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Can you convert a ceiling light to a plug in light?


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  • RMweb Gold

Simply put, can you buy a strip light designed to be wired into the ceiling and bung the wires into a plug instead and then use it as a plug-in light?

 

 

To put it simply, if you don't know the answer to your own question, then you need to find somebody who can answer your question to do what you want.

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How are most exhibition layouts lit...? (quite badly, perhaps...?)

 

It should be OK just as long as you use a suitable fuse, and be aware that certain parts within the fitting get hot. Most designs of strip light have raised bumps to allow for a slight air gap between the light and surface they have been fitted to.

 

It is even possible to mount the innards in a box on the floor and just susped the tube above the layout, but that isn't something i'd recommend unless you know what you're doing.

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  • RMweb Gold

You must take wear and tear on the cable into account. Most fittings that screw to a wall or ceiling don't cater for a flexible cable connection, and there is a very real danger that you will cut through the supply cable once you start moving the fitting about.

 

There are many and varied types of inspection and worklight available, so I would strongly recommend that you buy something that is fit for purpose.

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  • RMweb Gold

When we take Dagworth out on the road we have a pair of 4ft flourescent fittings that travel with us. The cables on them are glanded where they enter the fittings, and are long lengths of PVC 3 core 1.5mm flex. The fuse is a 5 amp fuse.

There's no reason why it can't be done, but if you are as unsure as to need to ask on here then I really would seek the advice of someone who knows what they are doing to do the wiring for you.

 

Andi

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  • RMweb Gold

The power supply from a ceiling light is more than enough to power a florescent light. It is, after all, a light fitting. You would need to make sure it was earthed though. The average light socket does not have an earth.

 

Any ceiling rose will have an earth, and all flourescent fittings will be earthed in normal installations.

 

Andi

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Okay, thanks folks. I'm confident with my own wiring abilities, I just wanted to make sure I wasn't missing something really obvious. I couldn't see any reason why not, but useful to check. Thanks again.

 

 

To put it simply, if you don't know the answer to your own question, then you need to find somebody who can answer your question to do what you want.

 

I really don't understand that reply, but thanks anyway!

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The reason for saying if you need to ask the question find someone who knows - is that you may not understand the answer and possibly endanger yourself.

If you want a light that can be fixed say to a layout and plugged in a normal ceiling light would be fine. Hower if you want an inspection light on a wander lead I suggest one designed for that purpose would be better.

Donw

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I have to say that I agree with people on here that are saying, "If you have to ask, find someone to do it for you".

 

Make a mistake with 12V, you will normally get away with it, minimum damage.

Make a mistake with 230V, and either you, or someone else, could lose their life, or you could burn the house down.

 

Not worth the risk. IMHO

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On leaving school I served my apprenticeship as an electrician, though it's been many years since I earned my wage as one. I can only reiterate the advice that if you need to ask then you're probably not competent to do. I've seen lots of horrors perpetrated by those that believe they have some competence; the problem being that they haven't realised where their own limitations lie or that there are gaps in their knowledge which can lead them to conclude that they've done a good safe job when that's not the case. To put it in context most people think that they can put a plug on a flex, but I've seen as many dodgy jobs as good ones and there's a good reason why the moulded on plug is now the industry standard.

 

Sorry if this sounds dismissive or harsh but safety is paramount.

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Fair enough. You are correct in that I want some lighting for my layout, so I'm looking at something like this...

 

http://www.homebase....ting%7C16849318

 

...and thinking 'Okay, I've wired these and similar into a ceiling many times before, but that's not an option for layout lighting, I want to just plug it into a wall socket, so can you get some flex and a plug and do exactly that if you don't bodge it?'. I couldn't see any reason why not, but just wanted to check with others... hence my confusion over replies that said 'Well you need to ask someone', because that appeared to me to be exactly what I was doing! biggrin.gif

 

 

I appreciate the warnings about not mucking about with electricity though - very wise.

 

 

However, I'm not really sure where we're at now. Some people suggesting it's fine and no worries at all, others saying don't touch it with a barge pole sad.gif

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I'm with edwin as I've used the under cupboard lights for lighting my layout in the loft, and they are all connected using the plug and leads that came with them. An added bonus is that most are low wattage and save money in running costs, mine replaced two 65w lights 130w total the new strip lights 4*11w 44w a third of the power and therefore cost of running. The light from 4 smaller ones over the layout give less shaddows and similar or better colour balence on the layout. They are connected to a plug into a switched socket from a fusebox, the strip lights have a 3a fuse in the plug, plus a 5a in the box.

 

Also they are all plastic and have not hot spots.

 

regards

 

mike g

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I have a 5ft flourecent that I have wired to plug into a standard socket. It has a gromet fitted where the cable comes out and there is no access to the insides without unscrewing and removing the covers.

 

This fitting is secured to the wall by sliding over two screws, so I can move it from one side of my loft to another if required.

 

I also have in my loft two fixed standard light fittings screwed up onto the ceiling, that instead of being wired into the light circuit each have a plug on the end and are plugged into my extension cable.

 

Think it depends on the type of fitting and what you intend to do with it.

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You can certainly do what you want, a lighting fitting used on an extension lead to an earthed plug, but, and it's a big but, once the home produced portable light is up and running it really can only be used at home under your supervision.

 

If used at an exhibition, the tester may ban it, as it has no type approval or certification for the portable use.

 

This does not mean it's un-safe, just not provably safe.

 

For Exhibitions use Approved portable lights and Cable.

 

For Home use it is up to you within reasonable practices., do not forget the insurance implications etc. As with all electricity, any doubt, ask an expert!

 

Stephen.

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Hello,

Reference has been made to the electrical hazards posed by the wiring etc, but no mention has been made to the substantial hazard posed by the chemicals inside the fluorescent tube should breakage occur.

http://www.http.com//nemesis.lonestar.org/reference/electricity/fluorescent/safety.html

I seem to have encountered problems inserting the link which is as above.

trustytrev. :)

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