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22 hours ago, Ian Smith said:

Over the last couple of weeks, I've been adding the finishing touches to my Buffalo Saddle Tank.  It's not quite there yet as I've still got to add the brakes and sand pipes to the chassis but superficially its all done.

 A few shots of her posed on Modbury's embankment section :

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_07/IMG_3552.JPG.af0217e76294d5e9ae17b0715e8594f6.JPG

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_07/IMG_3554.JPG.f4abf1c3168cafb60d40a518b1c212df.JPG

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_07/IMG_3555.JPG.7cd545578165e6e8d4706b8899e4cd00.JPG

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_07/IMG_3556.JPG.f0635ae9f22c0f920dbf9d359f34d6f6.JPG

 

The lining is Fox transfers except the rather poorer curved bits around the cab cut outs - they being hand painted with a fine brush because none of the curvy bits of transfer seemed to match the cut outs.  On the model it doesn't look too bad but seeing it blown up on a computer screen some 3 times the size of the model, I'll let you decide how successful I've been!

 

The ejectors under the saddle just forward of the cab were soldered up from bits of brass wire and tube, and are a representation of the early type - they seemed to get ever more complex as time went on.  The number plates are from my first attempt at drawing up artwork for etching, and were etched in 0.006" brass.

 

Looking at the last photo in particular, it looks like I need to loosen the bolt securing the safety valve cover and rotate it through 90 degrees.

 

Ian

I wish my 4mom one looked as good!

DrDuncan

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Lovely layout, don't know how you do it!  I once had an N layout but it was too small for me.  Gave it up for O!

         Brian.

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Over the last couple of weeks I've been trying to put together a few more wagons in readiness for Modbury's outing to the Warley MRC exhibition at the NEC in November.  The photos below show the progress - I do have another Cattle Wagon almost finished but I don't seem to have any wheels left to put under it!

 

IMG_3564.JPG.c4b1306eab60e36cf6160a00a5516e7d.JPG

The 6 wagons pretty well complete : Outside Framed Van in 1904 livery, a Foxcote Colliery wagon (in homage to Jerry who (re-)introduced me to 2FS about 7 years ago), a 3 Plank Open in 1904 livery (25" GW don't fit so largest possible used), a 4 Plank Open in 1904 livery (again 25" GW don't fit so largest possible used), Outside Framed Van in pre 1904 red livery, and finally a Large Cattle Wagon also in 1904 livery.

 

IMG_3565.JPG.f8fd99e88d0642083dc6e0f6a5d22ff4.JPG

Outside Framed Van is one of my 3D printed ones in FUD from Shapeways, finished with Association parts for the underframe.  The Foxcote Colliery wagon is an Association kit on an 8'6" underframe.  The lettering is some very old Woodhead transfers for the little lettering, and some waterslide transfers of unknown manufacture for the FOXCOTE.  I hope that Jerry doesn't mind too much that his colliery is delivering its wares down in South Devon.

 

IMG_3566.JPG.0191094cd0d0140c312371d71c2bde66.JPG

The two open wagons are from the Association O3 (5 plank) and O5 (4 plank) wagon kits sitting on Association 9' wheelbase underframes.  The 3 Plank wagon is a much butchered O3 kit - top 2 planks removed along with diagonal strapping, ends narrowed, etc.

 

IMG_3567.JPG.4de4555bf2f04d0333f94c8d4e792b04.JPG

Both these wagons are from 3D printed bodies (from my own artwork) in FUD by Shapeways.  Both still need the lettering completed (LARGE being applied to the ends of the Cattle wagon and L M & S applied to denote the size of the wagon with the partition in place.

 

All of the wagons need a little weight adding and DG couplings fitted, and all will receive further weathering too.

 

Ian

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They look great Ian, I'm sure the directors of the colliery will be delighted that coal from their pit is getting down to south Devon. Somerstecoal was certainly used at Exeter gasworks so perfectly feasable it got to Modbury and beyond.

 

Below is the batch of wagons I did when I rebuilt the colliery from Highbury to Foxcote.

 

Jerry

 

IMG_3434.JPG.e35d666dff7ad3ad3355aa45767772ee.JPG

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19 hours ago, queensquare said:

They look great Ian, I'm sure the directors of the colliery will be delighted that coal from their pit is getting down to south Devon. Somerstecoal was certainly used at Exeter gasworks so perfectly feasable it got to Modbury and beyond.

 

Below is the batch of wagons I did when I rebuilt the colliery from Highbury to Foxcote.

 

Jerry

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_10/IMG_3434.JPG.e35d666dff7ad3ad3355aa45767772ee.JPG

 

Jerry, when I looked at the transfer letters I had to make "FOXCOTE" I thought that the largest I had seemed too small to fill the wagon side, so I elected to add the word "Colliery" afterwards.  Looking at your wagons I think I could have got away with the wider spacing (especially if I'd added shading to the letters).  Oh well, next time :-)  Obviously my number 14 wagon is carrying an earlier version of the livery :rolleyes:

 

Ian

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A great set of photos Ian. I was sorry not to make it it to the NEC.

 

Don

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Superb views, Ian.

 

I studied the coaches in particular, the paintwork really is excellent. The small "GWR" lettering on the Siphon is a nice touch, and helps set the period.

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Modbury has become a really nice atmospheric model and a valuable historical record of some special railway history. I especially like the second photo down taken at a prototypical level. Thanks for sharing Ian. 

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13 hours ago, 2mmKiwi said:

Modbury has become a really nice atmospheric model and a valuable historical record of some special railway history. I especially like the second photo down taken at a prototypical level. Thanks for sharing Ian. 

Steve,

The low down shot is a favourite of mine too. No one ever comments but I think that in that particular shot especially it is difficult to discern what scale the model is.

Ian

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Ian, I agree that a lot of good 2mm scale modelling defies expectations and it is difficult to tell at times. Your exquisite coach painting in particular is an example.

On another note what is your overall philosophy for weathering on Modbury?

 

Steve

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2 hours ago, 2mmKiwi said:

Ian, I agree that a lot of good 2mm scale modelling defies expectations and it is difficult to tell at times. Your exquisite coach painting in particular is an example.

On another note what is your overall philosophy for weathering on Modbury?

 

Steve

Steve,

I tend to apply a little weathering to my wagons - generally overpainting the transfers in a wash of body colour as a minimum. I do want to try weathering the wagons and coach undetframe especially at some point.

 

Coach bodies and locos haven't really been weathered although again I have washed the loco lining with body colour to knock the lining back a bit.

 

Buildings have been mildly weathered with white,brown,black, and yellow ochre pastels (stiff brush used to pick up pigment from sticks of colour and dry brushed on). Again I want to tone things down a bit now I've finished all the buildings - wanted to apply similar weathering consistently across everything rather than weathering each as it was built.

 

Trackwork has again been weathered with pastels, dark areas added where locos would stand and where switches would be greased.

 

Ian

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