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M Graff

FSM Two stall engine house build

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Hi all.

I started on a new build the other day.

A FSM kit: The two stall engine house.

It is a very nice kit with one big setback: the windows...... I made my own with slide covers.

This is how it looks now after a few days work:

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The windows were made with a technical pen on slide covers that I had cut with a diamond tip scriber..

I made a template for the mullions.

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Any ideas on the interior? I would like to make this building with lights and full interior.

Edited by M Graff
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I looked at some other engine house builds and got really inspired so I got busy right away.

The kit had some rather nice castings which I added to with some from the scrap box.

 

:D

 

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It is a bit fiddly to paint the small details, but with good light it works alright.

 

 

 

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I think it is getting there.

 

Thanks for watching.

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Well now, this seems to be a dead end part of RMWEB...

;-)

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Well now, this seems to be a dead end part of RMWEB...

;-)

 

No, but it's a quiet corner of RMWeb.

 

That said, i am curious about your stone technique.  It appears from the picture that you have glued actual stones/pebbles to the wall and used a mortar/mortar like material to cover them for the foundation walls.  I'd be interested in hearing/seeing more about what you did there.

 

Stephen

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Just very quiet, I think Mike - I was looking for an HO scale toilet for my upcoming Diner build- have you any idea where yours came from?

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No, but it's a quiet corner of RMWeb.

 

That said, i am curious about your stone technique.  It appears from the picture that you have glued actual stones/pebbles to the wall and used a mortar/mortar like material to cover them for the foundation walls.  I'd be interested in hearing/seeing more about what you did there.

 

Stephen

Well, it is just stones glued to the wall with white glue.

I then use tile grout to mortar it.

After the grout has hardened I use a brass bristle brush and a glass fibre brush to reveal the stone surfaces.

It is a very easy method.

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Mike

 

As pointed out, not dead, just quiet. I've noticed this before, where people are far more interested in interior detailing a coach or wagon rather than interiors of buildings. Your efforts are excellent, but do realise that lack of comments is not necessarily lack of interest, so please don't get disheartened - this thread and photos are well worth looking at. I'd like a lot of the detailed components in N scale, but your HO gauge details are making me green with envy. What will heighten interest are those Noch-ing off components. Look at the number of views, not necessarily responses.

 

Dennis

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Well, it is just stones glued to the wall with white glue.

I then use tile grout to mortar it.

After the grout has hardened I use a brass bristle brush and a glass fibre brush to reveal the stone surfaces.

It is a very easy method.

 

And an effective looking one, thanks, I'll have to remember that for if i ever want to build a field stone or similar looking foundation or fence.

 

Cheers

Stephen

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And an effective looking one, thanks, I'll have to remember that for if i ever want to build a field stone or similar looking foundation or fence.

 

Cheers

 

Stephen

Always nice to share new techniques.
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I am not normally a big fan of FSM kits as they always look too busy if built as depicted in the adverts, Bar Mills fall into the same trap and end up as caricatures. Here I think you have struck an excellent line between detail and fussiness, good rendition of an engine house that has work to do but doesn't look like somebody dumped parts and tools all over the place or never swept the floor in years.

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