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Interesting Ian, there should be work there for one our two winter's evenings! 

 

What diagrams are the 6-wheelers, I wonder?

 

Mikkel,

 

Hopefully, it will all keep me quiet for a while :-)

 

The 6 wheelers are : V13 (full brake), U28 (1st / 2nd composite with centre luggage compartment and clerestory roof), U21 (1st / 2nd composite with centre luggage compartment) and S6 (All 3rd).

 

 

Ian

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Mikkel,

 

Hopefully, it will all keep me quiet for a while :-)

 

The 6 wheelers are : V13 (full brake), U28 (1st / 2nd composite with centre luggage compartment and clerestory roof), U21 (1st / 2nd composite with centre luggage compartment) and S6 (All 3rd).

 

 

Ian

 

Thanks Ian, that's a very nice selection. I especially look forward to the U28, I wish the GWR had standardized on short clerestories, they are very characterful.

 

If I can ask another question: Looking back through the thread it seems that you are using QCAD for your drawing. Was there any particular reason for choosing this, and are you happy with it?  I'm still quite new to CAD and am using Inkscape, but I'm interested to learn about programs and what they can do.

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Thanks Ian, that's a very nice selection. I especially look forward to the U28, I wish the GWR had standardized on short clerestories, they are very characterful.

 

If I can ask another question: Looking back through the thread it seems that you are using QCAD for your drawing. Was there any particular reason for choosing this, and are you happy with it?  I'm still quite new to CAD and am using Inkscape, but I'm interested to learn about programs and what they can do.

 

Mikkel,

 

Yes I am using QCAD.  I have used Inkscape in the past, indeed the first artwork I did for etching was produced in Inkscape.  I can't remember why I went looking for a "proper" CAD program now, probably because I wanted something that could export a DXF file or something of that ilk.  I discovered QCAD, tried the "demo" version, which seems to be a full version that gets bits of itself turned off after a number of operations - for example the ability to automatically draw parallel lines is prevented after some time using it - not a problem in itself because closing the program down and restarting it re-enables the lost functionality.  However this can only be done for so long before the program decides you've played with the demo version for long enough and ought to part with some cash to buy the full "Pro" version, I cheat by going into the INI file to reset the counter allowing me to use the demo version for ever and a day though :-)

 

In summary, I went to QCAD because I thought I needed to for artwork for etching (file type), in reality I didn't need to because in both instances of doing etch artwork I have supplied PDF files to PPD.  Therefore perhaps I should have stuck with Inkscape as it's meant learning another package, and one that has its own foibles!

 

Hope that is helpful,

Ian 

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Thanks for that Ian, very useful.

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Outstanding modelling Ian, I've taken an interest in this thread because the route you propose would pass very close to my South Devon house (just outside Yealmpton) about 5 miles from Modbury. I'm stunned by those figures you've just painted - I would struggle in 4mm - you must have excellent eyesight and a steady hand.

Neil

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If I can ask another question: Looking back through the thread it seems that you are using QCAD for your drawing. Was there any particular reason for choosing this, and are you happy with it?  I'm still quite new to CAD and am using Inkscape, but I'm interested to learn about programs and what they can do.

 

Tought I might add my two penn'orth. I've also used both CAD and Inkscape to do etch artwork (plus some err... borrowed... artwork from Ian). They both have different 'comfort zones' and pros and cons.

 

When doing loco nameplates Inkscape was very useful - in particular it was brilliant for laying out lettering on a curve and letting me fiddle about with kerning and letter spacing... even after the lettering was laid out on the curve. This is the sort of thing that graphics packages do well but most CAD packages probably don't see it as a problem that they need to solve.

 

On the other hand, doing the concentric curves for the nameplate border and the spacing plate that sits between the nameplate and the splasher was more of a pain in Inkscape - you can do it but you need to think it through carefully and maybe go back several steps if you do something wrong. CAD is brilliant for snapping objects to other objects in useful ways (e.g. concentric things, tangents to circles). It's also stronger when you care about exact dimensions. Inkscape can make objects to specific dimensions but then if you change the line thickness you will find that the dimensions have changed - dimensions are not really the 'comfort zone' for Inkscape.

 

So basically if I was doing something with lots of lettering, or maybe decorative ironwork needing fancy spline curves then I'd prefer Inkscape. If I was doing more engineering type stuff (e.g. a loco, coach or wagon chassis) then I'd go for CAD every time. Either way I'd go with PDF for the final thing that goes to the etchers though.

 

Regards, Andy

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Having a spare hour or two while SWMBO was painting the hall walls, I set to and had a little play with my etchings (so to speak).

 

I chose one of the platform trolleys :

post-12089-0-95278500-1500820760_thumb.jpg

 

I've designed this as a 3 layer etch to build up the deck of the trolley, the top layer is simply the rim around the deck (the wheels have to be removed and saved for later),  the middle layer is the main deck, and the lower layer has fold down rear axle and brake blocks.

 

Each of these layers was tinned where necessary, and the 3 layers folded over and sweated together (having first folded down the rear axle and brake blocks).  The wheels were then attached to the rear axle - I've made the axle hole in the wheels a little generous which meant attaching them was more of a pain than it could have been, I'll probably super-glue the wheels on in future with a gel type glue (this experiment is all soldered construction).

 

The front steering axle and draw-bar-handle were made up next, the axle part has a 90 degree bend to be made to provide the extension to the actual draw-bar-handle, and also has a spigot to locate it in a hole in the lower layer of the deck assembly. Again, I've made the hole to big or the spigot to small so fitting was a little awkward as the part had to be held while the soldered joint was made.  I've also been a little over-generous with the slot in the end of the extension that the draw-bar-handle fits in (although a very gentle squeeze with pliers can get this to be an interference fit).  Again the wheels are a sloppy fit on the axle which is a bit of a nuisance.  However...

 

post-12089-0-78456600-1500820762_thumb.jpg

post-12089-0-36955600-1500820764_thumb.jpg

post-12089-0-08142300-1500820766_thumb.jpg

 

I'm quite pleased with the it, to my eyes it looks like a GWR platform trolley although the wheels look (and are) a little delicate.  I might try laminating a pair of wheels together on the next one to see if it is an improvement (I've included enough on each etch to allow for this or for donating some to the carpet monster).

 

Ian

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....... - I've made the axle hole in the wheels a little generous which meant attaching them was more of a pain than it could have been, I'll probably super-glue the wheels on in future with a gel type glue (this experiment is all soldered construction)............ Again, I've made the hole to big or the spigot to small so fitting was a little awkward as the part had to be held while the soldered joint was made.  I've also been a little over-generous with the slot in the end of the extension that the draw-bar-handle fits in (although a very gentle squeeze with pliers can get this to be an interference fit).  ......

These are the little things you learn when designing etches!  It's not a disaster when you can do a 'work around' on the first etches - I've had worse!  :banghead:

 

Lovely little trolleys!

 

Jim

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Over the last couple of weeks I've finally built and installed the last posted signal on Modbury.  This one is the Up Advanced Starter and Shunt Ahead signal sited on the embankment.  It has been built to my usual recipe : a milled post, a cut-off 4mm handrail knob for the finial ball, and various MSE components for the arms, ladder, balance weights, etc.  In addition, this signal makes use of a custom etch shunt ahead arm and "S", and of course various bits of wire and tube to allow the whole thing to function and look like a signal.

 

Unfortunately, I ended up having to solder the balance weight arms solid on this one (the other signals all have moving balance weight arms) because the two drive rods kept interfering with each other at the balance arm connections - after all the wire (rod) is simply bent through 90 degrees to pass through these rather than a forked joint as per prototype!  So the drive rods on this signal pass straight through the baseboard to the rocking pivot below the board.  This pivot has end stops (it passes into a hole drilled/filed in the U channel below board which limits the throw).  Hopefully this can be seen in the photos below.

 
post-12089-0-69520300-1502375889_thumb.jpg
Up Advanced Starter / Shunt Ahead signal sited on embankment (along with Down Home)
 
post-12089-0-24335700-1502375892_thumb.jpg
Side view to show the ladder, platform and handrails
 
post-12089-0-04788500-1502375894_thumb.jpg
The under-board pivot arrangement - hopefully it's possible to see how the pivot arm movement is being limited by it passing into a hole in the U channel
 
post-12089-0-23674400-1502375896_thumb.jpg
Servo control - a pivot in the servo arm (horn) allows the rotating motion of the servo arm to be transmitted into a linear push/pull motion.  This push pull is applied to the signal pivot via an angle crank, using thin guitar wire to absorb any excess servo throw
 
post-12089-0-48343700-1502375898_thumb.jpg
Another view of same
 
post-12089-0-57354900-1502375900_thumb.jpg
The servo control boards - one for each signal.  The pre-set potentiometers allow easy control of the endpoints of the servo throw and are switched in/out with the relay.
 
I still have to cover the signal base with ballast.
 
Ian
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In addition to the signal described above, I've also been trying to progress the Goods Shed a little more - actually to get the roof complete!  There's still quite a bit still to do - down pipes, sliding doors, and paint the chimney pot (which was added part way through taking these photos).

 

post-12089-0-91153100-1502379775_thumb.jpg

View of Goods Shed in its location

 

post-12089-0-81862100-1502379777_thumb.jpg

Closer view of Goods Shed - The handrail on the steps is simply soldered up from fine wire in a jig

 

post-12089-0-15720400-1502379779_thumb.jpg

View through the station towards Plymouth

 

post-12089-0-50232300-1502379781_thumb.jpg

View through the station towards Plymouth

 

post-12089-0-99103100-1502379783_thumb.jpg

View through the station towards Plymouth

 

post-12089-0-86709100-1502379785_thumb.jpg

A view that the public can't see (hence the backing board held in place to hide the detritus behind the signal box)

 

Thank you for looking

 

Ian

Edited by Ian Smith
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I really like the signals - I found them fiddly enough to do in 4mm! Layout looks great and nice to see something a bit different but still GWR, the overview shot showing it to good effect.

 

All the best

 

Jon

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More excellent work Ian. This has really turned out as something special. It is so atmospheric as I look at the pictures I can hear the sound of birds and the odd noise of rural life followed by the block bells ringing all quiet for a minute then the sounds of the signals being pulled off and you are listening for the sounds of the train approaching. Sheer magic.

 

Don

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Excellent work Ian, particularly liking the signals!

 

Tom.

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This weekend (9th & 10th Sept) Modbury will be at its first public exhibition at the Swindon Steam Festival at the Swindon Steam museum. Also flying the 2FS flag will be Nigel Ashton's Llangerisech and Mick Simpson's Callaton.

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Over the last couple of days I've returned to building another coach.  This one is a GWR diagram U28, a 6 wheel composite with a central luggage compartment, and a clerestory roof.

 

It is one of the set that I drew up the artwork for and had etched by PPD.  So far I have built up the main body and added the clerestory to the roof.  Unfortunately, when I designed the etch I forgot to take account of the fact that I had designed the sides to fit outside the ends which meant that I had made the main roof slightly too narrow (not by very much but enough to not have any over hang along the sides).  To attempt to rectify this fault, I simply soldered two lengths of 0.3mm brass wire along the edges of the roof before I rolled it.

 

The etch started off like this (one of the underframes can also be seen to the right of the photo) :

post-12089-0-77737100-1517605603_thumb.jpg

 

After a few hours I now have (the step end) :

post-12089-0-70270300-1517605620_thumb.jpg

 

and the non-step end :

post-12089-0-65370400-1517605635_thumb.jpg

 

The next stage will be to add the door handles and G scroll handrails (from an N Brass etch), turn up and fit the gas lamp tops (and the gas feed pipe - only one for my period), and the step end handrails.  Then it's on to the underframe...

 

Ian

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Lovely work. Look forward to seeing the U28 finished. Shame you aren’t doing a 4mm too!!!

Duncan

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Nice work Ian. I definitely think you should offer the etch to others.

 

Don

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Lovely work. Look forward to seeing the U28 finished. Shame you aren’t doing a 4mm too!!!
Duncan

Duncan,

Thank you.  The 6 wheelers I've done were all available in 4mm, the V13 was a Colin Waite kit and the other 3 were all available from IKB Models (probably now available from the Broad Gauge Society).  I still have unmade IKB kits for the U21 (without clerestory) and S6, and an almost finished U28 (which I never will finish now) :

post-12089-0-22863400-1517649105_thumb.jpg

 

I really must get up in the loft one day to retrieve my 4mm stuff and see what i can get rid of as I'm never going to go back to 4mm.

 

very nice are you offering them to the Association?

 

Nick

 

Nice work Ian. I definitely think you should offer the etch to others.

 

Don

Nick & Don,

Thank you.  I had not really thought about making them available to anyone else - I think that they can all be made up into decent models but as one would probably expect as a first attempt at designing a kit of parts there are some minor issues which would need to be resolved before asking others to part with their hard-earned (and I haven't tried to paint them yet!).  In reality, I wouldn't really want to go to the expense of correcting the artwork and getting a new photo tool done once I have the models I wanted, perhaps somewhat selfish I know.  If others feel that they would like a copy of the etch with the odd issue however, I don't know whether they can order directly from PPD as they hold the photo tool.

 

 
Ian
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Duncan,

Thank you.  The 6 wheelers I've done were all available in 4mm, the V13 was a Colin Waite kit and the other 3 were all available from IKB Models (probably now available from the Broad Gauge Society).  I still have unmade IKB kits for the U21 (without clerestory) and S6, and an almost finished U28 (which I never will finish now) :

attachicon.gifU28.JPG

 

I really must get up in the loft one day to retrieve my 4mm stuff and see what i can get rid of as I'm never going to go back to 4mm.

 

 

Nick & Don,

Thank you.  I had not really thought about making them available to anyone else - I think that they can all be made up into decent models but as one would probably expect as a first attempt at designing a kit of parts there are some minor issues which would need to be resolved before asking others to part with their hard-earned (and I haven't tried to paint them yet!).  In reality, I wouldn't really want to go to the expense of correcting the artwork and getting a new photo tool done once I have the models I wanted, perhaps somewhat selfish I know.  If others feel that they would like a copy of the etch with the odd issue however, I don't know whether they can order directly from PPD as they hold the photo tool.

 

 
Ian

 

 

I don't see your view as being selfish. I do know how much time can be involved in resolving minor issues. To be available from the Association shop you would need to resolved said issues but you could as a one off bundle up an order from a few sheets for friends who would accept them as a very useful start.

 

Don

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The other issue is producing comprehensive instructions. A kit without instructions is only a set of parts.

 

Jim

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The other issue is producing comprehensive instructions. A kit without instructions is only a set of parts.

 

Jim

 

You mean you don't enjoy the challenge when either the instructions have been lost or start to wish they had been.  A  sheet of etches is only some parts it would be unlikely to be all the parts needed. one could pick which parts you wanted to use and scrap any that don't quite fit with your ideas. 

 

Don

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