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CraigZ

Yarmouth Model Works Wabash 12 panel welded box car

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Here we go.  Floor/underframe built out.  Crossbearers installed, all brake rigging and air lines installed save for the train line - it's tucked so far up into the floor that it's not visible unless the car is upside down.  The gubbin to the right of the air cylinder is the slack adjustment mechanism by the way.

 

Some work has been done on the body in the form of the bracket grab irons (Kadee, supplied w/ kit), the wire end grabs, and the doors.  Next bit will be to build the ladders...yes build them.  The stiles are photoetched that has to be bent and then have the rungs added.  I plan to solder the rungs in, built up a wooden jig to do so.

 

post-751-0-65863100-1441376091_thumb.jpg

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And a little more progress.  The ladders are Pierre Oliver's (owner of Yarmouth) design - etched stiles into which you insert and secure the rungs made from Tichy grab irons. Instructions say to cut the Tichy grabs very short, glue into place on the stiles, put bits of 2'x3' styrene behind as stand offs, then glue the assembly to the car. Knowing reality these suggestions, while making a pretty model, would yield airborne parts in about 90 seconds as they flew off the finished model the first time anybody touched the thing (classic resin kit issue by the way). What I decided to do was solder the rungs in place and to leave two of the grabs/rungs long to secure the ladder to the car. Ended up making a jig from basswood to do this...and I like the results. And they'll be mighty durable. Other end of the car shows the Kadee grabs attached. This, by the way, is a REALLY nice kit...the 'weld puckering' on the side is very nicely done...

 

With the ladders attached at one end and one unattached ladder:
post-751-0-23114100-1442108898_thumb.jpg

 

Kadee grabs attached.

post-751-0-06595900-1442108901_thumb.jpg

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Nice work Craig. The ladders are a neat solution.

As you say the welded sides are well represented in the kit. In the real world, things are rarely flat.

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And the built-out kit.  The major compromise I made (for robustness) was to use A Line stirrups instead of the lovely etched bits Yarmouth provides. Pierre Oliver deserves great compliments on this kit - it's one of the nicest resin kits I've ever built, and I've built a few.

 

post-751-0-22031600-1442274886_thumb.jpg

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The Scalecoat II paint on the Yarmouth Model Works' Wabash 12 panel welded boxcar has cured up to the point where I'm ready to decal. The waviness of the welded panels really shows in the glossy Scalecoat II finish.

 

post-751-0-62934000-1443970867_thumb.jpg

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Looking great, Craig.

 

And a very useful tip on fixing the ladders securely, I shall be pinching that neat trick when I build my own WAB 12-panel kit (and the various other cars I'll be fitting Pierre's excellent ladders to).

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That panel effect should be looked at by the RTR manufacturers of many British loco and coaches.

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Decaled and flat finished.  Hopefully I can work out how to bring back the 'wavy' look of the panels.

 

post-751-0-35760100-1445041368_thumb.jpg

post-751-0-37702300-1445041371_thumb.jpg

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What a lovely job!

 

I'm in the middle of building the Yarmouth CP War Emergency boxcar - the plywood-sided one - and although it too is a smashing kit I found that the ladder-stiles were just a tad too fragile for my clumsy fingers in their unfolded state, so I replaced them with the Detail Associates ones.

 

Your success with them puts my efforts to shame! Well done!

 

John

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What a lovely job!

 

I'm in the middle of building the Yarmouth CP War Emergency boxcar - the plywood-sided one - and although it too is a smashing kit I found that the ladder-stiles were just a tad too fragile for my clumsy fingers in their unfolded state, so I replaced them with the Detail Associates ones.

 

Your success with them puts my efforts to shame! Well done!

 

John

Thanks!  Frankly if I had not had the idea for the assembly jig for the ladders I would have done what you did.  Even with the jig they're very fiddly to get right...

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Could I impose on you to post a picture of the jig? I have some ideas myself, but there's no point in reinventing the wheel!

 

The DA ladders are of course lovely, but I suspect that they're what the Yarmouth instructions refer to as ones which are so fragile that they break when they're being freed from the sprues! Still, I'm not so unhandy with those, and they went on a treat!

Edited by John_Hughes

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Could I impose on you to post a picture of the jig? I have some ideas myself, but there's no point in reinventing the wheel!

 

The DA ladders are of course lovely, but I suspect that they're what the Yarmouth instructions refer to as ones which are so fragile that they break when they're being freed from the sprues! Still, I'm not so unhandy with those, and they went on a treat!

Craig,

 

 

Great job as always. (On another note, hoping you and yours weren't impacted by Matthew in your area of NC).

 

John, Not positive, but think Craig may be referring to a spacer like the one shown in this post on my Steam Freight Cars blog (post by Pierre Oliver).

 

http://steamerafreightcars.blogspot.com/2014/08/tips-and-tricks-working-with-yarmouth.html

 

Hope this helps,

 

Marty McGuirk

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Craig,

 

 

Great job as always. (On another note, hoping you and yours weren't impacted by Matthew in your area of NC).

 

John, Not positive, but think Craig may be referring to a spacer like the one shown in this post on my Steam Freight Cars blog (post by Pierre Oliver).

 

http://steamerafreightcars.blogspot.com/2014/08/tips-and-tricks-working-with-yarmouth.html

 

Hope this helps,

 

Marty McGuirk

Marty,

 

Thanks!  No real issues for us from the storm apart from no TV/Internet for a few days.  I got nothin' to complain about.  The jig I used was made of basswood and set up to allow me insert a couple of grabs at full length and to be able to hold the work to solder the ladders solid.  Styrene would melt from the soldering.   I haven't tried the Loctite product Pierre uses; it may work well.  I prefer the strength of the soldered ladder with the long grabs inserted into the body for durability.  I've made too many trips to RPM meets only to find ladders and such have fallen off en route...grumble grumble...

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