forum loosely based on the Trethosa/Treviscoe dries area so it was natural that I first message Kevin to see if he had any objections to my project. I outlined to Kevin that whilst his layout was inspired by the area my would be an extract of the prototype as per my usual preference albeit condensed as required to try and capture the flavour - I sent my track plan and Kevin graciously replied that he had no issues with it especially as mine was based on the prototype and was a different scale - he has even offered some photographic research help - top bloke So the idea is to create an extract of the area between the two sheds which are connected by a high level conveyer of some sort. The 600mm x 234mm (approx.) 2020 DJLC competition area was overlaid on a google earth type snapshot and the area to be modelled was drawn over crudely in CAD - no Templot this end am afraid... Outline sketch...plan and very very very loose elevation (for Mikkel)... Crude CAD drawing...plan and elevation of fascia... Ditto but with overlay on google earth type image... This gave the following scenario which would have a FY each side. The idea is that trains can arrive, shunt wagons into the dries building and collect later on. Perhaps the odd passing freight too on the front line. The era would start early eighties so clay holds but could expand to include CDA’s and also Cargowagons (As found during Internet searches) I have a rake bought for a Moorswater and Mark (46444) weathered one superbly...and has offered to complete the rake. The next part of the process for me was to make a 1:1 mock up to test the idea with rolling stock. This would help gauge train lengths etc. The area was printed out at work full size and foamboard of varying thicknesses cut in preparation. This time I have decided to increase the front viewing window from my usual 200mm to 250mm...the jury is still out on this. The dries buildings have been guesstimated from pictures but I need to do more detailed drawings before they are built. The lighting has been integrated in the fascia with my usual methods and is a return to the IKEA strip lights I used in BCN. Am still pondering the Fiddle Yards but may use sliding perspex as per Kyle...how much of this will be on view is still being considered. Here is the mock up made last weekend and posed with various rolling stock to help me decide whether it’s worth pursuing. The main idea is to try and build it for May 2020 however (a) if it does not get finished it might be presented as a work in progress (b) it has a life beyond the competition in that it could be offered as an alternative to Kyle which will no doubt start to retract from exhibitions in the distant future. View from RH Fiddleyard... View from LH Fiddleyard... 37 arrives in loop on CDA’s... Front end view...not sure whether to reduce down viewing portal... Wagons left for loading and departing... 37 on Cargowaggons...this one was expertly weathered by Mark (46444)... Passing through with Cargowagons...that yellow is ouch! The two circular structures will be the China clay vats (name escapes me!) This link to the Flickr photo sums up the area to be modelled quite nicely...but modern day...(not sure if image shows as I just added the link to it...Mods - I can delete if it’s a problem?) That’s where I am at with it. I am quite happy to return to a China clay layout as I have most of the stock from my Coombe Junction - Moorswater layout. I am off work this week for 1/2 term so may look to make some initial progress. As always, comments welcome! Pete
  21. I have finally started the trackwork, at Scaleforum I bought a bag of part used Exactoscale turnout timbers, which equated to the best part of 3 complete frets, I have in my cupboard a box of PSM code 75 NS rail and a few bags of C&L 2 bolt chairs. I also bought a pack of C&L baseboard alignment dowels and time has come to start building the layout. In addition I have a 2 meter pack of Exactoscale EM fast track bases First up will be the platform trailing crossover. Temporarily I will fit it on a length of 9 mm ply to give me a test track for some locos I am both building and converting to EM gauge, I will also use it to test platform heights and distances I made a plan in Templot with 10' track centres as there will be a row of water stand pipes between the platform road and the run around track. Still a few chairs to be added. Tiebars initially will be copperclad timbers for testing, also bonding wires will need fitting A very untidy work bench and a close up of the crossing I have used 2 bolt chairs on the crossover though the Exactoscale fast track bases have 3 bolt chairs. I will see how noticeable they are on the test plank I will go and get the birch ply tops and ends cut to size in a week or so.
  22. OK, first draft of the pointwork etc is done, some fettling to do but it's removed from the build board and had a quick clean. Isolation gaps next and some wiring then I can test the running with a real loco or two! I'm also thinking about making the narrow gauge track move to the centre of the standard gauge, without sharing a rail etc towards the fiddle yard exit, then I can make dual gauge cassettes that can be rotated easily. Fire up Templot again!
  23. Slow progress but getting there. Some changes from the Templot plan to reality but pretty close. It all looks a dog's breakfast at the moment as heat from the soldering and all that flux has made a mess of the tape etc holding the sleepers down. I'm sure it will all clean up and once painted will be okay
  24. Dry run and it's changed now thanks to a few on the Templot forum. it's now looking like this as you can see I've made a start
  25. Good luck with the project, dual gauge trackwork is something I would like to have a go at, but too many other interests. Been trying to follow the Templot design thread topic and am looking forward to see the progress
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