Jump to content

Modbury


Ian Smith
 Share

Recommended Posts

Saw the layout today at Uckfield. 

 

Absolutely stunning. Best 2mm effort I have seen - the rolling stock is out of this world. 

Edited by sumo
  • Like 1
  • Agree 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold

Brilliant work on the Horse and cart  I love the sort of nonchalant way you refer to re-sculpting the horse. The drive looks good two. Just a little detail but so well done.

 

Don

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Ian,well we managed to meet at  the Ukfield show and i must say it was truely worth it .Your model diarama what ever you wish to call it was amazing . I still cant think how you can write this blog page and do the amount of really excellent modelling into the time that you have between the models and articles . The Locos are a true art from start to the finished item.Nice to chat to you even it was for a short time considering you were very busy.Look forward to seeing you and Modbury in the future.

Best regards Ray. 

Ps Thanks to your 2mm members helping out at Ukfield over the weekend the show was very good and it now shows that things are returning a little back to normal.

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Compound2632 said:

I too had the pleasure of seeing the layout at Uckfield. I was impressed by how small everything is: from the amount of detail apparent in photos and videos, one might expect it to be 7 mm scale...

Stephen,

It was very nice to meet you at last and put a mask to a name :D

Thank you for the kind comments, I hope you enjoyed Modbury (and Sherton Abbas, Wadebridge, et al).  You are not the first to comment that virtually the stock and layout have a "bigger" presence :lol:

 

Ian

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • RMweb Gold

Excellent views, Ian. I have noticed before that photos from the "wrong" side can be just as good or even better than the normal ones. I wonder if it's because the angles are less "designed" and therefore in fact seem more natural.

 

Anyway, that hose over the rail fence is a nice touch, haven't seen that before. I've enjoyed watching the layout in videos from Uckfield too, sounds like it went well.

 

Edited by Mikkel
Typo
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

On 29/10/2021 at 14:37, Mikkel said:

Excellent views, Ian. I have noticed before that photos from the "wrong" side can be just as good or even better than the normal ones. I wonder if it's because the angles are less "designed" and therefore in fact seem more natural.

 

Anyway, that hose over the rail fence is a nice touch, haven't seen that before. I've enjoyed watching the layout in videos from Uckfield too, sounds like it went well.

 

I quite agree about “non-normal” viewing angles. Some weeks ago I casually thought about turning Modbury around, and adding 6” to what is currently the front of the layout, so that it would be viewed from the yard side - I quickly discarded the thought as madness :D

 

The Uckfield exhibition was very enjoyable, it was really nice to have a degree of normality back, and to see old friends again. Modbury for the most part behaved itself, there was an odd derailment coming onto/off the train table fiddle yards, and the occasional problem with the DG couplings used. All of the locos performed well (including the steam railmotor).

Ian

  • Like 3
  • Agree 1
  • Friendly/supportive 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Ian, I agree it does make your layout look different taking photos from the other side, it shows that you have not skimped on the buildings that you can shown  either way round. Yes as I said at Uckfield I wish I had a liittle more time that Sunday afternoon , we may have a bit more to to have a chinwag about railways and modelling. Best regards Ray.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

I've done very little modelling recently, but have the following photo to share :

948965154_BrickLoads(small).JPG.90373a37cb1d80207ac2e0a6dda1e894.JPG

 

This shows (what hopefully looks like) a couple of brick loads for a pair of my open wagons.  On the real Yealmpton Branch there was a brick works at Steer Point.  My imaginary line through Modbury would have followed the course of that said branch once it reached Yealmpton and hence would also have served the brick works at Steer Point.

 

I have had a mind to produce some brick loads for quite some time but kept putting it off because I couldn't actually find any (clear) photos to illustrate how such a load would have been carried - was it packed with straw?  Were the bricks on some form of pallet? Etc.  Quite by chance, a few weeks ago someone posted a link to a video elsewhere on RMweb (the "Pre-Grouping Wagons in 4mm - the D299 appreciation thread") which showed bricks being loaded into open wagons (https://www.ampthill.tv/playvideo.html?id=94&fbclid=IwAR3eZd3oo2SmzR3lPCLlZFnI0z2UhhIrzBpa1gesRaXH8i5pKFLCL8hqur0) - the loading of wagons starts about 8:40.

 

Although a 1920's film, I felt that the evidence that bricks were just stacked in the wagons was enough to allow me to try to create a couple of representative loads.

 

A piece of 0.020" plasticard was scribed with a grid of bricks (1.5mm x 0.6mm - about 9" x 4"), then that was cut up and layered to provide a bit of "interest" to the loads.  Once dry, I ended up painting the whole lot a brick colour then picking out individual bricks in slightly different shades before filling the scribed grooves with a very thin wash of dark brown track colour to try to "separate" the bricks.

 

I should add that each load has a small patch of 0.020" steel shim glued to the underside so that the loads can be removed easily with a magnet.

 

Ian

Edited by Ian Smith
fixed the video URL (it was just text rather than a link)
  • Like 9
  • Craftsmanship/clever 10
Link to post
Share on other sites

The other thing I noted was the huge variety of different wagons. Even though it is a whole train from a single starting point, wagons seem to come from just about everywhere. Prototypical justification for modellers building an assortment of wagons!

 

Duncan

Link to post
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, DuncanFogg said:

The other thing I noted was the huge variety of different wagons. Even though it is a whole train from a single starting point, wagons seem to come from just about everywhere. Prototypical justification for modellers building an assortment of wagons!

 

This is a natural consequence of the pooling arrangements for ordinary opens and vans introduced during the Great War. In Modbury's time period, any foreign wagon would have been returned promptly to its home system (along with any sheets and ropes), by the same route it had arrived by. So one has to be a little careful. But for the modeller of the inter-war period, you are right, wagons from pretty much any company could be seen anywhere, although of course one should weight towards the largest companies and, to some extent, the home company.

  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Ian Morgan said:

I really liked the pyramid stack of bricks on the low sided wagon.

 

brick_load.jpg.31888768c3fef20286dfedec73856350.jpg

Ian, I too like the pyramid way of loading the single plank wagon, although I think if you did that on a model it would raise a few eyebrows so you might need to keep the “still” from the film handy to satisfy the non-believers :D

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Ian Smith said:

Ian, I too like the pyramid way of loading the single plank wagon, although I think if you did that on a model it would raise a few eyebrows so you might need to keep the “still” from the film handy to satisfy the non-believers :D

 

Over on my wagon-building thread, Simon @Regularity posted a sketch of how the pyramid stacking is done:

Looking again at the still, I think the edging bricks are standing on their ends. An even more labour-intensive way of loading than the hand-stacking seen elsewhere in the film!

 

Another point discussed there was the density of the load and hence how full the wagon can be. (A general consideration not confined to bricks, and which works both ways as the volumetric capacity of the wagon can often be the limiting factor.) Density of brick varies with type; the Fletton bricks are, I think, one of the less dense types. I think Ian's got it right; noting that the depth of the load looks greater in the 10 ton 4-plank wagon than the 8 ton 3-plank.

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold

When an apprentice at 16  (1965) I was with a Pipe Watcher (supervisor of the contractors laying ducts and building joint boxes. More bricks were need and I was sent to assist the lorry driver. We pulled into the yard next to a stack of bricks . One of us would throw 4 bricks at a time for the other to catch and stack. After the first throw when the 4 bricks all managed to hit different parts of the driver I was the catcher. I did have thick gloves on but I suspect H&S would have a fit these days. It didn't take that long to load 500 bricks.

 

One way bricks were judged was by the amount of water they coud absorb. Weigh a brick empty and then drop it in a pail of water and once it had time to absorb the water again re weigh the bricks. 

 

Don

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...